(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "San Francisco News Letter (Jan.-June 1922)"

I 






N1A 



D 50D7 lEDESbM a 

California Stale Library J J^ ^ tX Y . 






>e»T < » 



Accession JVo. 
Call JVo. 



54725 



12::; 11-20 10M 



at.0M.S.\^.«v.. 



J^ 



Established July 20 1856 



PRICE 10 CENTS 







SATURDAY, JULY 2, 1921 



AND 

(California AfoprttBrr 

$5.00 PER YEAR 



r 



That CORN 



ends tonight 



f\ Make that resolve and watch what Blue-jay does. 

^ Apply it with a touch the liquid or the plaster. The 
corn pain will cease at once. In a little while the whole 
corn will loosen and come out. 

CJ This is the scientific method and is right. A famous 
chemist perfected it. This world-famed laboratory stakes 
its reputation on it. 

•]J It is gentle, yet sure. The old, harsh methods are not in 
favor now. 



Over 100 million Corns — 



N 



ow 



^ Blue-jay has ended at least a hundred million corns 
it is ending, probably, 20 million corns -a y?ar. 

^ It has brought to multitudes freedom from corn aches. 

^ Such a relief easy, quick and simple deserves you 
Try it on one corn tonight. 



PLASTER OR LIQUID 

Bluejay 



BAUER & BLACK D ukro,B 



CHICAGO 



ressings and Allied Products 
rV'Eir YORK TOROXTO 




B*B 1921 



End other foot troubles 

To keep the (eel in proper con- 
dition, bathe them with Blue- 
jay Foot Soap. It checks ei- 
ceisrre perspiration. It stops 
a'tmg and burning. 

Then use Blue-jay Foot Rebel", a 
soothing, cooling massage for 
aching mufcles and tendons. 

A final luxury b Blue-jay Foot 
Powder, an antiseptic, deodor- 
ant powder that keeps feet 
feeling tin' 



___-w Blwe-jar treatment* - 
Eeacb, 35c: C-Uiitina pa* 



"^ 



, 




THE BEAUTIFUL 

Hotel Manx 

Powell at OTarrell: SAN FRANCISCO 



— Whether it is business or pleasure that 
brings you to San Francisco, you will 
find it to vour advantage to stav at this 
beautiful Hotel. CJ Consider this a per- 
sonal invitation; we want you »o make 
the Hotel Manx vour Hnme when v^u 
are here. <J Attractive Summer Rates. 




Oy^CwwC 



.Cf/CWX. 



Phone 
Prospect 7932 



Night Phone 

Franklin 2789 



KENDALL & DARNEILLE 

AUTOMOBILE MACHINISTS 
Eight Cylinder Specialists 



472 TURK ST., near Larki, 



San Francisco 



"The House of Quality" 
GOLDEN GATE DAIRY LUNCH 

Block 8i McDonald. Props. 

Service Supreme Home Cooking 

Prices Reasonable 

172 EDDY STREET 

Visit them after the show and meal times 



\ffas o/dffV 



J. B. CROWE 



Kinds * 



3652 GEARY, at 1st Ave. 1055 Post St., at Polk 

PHONE FRANKLIN 7445 

GLAZING 
BEVELING 



AUTOMOBILE 
BUILDING 



Glass of All Kinds 



^an jFratixiaro .QJjygtttcb 









Leading Ne<vs"p'apef of tn 


= ¥ac 


fie Coast 








A 


N 


ewspaper 


made 


every 


day 








TO SPEAK 


TO 










Ever 


y 


member 


of 


every 


f ami 


ly 



Order at once the Daily and Sunday hronic le, delivered for $1.15 a 

month — including Sunday editions. 
Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postmaster. 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Company in America." 

FIRE AUTOMOBILE WINDSTORM 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 

REASONABLE RATES 



1 ■•/'/ • •• " ■ ■ '■ ■ • • ..,'. • 



VINOBAR! 

What Can It Be? 
Ask Your Dealer in Home Brew 

VINOBAR MFG. CO. 

536-38 Washington St., San Francisco 



For Good Things to Eat 

—at the Right Price 

PATRONIZE THE NEW 

Club Grill & Restaurant 

132 MONTGOMERY STREET 
Between Sutler & Bush 

OPEN FOR BREAKFAS1 
LUNCH AND V1NNER 

Former chef of Nugget Cafe in charge — 
also A. Pacini, formerly of Louis' Fashion 

PHONE KEARNY 1910 



PENINSULAR PATRONAGE SOLICITED 



POST-TAYLOR GARAGE, Inc. 

530 TAYLOR ST. 

Washing and Greasing Cars 
in a careful and efficient manner 



54.725 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20. 1856. 




SAN £8§* C «*C 




Devoted lo the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. XCIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., Saturday, July 2, 1921 



No. 27 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA 
ADVERTISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. 
Frederick Marriott. 259 Minna Street, near Fourth, San Francisco, Cal. Tele- 
phone Kearny 720. Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post Office as second 
class mail matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. O, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year, $5.00. Foreign: One 
year $6.00; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and mill not Ac 
resftonsro/e for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 



We never can have confidence in our courts while they remain 

only prizes for cheap politicians. 

* * * 

The doctors have started war on the Drys. If the doctors fail 

we laymen may as well sew up our hip pockets. 

Spells of public hysteria have to work themselves out like the 

ambition of a one-armed man to be a golf champion. 

Where is that Bird of Peace which took to the woods a few 

years ago and has been seen nowhere on earth ever since? 

Rail shop crafts refuse the reduced wages offered them. They 

have to be in fashion with the rest of the crazy world. 

* * * 

Don't forget that the present swing towards anarchy would 

be less disturbing if we had confidence in our courts. 

* * * 

Wage reductions would be bad enough for the hard working- 
man, without war on his beer by Congressional fanatics. 

Bootlegging has become such an important industry it will 

never permit Uncle Sam to put a tax on booze any more. 

The world isn't any worse than ever, but the disturbers happen 

to be blocking the middle of the road and holding up the procession. 

* * * 

Fears that the American murder record may fall below 15.000 

this year are unfounded. Even Russia will be a poor second in 

the race. 

» » » 

The federal reserve system was to banish panics and busi- 
ness slumps for ever, but there must have been a screw loose some- 
where in the machinery. 

* * • 

The old boys who believed that the only sure way lo get 

rich quickly was to squeeze the nickels and go very slow were not 
so wild in their philosophy. 



-Chesterton, the famous English writer. 



now in America, a 
amazed by the lack of our personal liberty, ^es. dear old chap. 
it's almost as bad as you have it at home. 
* * * 

Prohibition was recommended as conducive to sanity and pub- 
lic morality, but the Wet* say it's finest effects are shown in the 
increased demand for lunatic asylums and jails. 



An organization combined with the B. B. Movement — the Bridge 

Movement, the San Francisco Rastal plan and the Greater Bay sec- 
tion is now in order. 



The real surprise would be if Sam Gompers was not re-elected 

by his close corporation which has helped him for forty years to 
cut the pie and still hopes to hold on to the pie counter. 

* * ¥ 

Wouldn't you think the Drys would have sense enough not to 

expect the world to relapse to cold water, after dodging it for 
over nine thousand years we know of — and then some. 

* * * 

Women who talk about shooting Jim Rolph, should be sen- 
tenced to wear long skirts and wheel baby carriages. Didn't we 
elect Mission Jim? We get what we want and deserve. 

* * * 

Will all the vacant stores and theaters be turned into religious 

reading rooms, to accommodate the overflow from the churches, 
when the Blue Sunday Brotherhood have got the Devil by the tail? 

* * * 

I low would some scrawny lawyer in ihe House of Represent- 
atives like to work eight hours in the sun laying bricks, and be 
denied a glass of beer to wet his whistle at the end of the weary 
day? 

* * * 

Nobody seems to remember that life and property could be 

made more unsafe, if we only returned to the old pioneer plan of 
electing our Chief of Police, as well as our judges. Think it over 
Messrs. McCarthy. Furuseth & Co. 

* * * 

As most of our local statesmen proceed on the theory that we 

must fight Japan, might it not be a good idea to quit fighting each 
other and get ready for the foreigners? Our union leaders have 
been conducting a civil war on employers for thirty years. 

* * * 

All the psychologists are asking "What's the matter with these 

United Stales anyway?" What's the matter with a Thanksgiving 
nightmare, after too much fat turkey and rich mince pie? Over 
prosperity is the trouble. 

» ♦ » 

Putting dynamite under the Federal Reserve Bank structure 

is still regarded as a misdemeanor instead of a laudable act by 
our police judges. One of them has compelled a blast artist to 
put up $500 bail. That judicial tyrant and enemy of capital will 
get his when he comes up for re-election. 

» • • 

. What must be the feelings of a locked-out plasterer, loafing on 

Third street who cannot find ten cents in his pockets for a cup 
of coffee, though he might be earning eight dollars a day. if his 
leaders let him accept the reasonable reduction of fifty cents a 
day. Where else in the world does i man gel eight dollars a day 
for throwing mud at a wall? 



San Francisco News Letter and 



DITqBIAL, 




Organized labor was regarded with favor un- 
The Public Revolt til it dawned upon the public that within the 
organization there had grown up a strong-arm 
squad. For years the public has been treated to scenes of brass 
knuckling and bludgeoning of free labor — the kind of labor which 
does not acknowledge the right of the union leaders to dictate as to 
who shall or shall not be able to earn a living in this country. Right 
here in San Francisco, within the last few weeks of the shipping 
strike we have had men maimed and mauled and the same condition 
will surely prevail, as it has in the past, in the case of the lockout- 
strike in the building trades. 

The .people have come to a realization that the unions must take 
the responsibility for the law breaking and it is certain the day is 
coming when the union local will have to incorporate and be made 
just as responsible to the public for its acts as any employer or em- 
ploying corporation. Not only is this so, but the union is 
going to be held strictly accountable for its acts and the individual 
member of the union, the slugging sympathizer, too, is going to 
feel the heavy hand of retributive justice. On many an occasion, the 
miscreants who beat up a free workman were lectured by the police 
court judge and allowed to go with a reprimand and, in some cases, 
with no reprimand at all, while the complainant was accused of 
drunkenness and told to go forth and not quarrel again. Those who 
interested themselves in obtaining justice for the poor beaten up free 
workmen soon found that it was well nigh useless to appeal to police 
judges for justice, especially right here in San Francisco, the erst- 
while model closed shop town. 

The closed shop is probably responsible for more harm done to 
San Francisco than any other deterrent factor in its entire exist- 
ence and the establishment of the AMERICAN PLAN will do more 
to bring back prosperity and industrial activity than any other fac- 
tor in the era of reconstruction, now on. It is not the cry of the 
employer and his frightened and beaten up free workers that is 
now heard in revolt in the land. It is the long suffering and now 
impatient American public, which has decreed that no organization 
has a right to demand that all should starve while its membership 
alone has the right to profiteer, to pilfer and to maim and murder 
and live in ease and plenty meanwhile. Brass knuckling and black- 
jacking has got to stop, the courts soon will be told in unmistake- 
able terms that a membership card in a union is not a pass to im- 
munity from punishment for crimes committed in the name of the 
unions. 

Those within the unions had best take the warning that unless the 
.professional chieftains are curbed in the use of methods the public 
now frowns on and the bad features of unionism are eliminated that 
unionism itself will be destroyed by the people. There is no organi- 
zation, public or private, that can stand if the people decree that it 
shall cease to exist. And nothing that is just or right in the demands 
of organized labor needs the brass knuckle, the blackjack, the sand 
bag or any other form of violence or murder to make it effective. 
It is only the things that are in themselves bad which demand the use 
of the strong arm squad to terrorize the free workman and to paral- 

ize the employer into a submission. 

* * * 

Frank E. Booth, the dean of the fisheries men of 
Eat More Fish the State of California, is out in a statement to the 

Chamber of Commerce, suggesting that we eat 
more fish. He makes the wise suggestion that we have two fish 
days instead of one and that we stop eating fish, merely as a change 
of diet, but eat fish as part of the regular food. Which is right and 



to the point. The effect of such a course adopted by the people 
would be to immediately double the fish food consumption and thus 
double the output of our great canneries. The SAN FRANCISCO 
NEWS LETTER is the pioneer in this line of argument and, for 
years, has advocated the greater consumption of our native fish 
by the people. Fish is good food. This is especially true of canned 
fish and particularly of the California sardine, of which there is no 
better in the whole world. Our fish canning industry is become 
very profitable and it is of very large dimensions. Take the items 
of sardines and tuna, for instance. There are caught annually in 
California over 150.00,000 pounds of sardines and over 30,000,000 
pounds of tuna. The wholesale value of the fish products of Cali- 
fornia annually is more than twenty-five million dollars. We can 
make that fifty millions over night, by adopting an extra fish day. 
This would mean just that much more money distributed among 
those who go to make the fishing possible. It would mean a great 
addition to our industrial population. Why not immediately make 
up your mind for the extra fish day? In this connection, it might be 
suggested that a wisely directed publicity would very easily increase 
the demand for fish. The fish producers might adopt a more liberal 
policy towards those organs which go into the homes. Publicity of a 
taking style giving recipies for the preparing and the cooking or the 
serving of fish would be agreeable to the home people. 

Bernard Shaw devotes two columns to the 
A Colossal Humbug Dempsey — Carpentier fight to show that he 
knows as little about the subject as most of 
those he selects. As a soap-box socialistic orator in London, Shaw 
is a great success but as a sporting editor he knows as little as most 
of the gentry who have been airing their opinions for weeks to the 
distress of newspaper readers. 

Shaw thinks Carpentier is a superman of the ring because he 
knocked out a couple of slow English heavyweights, who could 
hardly get out of their own way. He misses the real point of the 
subject which is that a couple of pugs, who would be overpaid at a 
dollar an hour for services, are to divide half a million dollars for a 
twelve round bout with gloves, which involves no danger, and adds 
nothing to the world's useful stock of knowledge. 

If any proof were needed that humanity has gone mad on money 
making the Dempsey-Carpentier match, supplies it. The affair is 
nothing more than a flimsy scheme of sport speculators and moving 
picture manufacturers to increase their profits. The gate money at 
the socalled "fight" will pay the speculators expenses for the boxers 
purse, ring construction, etc., and leave a clear profit on the moving 
picture, which can be shown all over Europe and a large part of 
Asia and Africa. 

In no respect is the "Contest" a real sporting event like the 
old fashioned prize-ring battles that were fought to a finish with bare 
fists or hard gloves and always for moderate stakes. In its palmy days 
the prize-ring was patronized by the sporting nobility of England. 
The fights were in reality duels, the public having little knowledge 
fought in secluded spots of which only a selected few had knowledge. 
The fights were in reality duels, the public having litlte knowledge 
until the affair had been settled. Many of those ring fights were 
fierce encounters, and finally the laws against them were made so 
severe that the rich patrons were driven out of the sport and it be- 
came the monopoly of the lowest class in England. 

The adoption of the Queensbury Rules changed the conditions. 
The old Marquis of Queensbury drew up the rules to regulate box- 
ing matches in clubs between amateurs, and the brutal features of 
the real ring fights were eliminated. 

John L. Sullivan was one of the first professional boxers to lake 
advantage of the Queensbury Rules and made a sensation, traveling 
in America and knocking out all comers in four rounds. That re- 
vived the public interest in boxing. The four-round limitation was 
abolished and fights with gloves under Queensbury Rule grew popu- 
lar. Many wonderful boxers appeared in the American ring, sev- 
eral being Australians who had learned the art from Jem Mace the 
most noted of old English pugilists. Peter Jackson the black hercu- 
les from Sydney and Bob Fitzsimmons were the most noted, and it 
is safe to say that no present day boxer is the equal of those men. 



California Advertiser for July 2, 1921 



The old style of finish fights brought to the top the real champions, 
but the new plan of boxing a few rounds as an excuse to grab the 
gate money has substituted showmen for gladiators. There are no 
more pugilists like John L. Sullivan, Peter Jackson, and Bob 
Fitzsimmons. Those men all graduated as gladiators from a hard 
school in which fake fighters had no favor. 

The absurdity of calling the Dempsey-Carpentier affair a "fight" 
is apparent from the fact that they only box for a little over half 
an hour. The old finish fights established the fact that when two 
skilled pugilists met it required nearly an hour for a knockout. Peter 
Jackson and Jim Corbett fought in San Francisco for over fifty 
rounds, because they were well matched and cautious. A couple 
of angry longshoremen can finish a battle in thirty seconds, but 
they are not trained gladiators. 

The Dempsey-Carpentier affair is a present of a fortune to two 
boxers to spar long enough to start a perspiration so that a picture 
worth a million dollars can be filmed. From the sporting standpoint 
it is a veritable fake. It is a sad commentary that such a humbug 
should be touted all over America, when we have so many really 
serious matters demanding attention. 

Those who own and operate 
Don't Poke Fun at Los Angeles factories did not go to Los An- 
geles because of the climate 
and the oranges. They went there because they learned that Los 
Angeles is an industrial free city. For years Los Angeles has used 
this fact as a drawing card to bring the population to its borders. 
Being free of the tyranny of the unions has brought to Los Angeles 
the free workingman and woman and the enterprising owner of the 
factory. The working man and woman of Los Angeles knows that 
he or she has not to ask permission to labor to earn a living of a 
professional labor boss or agitator and the employer knows that he 
may run his industrial enterprise without asking permission of the 
same labor boss or agitator to so do. 

Wherever you find a closed shop city you find a backward city. 
Wherever you find a city where industrial enterprise is untrammelled 
and the workman is free you find an advancing prosperous city. 

He says that tax exemption of municipal issues has worked in 
a way to make the rich richer and the poor poorer and that, in effect, 
eventually the tax exempt security will drive from the market all of 
the taxable securities and will stop practically a great deal of enter- 
prise which has added to the national prosperity. He says that, at 
the present time, the wealthiest citizens in the country are rendering 
themselves tax exempt by investing in tax exempt securities. 

There is no good reason why municipal securities should remain 
untaxable. The only effect has been to divide the investing public 
in two classes — the wealthy individuals who buy tax exempt bonds 
and the other class to whom tax-exemption means little or nothing 
and who therefor go on buying taxable bonds. The latter class 
is one that in time will dwindle down and those composing it will 
most likely, join the ranks of those who are protecting themselves 
against taxation. It is noted that tax exemption has not build up a 
larger market for securities nor has it made for a lower rate, the 
investment fund remains the same. 

It is a bad situation and it should be reme- 
No Jubject For Jokes died. If we continue adding to the list of 
the non-taxable securities we will soon find 
ourselves in the position of having strangled all initiative and enter- 
prise by closing the avenues to the money usually obtainable for in- 
vestment in the bonds ol private corporations. This has rad and 
will continue to have, a very bad effect, especially as affecting the 
housing situation. What is there that is left that will tempt a wealthy 
investor when he can get as much as a fi\e per cent return on a tax 
exempt bond. A seventeen per cent private corporation bond that is 
taxable will not bring as large a return. 

The harm is found in the fact, beyond this, that municipalities 
indulge themselves with the money thus obtained in a regular orgie 
ol expenditure. The Hetch Hetchy. apart from the objections ad- 
vanced that it will not and cannot produce enough water, has pro\en 
a sinkhole in which the millions of the people of San Francisco 
h»ve been sunk and from which it is alleged no return will ever ade- 



quately be had. It is on this kind of a project that tax exempt bonds 
are issued. If the Hetch eHtchy had been a private enterprise it 
would have been stopped long ago by the stockholders and an ac- 
count as to the use made of their money demanded and a demand 
be made as to when the work was to be completed. No corporation 
would be allowed to carry on a work of this magnitude for so long 
a time without some sort of guarantee being given that water was 
surely to be had after completion of the work. 

If a H of this money has been expended to as- 
Water Extravagance ..sure the irrigation districts a plentiful supply 
of water San Francisco really does receive in- 
directly a benefit therefrom but San Francisco's people, as stock- 
holders in the enterprise, would not have entered into such an enter- 
prise with the idea of furnishing water for irrigation ourposes, re- 
serving for the city whatever may be left after the supply to the irri- 
gation districts has been given them. The rankest amateur would 
know, instinctively, that there was something wrong and would balk 
the idea. Anyone who had given the idea half a minute of study 
would realize that it wasn't and isn't the business of San Francisco 
to spend its millions to furnish water to a lot of agriculturists and 
then depend on the generosity of these agriculturists for a residue 
after their irrigation districts have been served. It is well to remem- 
ber, too. that the producing caDacity in the way of water by Hetch 
Hetchy is limited even if we take the estimates of the most sanguine 
enthusiasts, while the area to be. watered, for irrigation, is constantly 
increasing and will continue to increase. 

It is onlv fair to assume that the Hetch Hetchv may work out a 
very fine hydro-electric nroposition and it may produce a vast volume 
of power. It was initially gone into by San Francisco as a water 
producing proposition, however, and the manufacturing of electricity 
is anparently an after thought. 

It is certain that this is a most interesting and entertaining sub- 
ject upon which volumes might be written and it is most illuminating, 
as showing just what a city can do in the way of spending the 
people's money lavishly. 

¥ * * 

The Portland Oregonian never 
Prohibition Protesters Parade misses an opportunity to criticize 

prohibition. Writing of the Fourth 
of Jury parade of nrohibition-orotesters, it savs: 

"On the Fourth of Julv the citizens of the United States have 
been inviied to walk in New York in a parade of protest against 
ibat invasion of personal liberty called the Volstead act. It is not 
I'kely that the procession will be either verv long or very imposing. 
From its rrnks will be missed three classes that represent a maiority 
of our population — mooshiners. bootlegeers. and homebrewers. These 
are passionately fond of prohibition. It has enriched the first two 
cUsses. and given to the other an interest in applied chemistry that 
adds creatlv to the iov of living. We mav expect to hear from the 
joyous moonshiner, bootlegger, and homebrewer a deal of highly 
sarcastic comment on the proposed parade. 

"Some of us were inclined to believe that Drohibition. marking a 
temporary aberration of the political mind, could not possibly be per- 
manent. But now we are not so sure that the sort of Drohibition 
thai we have will not continue. It is an absurd and ineffective pro- 
hibition a law much more honored in the breach than in the observ- 
ance. Because it is that sort of Drohibition. rallying to its suooort we 
find that innumerable caravan that consists of all the illicit distillers, 
all the bootleggers, and all the homebrewers in the country. And 
thev are highly respectable as to numbers, at least. 

"Of course, there are some persons in this great and glorious 
land of the free who respect and observe the prohibition law. But 
the great maiority of these were real teetotalers before the Volstead 
act was added to the other horrors of war. Looking at the Volstead 
law. than which there is no measure so contemptuously treated and 
K> persistently violated, in a quite unprejudiced way. The Spectator 
thinks that it is doing as much harm as good to our people — and the 
°ood it has done is very great, indeed. But it has made heretofore 
decent and law-abiding citizens plain, self-confessed law-breakers. 
No doubt it has decreased drunkenness bu> undoubtedly created 
a lot of law-breakers." 



San Francisco News Letter and 



Anti- Japanese Treaty 

By HARVEY BROUGHAM 

HOW much do we know about the Anglo-Japanese alliance, 
which is coming before the Imperial Conference in London? 
Practically nothing, though it is one of the most important 
propositions, from the white man's view point that has been pre- 
sented in this century. To Californians it is pregnant with import- 
ance, yet we hear less of the matter in San Francisco than we do 
of the trivial twelve-round boxing match with soft gloves between 
Dempsey and Carpentier. 

The An^lo-Japanese treaty was causing Great Britain and her 
colonies serious thought, dates back twenty-five years. It comes up 
now for renewal in a form much different from the original bargain. 

When the Anglo-Japanese treaty was first made. Russia was 
pressing forward into the Far East and threatening the independence 
of Korea, the Japanese said. In reality, Japan had her own eyes 
fixed on Korea, and feared that if the Russian Bear laid his huge 
paws on the backward kingdom, Japan could never expand in that 
direction. So Japan approached Britain for an alliance and Britain 
gave willing ear, for Russia was a serious menace to the northern 
frontier and gateway of India. 

Thus was the Anglo-Japanese treaty formulated and has al- 
ready been modified and reviewd a second time. How will the Im- 
perial Conference in London receive the third draft of the important 

treaty? 

* * * 

Originally many British authorities disliked the treaty, but ow- 
ing to the earnest advocacy of Lord Lansdowne the alliance was 
made. Britain promised that if Japan were attacked simultaneously 
by two enemy powers, the Britsh would come to her aid. Soon after 
the war between Russia and Japan occurred and Russia was de- 
feated. 

A new Anglo-Japanese treaty was then signed, involving Brit- 
ain in more serious obligations. Japan guaranteed to support British 
rule in India and Great Britain in return pledged herself to side with 
Japan, should the latter be attacked by one power. 

Does the treaty mean that in a conflict of Japan and the United 
States, Britain would take the Japanese side? Not at all say rep- 
resentative British people. Lord Northcliffe has taken the trouble to 
explain that the treaty is no menace to America, and Baron Haya- 
shi, Japan's Ambassodor in London has thanked Northcliffe for his 
statement. A month later, in the Japanese Diet, Viscount Ucheda, 
the Foreign Minister announced that there was an understanding 
between Japan and Great Britain that the treaty could not involve 
the British in a war between Japan and the United States. The 
world has become somewhat suspicious of all treaties as "scraps of 
paper" and it is not quite clear to the American mind, that there is 
any absolute guarantee of Britain's remaining aloof from a quarrel 
between Japan and the United States. 

* * * 

Canada is regarded as unfavorable to the renewal of the treaty. 
Australia, is not disposed to closer relations with any Asiatic power, 
newed. must be made acceptable to America. New Zealand, like 
Australia, is not disposed to closer relations with any Asiatic person. 

The recent was has made great changes in the world. The 
treaty, now, is not a bargain between a monarchy of old Europe 
and one of Asia but a bargain what includes English speaking de- 
mocracies of the new world. There are few monarchies left except 
Japan and England, but democracies are steadily growing in popu- 
lation and strength. But for these democracies it would have gone 
hard with the British Empire in the great European struggle. 

It is evident that the renewal of the Anglo-Japanese treaty will 
be no easy task. Many serious questions will have to be considered 
for new angles. The old world diplomats must tread continuously 
to avoid the .prejudices of the new democracies that have come into 
international prominence. An open settlment of the relations be- 
tween Great Britain, the United States and Japan, with all the 
cards on the table, will have to be reached. 

What Canada fears, is that without such a settlement a situation 
might arise in the Pacific, in which England and Japan would sit 



on one side of the diplomatic table and China and the United States 
on the other. Canada has lost heavily in men and money by the 
recent war and hopes earnestly for a long peace in which friendly 
relations between the United States and Japan would cut an im- 
portant figure. 

It is earnestly to be hoped the settlement will be reached in the 
deliberations of the Imperial conference and therefore intelligent 
public opinion in Canada strongly condemns the demagogic theory 
that war between America and Japan is "inevitable." There 
is nothing inevitable about it. With the sentiment in Canada and 
Australia as it is, and the United States in possession of a sane and 
patriotic national government, peace and not war should be inevi- 
table. 

Cheap demogogues and yellow newspapers should not be able 
to plunge important nations into a terrible conflict, in which honest 
citizens have nothing to gain and much to lose. We have seen 
what war has done to the greatest of military powers which pinned 
its hopes on the sword. 

While all these considerations favor a satisfactory settlement of 
the problem on the Pacific it would be hard to imagine a more 
ominous diplomatic situation than Britain will face at the Imperial 
conference in London. An alliance with Japan must seem very at- 
tractive to the British Empire at present. It could relieve the Brit- 
ish anxiety over India and establish a balance of power in the Pa- 
cific. 

Great Britain, however, cannot disregard public opinion in her 
colonies, which in the past few years have evinced a desire for fuller 
expression which cannot be denied. The latest display is the demand 
in Canada for a Governor General, who shall be neither "an orna- 
mental figure nor a partisan sent out from England." Canada de- 
mands the right to chose her own Governor General and is disposed 
to sending an ambassador, to represent her at Washington. These 
aspirations of the Dominion will no doubt be conveyed to British 
statesmen at the Imperial conference. 



MONEY- 



DEPOSITED IN OUR 

TIME DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT 

ON OR BEFORE 

JULY 10th 

WILL DRAW INTEREST FROM JULY 
FIRST AT THE CURRENT RATE OF 
INTEREST, WHICH AT PRESENT IS 



4% 



As™ 

Bann 



anueaim 



CALIFORNIA AND MONTGOMERY STREETS 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

WinAim tNj>. 14 



California Advertiser for July 2, 1921 







Some people of a suspicious nature, fancy that an underhand 

and sinister attempt to defeat the Oakland bridge scheme is con- 
templated in the newspaper portraits of the bay city mayor's that 
are appearing. Why arouse public prejudice by taking fistfulls of 
pictures out of the police records and printing them as portraits 

of the chief magistrates of neighboring municipalities? 

* * * 

Not everybody who reads the newspapers is personally 

acquainted with the bay city mayors. Of course the Town Crier 
cannot be fooled by such pictorial attempts to create prejudice. 
We have many times had the pleasure of shaking the brawny fist 
of Mayor John L. Davie of Oakland, and know that he is a 
splendid physical composite of Hercules and Apollo — the glass of 
fashion and the mould of form. But the malevolent photographers 
of the newspapers make him look like a waterfront blast artist. 

about to drop a bomb over the gunwale of a scab lumber schooner. 

* * * 

The caricatures have posed the handsome Mayor with his 

hands behind his back, so that one can imagine the tail of his 
coat is the end of the bomb he carries. The brim of his hat is 
pulled down and his fine countenance twisted into a scowl sug- 
gestive of Jailbreaker Gardner's stare on hearing that the Bulletin 
had decided to publish his "autobiography" compiled by Viscount 

Morphy, late of Kilballhoo Castle, County Kerry. 

* * * 

Really this kind of subtle malignity must be stopped. If 

Congress can keep honest taxpayers from their home-brew, why 
not restrain the newspaper photographers from their pictorial libels 
on noted statesmen? 

* * ¥ 

Mayor Bartlelt, the popular Mayor of Berkeley, though not as 

picturesque an Adonis as Mayor Davie of Oakland, is a most pre- 
sentable gentleman and punctillious in his attire. But the photo- 
graphic malefactors have made him look like an "ad" For a 
Hickenheimer suit, knocked down from $500 to $11.30 including 
the war tax. If the popular Mayor of Berkeley does not institute 
criminal proceedings, the University Regents should step in and 

protect their classic town. 

* * * 

The caricature of Mayor Frank Otis of Alameda could not 

be more misleading than those of his neighboring magistrates, but 
the photographic miscreants have done their worst to him. Glancing 
at the pictorial libel on him. as do most newspaper readers, the 
impression conveyed is that the worthy Mayor is standing in the 
dock and the police judge has just asked the bailiff whether the 

charge is robbery or bootlegging. 

* » * 

Yes, gentlemen of the camera! This kind of misrepresenta- 
tion must be nipped in the bud or the bridge scheme will become as 

popular as 2 cent beer around Howard street. 

* » • 

The Town Crier confesses to acute surprise that the enter- 
prising Chronicle did not make several pages of the Afgahan prin- 
cesse's visit to our City Hall to study educational matters. L'sual'y 
our leading daily is very quick to ward off any serious danger to 
the taxpayers. But what could be more omnious than this evident 
attempt of Afghanistan to steal School Superintendent Roncovieri 
from us. Princess Fatima's explanation that she is on her » 
England to place her sons in college is all bluff. She is here as 
the secret agent of her cousin the Ameer of Afghanistan, to obtain 
the finest jewels of our municipal sen ice for his govern- 
galaxy. How can we replace them? Our plasterers and hodcar- 
riers are all out on strike and will not take a cent less than $13 



a day. None of them will serve on the Board of Education, and 

all the hungry college professors are ineligible, being able to read 

and write without falling in a fit of epilepsy. 

This all grows out of the Adicott-Roncovieri affair. When the 

Ameer read of it, his first words were, "Go get Roncki. Don't let 

money stop us. We hold up John Bull for a million a year now 

in subsidies. Make it a billion if necessary, but get me a choice 

bunch of Ameer Jimrolph's municipal stars." So the Princess 

Fatima is in our midst camouflaged as a fond mother taking her 

boys to Cambridge. We shall lose not only gems of the school 

department but of others. Tim Reardon of the Board of Works 

will be paving the Khyber Pass with diamonds for the Ameer first 

thing we know, and all the horses and carts will be on their way 

across the Pacific. Money is no object in Afghanistan as nobody 

works. It's all graft. 

* * * 

-Governor Stephens should call a special session of the Cali- 



fornia Legislature at once and shut out the Afghans as well as the 
Japs. 

* * * 

Proposed increases in salaries about the city hall are not in 

particularly fine fettle at the present time, the Board of Supervisors 
denying about $40,000 in raises at its meeting last Monday. It is 
contended that as the cost of living has declined, which it has, that 
salary increases are not in order. The Finance Committee of the 
Supervisors is beginning to see the handwriting on the wall and has 
taken an economical streak. But salary increase plans do not die 
easily and it is said that the subject will be a matter of further con- 
sideration at the meeting next Monday. It would seem wise policy 
for the Supervisors not to raise salaries of some to the level of 
others, which is the plea in the present case, but the salaries of the 
higher paid should be reduced to the levels of those who are seeking 
an increase. 



More Man-Made Law — "Oh, my dear, your skirts are creeping 
up!" "Well, you know how it is — man wants but little here be- 
low, nor wants that little long." — Bulletin (Sydney.) 




^he treasured 
secret of coffee- 
roasting- produce* 
the wondrous flavor 

©swells 

^^<NAIIONAl CREST 

Qffce 



San Francisco News Letter and 



Times Have Changed 

By ARTHUR L. LYONS. 

FINANCIAL difficulties of the Sacramento Union have been 
made public in the newspapers, as some creditors of the Pub- 
lisher Ben. C. Allen desire to have the business of the distressed 
journal placed in the hands of a receiver. 

The prolonged financial misfortunes of the Sacramento Union 
have attracted much attention amongst journalists. The newspaper 
is one of the oldest in California and figured in the early struggles 
for the political supremacy of the State, when the mining era was 
being displaced by the agricultural and the connection of the Far 
West with the Atlantic States by a transcontinental railroad, was the 
most important project before Californians. 

At that time Sacramento was the focus of political and com- 
mercial activity in Northern California by reason of its proximity 
to the mining population of the most productive districts. The pro- 
jectors of the scheme to connect California with the East by railroad 
were Sacramento business men, who had not yet become important 
figures outside of their local sphere. Naturally they met opposition. 
Local rivalries always partake of the uncompromising bitterness of 
civil war. The antagonistic know one another too well. There is 
little hero worship amongst neighbors. The grocer down Main 
Street, who perhaps desires to be mayor of a town cannot be ex- 
pected to exhibit enthusiasm for the success of the general merchant 
a block away, who has airy projects of making himself a railroad 
magnate. 

The Sacramento projectors of the Central Pacific Railroad had 
good reason to remember the biblical verse about a prophet not be- 
ing without honor, save in his own country. They received less of 
honor than discouragement from their business neighbors until their 
great project began to assume national prominence and the question 
of vast land grants became a subject for decision at Washington. 
It was a great project, the connection of California with the Atlantic 
States by rail and the elimination of the wilderness and desert. Its 
success demanded strong men and usually where a great opportunity 
is represented the giants arise. There were Titans in California in 
those early days, when the streams and canyons were being explored 
for gold and the route of a transcontinental railroad being mapped, 
regardless of mountains, forests and rivers. 

The new factors in State development, were building an effective 
political machine as well as a railroad and the Sacramento Union 
opposed them to the utmost. It was a fight to the finish. Eventually 
the Union passed into the ownership of the Central Pacific Railroad 
people. The owners of the "Union" had founded it on the old plan 
of American journals of their day, with more hope than coin. Under 
corporation ownership the Union had the usual fate. Various editors 
were tried with little or no difference. Some proved less expensive 
than others but none was a success. It had not yet become a well 
recognized fact in the newspaper business, that publications intend- 
ed as "mere organs" and luxuries that cannot be made to yield 
profit. 

Not that the Union under direct railroad interest was a badly 
managed newspaper. Technically it was a creditable sheet — care- 
fully edited and printed. Its news service was good but with all 
its mechanical advantages it lost money for the owners, and never 
seems to have got over the habit, as Publisher Ben. C. Allen's present 
unsatisfactory financial condition indicates. 

Can a newspaper which has once had a popularity and enjoyed 
success be remodeled and successfully switched around like an ice 
cream soda stand transformed to a delicatessen store? That is a 
very interesting conundrum for newspapermen. Is a newspaper an 
entity which can never be restored to its energetic prime, no matter 
how many new glands may be surgically transplanted in its 
make-up? 

In the days when the Union was started, a few printers could 
combine and perhaps establish a newspaper. The New York Her- 
ald was started in that style. Old Horace Greely most famous of 
American editors began in a very humble way. So did several cel- 
ebrated Californians. But the cost of everything has increased and 
the newspaper business now requires large capital. 



One of the great difficulties is the smallness of the subscription 
prices of American newspapers. The price must be small or the 
circulation will not be large and newspapers depend for support on 
advertising patronage. That condition has reached such a state 
in America that when Lord Northcliffe, the great English publisher, 
was in America, a few years ago, his answer to the question what he 
saw most interesting in New York journalism was: 

"That American publishers are selling twenty-dollar pieces for 
fifteen dollars." 

It was much better then than now, as paper has advanced 
enormously. So have all costs, while the size of the publications 
have not been reduced. Wise economy will force reductions. The 
leading Paris journals contain only four pages yet some of them 
charge twenty francs a line for their classified advertising. Large 
display advertising, such as we are familiar with in America, is ab- 
solutely unknown in French papers. The gross incomes are small. 
What about the net profits? 



The shooting down of an innocent man by an officer of the 

law, as was the case last week, is entirely inexcusable. The slaying 
episode which occurred in a San Francisco garage shocked the com- 
munity. Officers of the law laid in wait for a supposed automobile 
thief, a customer of the garage entered the place in the evening to 
store his machine and a member of his party was shot down in cold 
blood. Can anyone imagine such a thing? It is almost beyond hum- 
an belief that such an affair could even happen in the wildest imag- 
ination of a fiction writer, let alone in real life. Permitting armed 
officers to wear plain clothes on such a mission is another object of 
much criticism. Without a doubt this case needs the deepest invest- 
igation and proper punishment. 



An Old-Timer — A Cambridge undergraduate, contrary to regula- 
tions, was entertaining his sister, when they heard someone on the 
stairs. Hastily hiding his sister behind a curtain, he went to the 
door and confronted an aged man who was revisiting the scenes of 
his youth, and was desirous of seeing his old rooms. 

Obtaining permission, he looked round, and remarked, "Ah, yes. 
the same old room." Going to the window, he said, "The same old 
view;" and peeping behind the curtain, he exclaimed, "The same 
old game!" 

"My sister, sir," said the student. 

"Oh. yes," said the visitor, "the same old story!" — Tit Bits 

The EYE and the BRAIN 

Poor Memory, Headache, Dizziness, Weak, 
Infiamed, Smarting, Sensitive or Gluey 
Byes, Hosting Spots, Crusty or Granu- 
lated Eyelids, Astigmatism, Watery Eyes 
and inability to see objects clearly — all 
these -symptoms and many other ailments 
can be directly or indirectly attributed to 
EYE STRAIN 
TO RELIEVE THESE AILMENTS YOU 

MUST REMOVE THE CAUSE 
The latest and most scientific instruments 
are used in examining children's ryes and 
complicated cases of eye defects. 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

EXCLUSIVE EYESIGHT SPECIALIST 

Charter Member American Association of 

Opticians 

27 Years in San Francisco 

960 MARKET STREET 

Between Mason and Taylor 
SAN FRANCISCO 




BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old Poodle Dog 

Luncheon 75c 

Served Daily— 11 to 2 

Choose full-sized portions from large menu, 

which is changed every day. 

Excellent Food— Beautiful Environment 

Prompt Service 

French Dinner $1.50 

Including lax. week days and Sundays. 5 to 9 P. M. 

DANCING 

421 BUSH ST.. ABOVR KEARNY 
Phone Douglas 2411 



California Advertiser for July 2, 1921 



Life at Oxford 



By CHARLES F. GALLAGHER 

LIFE at an English University is so totally different from that of 
our American institutions that a brief description as to the 
methods of education may prove interesting to our readers: 
In the following six features the university of Oxford stands in 
marked contrast to universities out of England. (1) The College 
System. Before a person becomes a member of the university he 
must first of all become a member of one of the twenty-one colleges 
or two halls; and the moment he ceases to be a member of one of 
these societies his actual membership of the university is also termin- 
ated. This means that the Oxford under-graduate is not left as a 
unit in a great body of two or three thousand, but is made a mem- 
ber of a much smaller body of perhaps eighty to two hundred mem- 
bers, and is therefore subject to closer personal scrutiny and to 
stronger influences of social opinion than would be possible in uni- 
versities differently constituted. It is true that the influence of this 
common life is partially discounted in the case of students from the 
public schools, where similar influences have already formed their 
character; but in the case of students from small schools or solitary 
homes the vigorous social life of a good college is wonderfully effici- 
cacious in converting the raw, diffident, or morose boy into the frank, 
self-reliant, and sociable man. (2) The Fellow-ship System. Form- 
erly every first-class man (and many in the second class) could count 
with certainty on his fellowship — that is, on a secure endowment 
(for a shorter or longer period) which would enable him to pursue 
his studies or to prepare himself lor professional life. Some few of 
these fellowships are still open to competition; but the regulations 
of the Commissions of 1877, which suppressed many fellowships to 
found professorships coinciding with the loss of more than a third 
of annual revenue of the colleges from the fall in agricultural rents, 
have seriously reduced their number and, so far, deprived Oxford of 
her best feature. The scholarship system — i. e. endowments held 
during the time of an undergraduate's course, is not so distinctive of 
Oxford; though such endowments are more numerous and valuable 
in Oxford than in any other university. (3) The System of Tuition. 
In foreign universities the work of tuition is undertaken by university 
teachers — i. e. by the professors. In Oxford the professoriate has 
withdrawn itself from any real share in this work. and. so far as con- 
cerns the mass of Oxford students, might be entirely suppressed with- 
out in any way affecting their studies. In all ordinary subjects, 
speaking generally, the professors have long ceased to give system- 
atic instructions, and have at most expounded some small, and to 
the ordinary student often unnecessary, point in their subject. It is 
plain thai from two lectures a week, delivered through at most three 
terms of seven weeks each, a student can Irani little in language, in 
history, in philosophy, or in science. The work of tuition which in 
other universities is discharged by the professors is in Oxford dis- 
charged by the college lecturers. Formerly a college lecturer lectured 
only to the men of his own college, a system which was terribly unfair 
to the students of an inefficient college; of late years ihe better col- 
lege lectures have become practically open to the whole university 
and especially in lectures connected with the honor schools, fre- 
quently without fee. The college lecturers of Oxford are therefore the 
professors of Oxford, except that they are not called by that name, 
and that they are paid by their college, not by the university. At the 
same time, the old Oxford tradition of a college tutor devoting himseli 
to the interests ol the men of his own college still continues, 
from attendance at lectures, a large portion of Oxford tuition con- 
sists in taking compositions, translations, papers, and essays either 



individually or in very small classes to one's tutor or lecturer. This 
individual instruction involves, it is true, an expenditure of time and 
talent which seems out of all proportion to the results it achieves, 
yet the happiest memories of Oxford men are probably those half- 
hours or hours in their tutor's room when their individual faults 
were exposed by the large scholarship and their individual eccen- 
tricities corrected by the unsparing but good-natured chaff of a kindly 
mentor. One result of the remarkable improvement in college tui- 
tion of the last few years has been the almost total disappearance of 
the "private coach" from the honor work of the university. Private 
coaching continues to a great extent in the pass schools, partly be- 
cause some candidates have been very badly taught at school and are 
below the level of their fellows, but chiefly because candidates are 
too idle to read by themselves. Quite a recent development of the 
professoriate deserves notice here. When the university has resident 
in it a man of special reputation in a given branch of study, the com- 
mon university fund has of late years appointed him to lecture for 
three or five years on his own subject. In some cases undergraduate, 
Oxford has not seconded this by attendance at these lectures, but the 
approval of maturer scholars has followed this public recognition of 
learning. Such lecturers are known by the new title of "Readers." 
(4) The Discipline. The discipline of Oxford is much stricter than 
that of any university outside England. Within college the govern- 
ment of the college deans, without college the vigilance of the proc- 
tors and their deputies, repress disorder and immorality. Sad as is 
the waste of young lives in Oxford, no one who has known a laxer 
discipline can refuse to recognize that if a man goes to the bad in 
Oxford he does it of his own wilful and obstinate choice. (5) At 
the same time, Oxford must be marked for the excessive luxury and 
idleness of its students. The common life of the colleges has this 
disadvantage, that it requires considerable force of character for a 
poor student to live in proportion to his poverty; there being every 
inducement for a man of weak character to live after the fashion 
of his richer and more careless contemporaries. Hence the son of a 
man of £400 a year often spends during his course at the rate of the 
son of £4000 a year, and begins his afterlife under a heavy burden 
of debt. And lastly, amusements of different kinds, football, rowing, 
cricket, tennis, billiards, cardplaying. debating, the theatre, to say 
nothing of the baser kinds, such as betting, wines, worrying rats and 
rabbits, are thought of. talked of. and pursued by many undergradu- 
ates, till barely an hour a day in the eight weeks of term is left for 
any serious or intellectual pursuit. For this devotion to amusements 
the public schools are largely responsible. (6) The Oxford course 
is entirely out of touch with the professional education of the country. 
The Oxford undergraduate, entering the university at nineteen or 
twenty, finds himself at twenty-three or twenty-four, after the expen- 
diture of £800 or £1000. and the formation of idle habits and ex- 
pensive tastes, with his whole life to begin afresh. If he wishes to 
enter the church he has generally to spend some yeas in a theolog- 
ical college; if he desires to go to the bar he mud proceed to the 
Inns of Court; if he intends to practice medicine the long and ex- 
pensive training of the London hospital schools hr.s to be gone 
through. 

Scholars and exhibitioners are admitted to a college without spe- 
cial matriculation examination; intending commoners are examined 
in some form or another by the tutors. In some colleges it is 
enough to have passed Responsions. or equivalent examination; in 
others a further test is imposed; and few colleges accept candidates 
in the hope that they will in the course of a term or two pass Resp- 
onsions. But the practice of college varies so much from year to 
year that personal inquiry about the exact nature of the entrance 
examination is always advisable and generally necessary. 



San Francisco Law School 

Third FIixt ('ail Building 

:■ enrollment art being recei 

;lM[JUe 



FACIAL DEFECTS 
Crooked Noses, Lines of Age, Etc. 

(Facial Reconstruction) 

H. EARLE COGER, A. M. 

797 Bush St. Office Hours I to 4 

San Fran Phone Sutter 3617 



The Smart Set Beauty Shop 

MF- - « t PRIHt 
Sen Fmtkiko Dislnrwtor for 
Ma*. U FW* B**«m PTp4f 



Xar 

Scal»3< 



- ■ 
- , 



10 



San Francisco News Letter and 





financial; 




ROGER BABSON SAYS that the country 
is fundamentally 0. K. but that temporarily 
its business is ill. And this is true. Just at 
the moment of writing, the exchange situa- 
tion is improving very slowly, the Latin Am- 
erican situation has improved to a very great 
extent, the condition in the Far East, in Mal- 
aysia and India is bad for American busi- 
ness and business at home is in statu quo. 
The exchange situation is responding to the 
improved conditions, due to our relations and 
the relations of the rest of the civilized na- 
tions with Germany having improved. Ger- 
many has begun to pay her debts and is not 
nearly as much of a stumbling block as she 
has been in the immediate past as to a re- 
sumption of normal conditions. Latin Am- 
erican conditions have been bettered through 
the shifting of the balance of trade and Latin 
America should soon be in a condition to 
begin buying in this country again at a 
normal rate. That is, this should happen 
unless Congress in its wisdom or unwisdom, 
passes a tariff that will kill off all hope of 
doing business abroad on a basis of reciproc- 
ity. In the Far East, in Malaysia, and in 
India, we cannot hope to retain our markets 
unless we enter into an energetic competition 
with England by the establishing, at every 
important port, of a branch of an American 
financial institution which will issue letters 
of credit on the demand of those who wish 
to trade with this country. British capital 
isn't going to do this and today letters of 
credit are being refused those who would 
import into India goods of American manu- 
facture. There is no law to compel a British 
financial institution to issue letters of credit 
to anyone, if the officers of the institution 
do not see fit to so do. British financial 
houses have come to the conclusion that the 
rest of the world owes the United States 
quite enough as it is and that is unwise to 
make that debt greater and that, instead 
every endeavor on the part of British inter- 
ests should be bent toward paying the debt 
already owed without creating new ones. 
* * * 

A great many so-called cures for the pres- 
ent state of affairs have been made public. 
Mr. Babson discourses very learnedly on the 
subject. We must return to the normal and 
the only way to reach this desired state is 
for the whole world to energetically pursue 
the idea that all differences must be com- 
pounded, that war must be stopped every- 
where, that the debts of other nations to the 
United States must be refunded, that propa- 
ganda, making enemies, should be frowned 
down, and that every nation seriously do 
consider the establishment of a permanent 
world peace. 

We cannot hope for world peace or an era 
of content and prosperity when there is war 



in Silesia, in Poland, in Germany, in Ireland, 
in Turkey, in Mesopotamia, in Persia, in 
China and in other countries. All of these 

war conditions must be ironed out. 

* * * 

The ironing out process is largely a finan- 
cial question and a question of the balance 
of power. The nations standing in the way 
of arriving at normalcy must get out of the 
way. All of these differences must be settled 
and settled right, along the lines of justice 
between the nations having differences and 
with a due regard to the rights of the world 
at large. 

* * * 

In the United States we have our own par- 
ticular puzzles to solve and these should 
have devoted to their solution the best minds 
in the country. In the final analysis it is 
really the people who rule in this country. 
This isn't always good for the people. But 
it is a fact that they do rule. Therefore it 
is the people who should understand the con- 
dition facing our manufacturers today. We 
have already referred to the fact that we are 
producing more than we can consume. We 
must EXPORT. In order to export we must 
have a financial program which will provide 
the money on which our export business is 
to be built. We must import, too. We 
must INVEST ABROAD all available surplus 
American capital. Export, import and in- 
vestment — that is a big program and the 
difficulty lies in the fact that an educational 
campaign of vast magnitude is necessary 
to make the people understand the necessity 
for the expansion of our foreign trade. 

The Bank of Italy threw open the doors 
of its magnificent building to the public this 
week. The success of this great financial in- 
stitution has been marked. And its march 
has been a steady one. Much of that suc- 
cess has been due to its style and method 
of publicity. The directors of the Bank of 
Italy believe enthusiastically in the use of 
printer's ink. They have always very clev- 
erly taken advantage of every means, in a 
decent way, of giving their bank publicity. 
They have not been what may be called lav- 
ish advertisers but they have continuously 
used the best means of reaching all classes 
of people and they have widened the serv- 
ice a bank may render its clientage. San 
Francisco has many fine banks and most of 
these are believers in publicity. Practically 
none, however, make as judicious a use of 
every avenue to reach the eye and ear of the 

people as the Bank of Italy. 

* * * 

The First National Bank and First Federal 
Trust Company opened its palatial quarters 
to inspection in the past week. The sight 
was one to be remembered for many a year 



to come. The interior of the marvelously 
beautiful banking house was one mass of 
magnificent flowers. Words fail in which to 
render justice to the taste displayed and to 
describe the beauties of this largest banking 
salon in San Francisco. It is well worth the 
time of anyone to visit. 

The building strike and the shipping strike 
still has a great effect on the general con- 
dition in San Francisco. A more optimistic 
attitude and less crepe hanging by some of 
the merchants and bankers would go a very 
long way toward curing the attendant dull- 
ness. 

* ¥ * 

INSURANCE— Recently the idea has been 
broached that there is a likelihood of a lack 
of water in San Francisco in case of a big 
fire or of two fires calling for the maximum 
amount of water for extinguishing purposes. 
It is something that should have the attention 
of all thoughtful insurance men and of the 
public in general. That a lack of water, if 
it should prove to be a fact, might mean 
a spread of fire goes without saying but the 
public should bear in mind that a scarcity of 
water, or the possible lack of water, also 
means that insurance rates will eventually 
have to go up. It is not necessary to have 
any fear of a lack of water in those districts 
where the reserve high pressure prevails and 
where provision has been made to meet the 
contingency of a great conflagration. There 
are unprotected districts in San Francisco, 
however, where the pressure in the regular 
mains might be drawn on to such an extent 
by a big fire that a lack of water to meet 
the case of a fire in another locality of the 
city might possibly ensue. 

Some time ago, we spoke of the necessity 
of protection for the farmer against loss of 
crops through rain. Now, we are told that 
an investigation is going on with a view to 
obtaining statistical information of a reliable 
nature in order to establish if protection 
could be granted between certain dates at a 
cost making such insurance possible and 
profitable, to the companies and a real pro- 
tection to the producer of fruits. 

SHIPPING — The number of ships enter- 
ing and clearing from the port is increasing 
and there is more activity along the water- 
front, although business is far from normal. 
It was surprising to most of the shipping 
people to see the big Japanese liner of the 
Toyo line come in with so many passengers. 
It has been predicted that this vessel was en- 
tirely too large for the trans-Pacific trade 
and that she would be shy several hundred 
of a full list. It was not thought that she 
would come in with more than three hundred 
and fifty passengers. It now remains to be 
seen what her return list is to be like. It is 
quite probable that there will be several 
hundred fewer passengers West-bound than 
came in on the initial trip of the vessel to 
this port. The success of such vessels de- 
pends on whether the American public is 
educated, through profuse publicity, as to the 
beauty and value of a trip to the Orient. 



California Advertiser for July 2, 1921 



11 



Very few of us know of the picturesqueness 
and business value of Japan. China, French- 
Indio-China, the Dutch East Indies, the 
Philippines and the rest of the Asian coun- 
tries in general and the only way to make 
travel over the Pacific attractive to the peo- 
ple of the United States and the rest of the 
world is through the medium of a well man- 
aged and continued publicity. That kind of 

publicity does not now exist. 
¥ * ¥ 

MINING — Tonopah is still in the throes of 
the miner's strike and there has been some 
violence which in turn has called for the 
presence of detachments of the Nevada State 
police. There has been a resumption of ac- 
tivity in many mines in California but no 
great amount of development will be made 
until Congress passes some sort of a measure 
granting relief to the gold miner. Such a 
law is likely to pass at this session. Another 
deterrent factor is found in the reluctance 
of capitalists to invest at this time and this 
applies particularly to mining. 



Pacific Gas Company's Annual Report 

In the volume of its business, the Pacific 
Gas and Electric Company, with $34,475,- 
372 of gross operating revenues during 
1920, now ranks as the second largest gas 
and electric company in the United States. 
The Company's statement that its plants and 
properties account at the close of the year 
1920 stood at $164,655,623 should also be 
extremely reassuring to the Company's se- 
curity holders. Of this amount, $91,875,- 
790, or almost 60 per cent, represents cash 
actually invested in new construction and 
the acquisition of properties in the last 15 
years, as shown in detail in the report. 

The Company has either completed, or 
will bring 8,741 horsepower of additional 
hydro-electric installation and of additional 
electric energy in its steam stations. In this 
and other new constiuction. $11,314,609 
was expended during the year. The ooinion 
is expressed that when the new hydro-electric 
plants on the Pit and Stanislaus rivers, now 
under construction, are placed in actual op- 
eration, substantial economics should resuit. 
The Company's customers are already re- 
ceiving the benefit in reduced surcharges of 
some of the economies anticipated in this 
report. The amount of the Company's taxes 
in 1920 was $2,558,799 or 21.69 per cent 
of its net operating income. 

Conservation in the management of the 
financial affairs of the corporation is indicat- 
ed by the fact that in the last fifteen years. 
less than one-third of the net earnings ml 
paid out in cash dividends, no less than $40.- 
726.000 of net earnings having been used to 
retire bonds, reinvested in the property 
expended for replacement and rehabilitation. 
6.800 employees and 677 motor vehicles are 
employed in the operation of the Company's 
various departments. 



He had been spending a very convivial 
evening with some friends and was feeling 
particularly happy. At last his friends thought 
it was time he went home, so they assisted 
him downstairs and called a taxi. Opening 



the cab door they bade him good night and 
pushed him in — but, unfortunately, with 
such good will that he was hurled right 
across the cab, and the force opened the 
other door, and he fell into the roadway. 



The bump having somewhat restored his 
wits, he slowly picked himself up, staggered 
towards the driver, and feeling in his pocket 
for some money, muttered, H-how m-much is 
that, cabby? 



COMBINED STATEMENT OF CONDITION 

HEAD OFFICE AND BRANCHES 

BANK OF ITALY 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL. ' TRUST 

HEAD OFFICE, SAN FRANCISCO 

MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 
June 30, 1921 



RESOURCES 

First Mortgage Loans on Real Estate {49,056,538.34 

Other Loans and Discounts Mi.lniS. 161.90 



United states Bonds and Certificates of Indebtedness .flu. 103.184.39 

State, County, and Municipal Bonds „ 12,966,564.93 

Other Bonds - _ 8,697,639.79 

Shirk in Federal Reserve Bank 366,750.00 



TOTAL U. S. ANT) OTHER SECURITIES.. 



Hue from Federal Reserve Bank _ s 6,641,876.78 

Cash 'lei Due fr Ithei Banks 10,974,414.49 

TOTAL CASH AND DUE PROM HANKS 

Banking Premises, Furniture, Fixtures and 

Safe Deposit Vaults 

other Heal Estate Owned 



Customers' Liability under Letters of Credit and 
Acceptances - „ , 

■ ' Earned bi llei I d 

E loyees' Pension Eund 

< ither Resoul eei 



Tl IT \l. RESI IURCES 



l lEPI ISITS 

'ii I 'aid m 



i.i \iiii.itii:s 



10, .»" 

■ •"' 

2.290,386.54 



J105,121,700.24 



$38.4 10,139:11 



(17,516,291 .'7 

$ 6,173.421.53 
306,609.81 

1,875,773.67 
1,062,372.27 

1.IMI 

218,766.08 
..1170,216,063.98 

si 18,709,272.13 



Undivided Profits 

TOTAL CAPITAL SURPLUS \ N I • UNDIVIDED PROFITS* 
1 ilvldends Unpaid :, 1 1,980.0 1 

1 ilscounti Collected but not Earni .1 

■ I for Taxes and Interest Accrued 

redit, Acceptances and •I'm, 

rvc Bank (U. s Obligations) 1,500, ,00 



SI 70. 'J I 



and interest payable to end ••! half-year have 1 n di 

m above state nt 

A 1- Qlannlnl and \\\ it. Williams, being separately duly sworn each for himself, 
says thai sali innlnl is President and thai W. 1: Williams Is Cashlei 

'■"" k "' 'i' 1 11 above* m< ery statement contained 

is true of his ..wn knowledge and b 

A P, dlANNINL 
W. It. WILLIAMS. 

Subsi rlbed ami sworn to before me this SOth day •■( .lune. UJi. 

TIM IH \s s. BURNES, N 

THE STORY OF OUR GROWTH 

\- Sh-.w 1, 
December, 1904 .... 

December, 1908 .... 

December, 1912 
December, 1916 



December, 1919 

December, 1920 

July, 1921 $170,215,063.98 



$285.4 ib.'f 

$2,574,004.90 

$11,228,814.56 

. . $39,805,995.24 

$137,900,700.30 

$157,464,865.08 



NUMBER OF DEPOSITORS 267,206 

Savings Deposits made on or before July 1, 1921, will earn interest 
from July 1, 1921. 



12 



San Francisco News Letter and 




oabt 




^3- 



THE wedding of Miss Elizabeth Maltby 
and Mr. Ellis Walton Hedges was an 
unusually pretty affair Tuesday at the 
Maltby home at Concord. 

The marriage ceremony was performed by 
Bishop William Ford Nichols at 5 o'clock, 
before about one hundred and fifty relatives 
and friends. 

The bridegroom is the son of Mrs. Lelia 
Butler Stoddard and a grandson of the late 
C. C. Butler of San Francisco, who was cne 
of the largest land owners of the city. Mr. 
Hedges is a nephew of Mrs. Butler Breeden. 
He was graduated from the University of 
California this year. 

The young couple will motor through the 
northern part of the state for their honey- 
moon and will live in Claremont, where they 
have built a bungalow. 
Luncheons 

Mrs. George McGowan gave a luncheon 

at the Fairmont Saturday, attending the mat- 
inee in the afternoon with her guests. 
Mrs. Stanleigh Arnold and her sister- 
in-law. Mrs. William Kent Jr., gave a lunch- 
eon and bridge party Friday at the Kent 
place at Kentville. 

Mrs. R. P. Schwerin gave a luncheon 

and bridge party at her home in San Mateo 
Tuesday as a compliment to Mrs. Edwin P. 
Earl of Los Angeles, who is the house guest 
of Mr. and Mrs. George T. Marye. A dozen 
guests shared Mrs. Schwerin's hospitality. 
Teas 

Miss Blanche Burbank gave a bridge-tea 

at her apartments in the Plaza Hotel on 
Tuesday. Mrs. James Stewart Sampson, 
who recently arrived from Salt Lake City, 
Utah, was the motif for the affair. 
A number of the young people who at- 
tended the polo games at the Pclo Club on 




T T 139-153 GEARY ST. 

fj m a p tjlpp ar>el 

ron CxJomen 

and u\jss&S 



SKjle aiYcl Quality 

u/itkout DxtpaVaJarvce 
O 




Sunday motored to the home of Mrs. Jean 
Saint de Cyr and enjoyed an hour of swim- 
ming in the private pool of the St. Cyr 
country home. The host served tea to his 
guests later, the tea tables being set on the 
lovely terraces. 

Mr. Saint de Cyr gave a dinner party on 
Friday night, entertaining a score of guests. 

Mrs. Charles H. Davis (Frances 

Sloney) was hostess at an attractive bridge 
tea given at her home last Friday afternoon, 
Sunday motored to the home of Mr. Jean 
ville from Los Angeles, who is the house 
guest of her sister. Miss Katherine Stoney. 
Dinners 

General and Mrs. William M. Wright 

and their debutante daughter, Miss Margery 
Wright, will arrive this week from Wash- 
ington, D. C, and will be complimented at a 
dinner given by Mr. and Mrs. George T. 
Marye on Sunday, July 3, at their home in 
Burlingame. 

Mr. and Mrs. Marye are at present enter- 
taining as their house guest Mrs. Edwin P. 
Earl of Los Angeles, for whom a number of 
social affairs are being given. They expect 
the Swiss Minister, M. Peter and Mme. 
Peter from Washington, D. C. to arrive 
shortly. 

Mrs. George D. Boyd assembled some 

of her friends and relatives in her home in 
San Rafael Tuesday night in celebration of 
her birthday. Mrs. Boyd's birthday parties, 
in the years past have always been delightful 
reunions of a coterie that is the life of the 
Marin county set. 

House Parties 

One of the interesting house parties of 

this, week end will be given by Mr. and 
Mrs. William T. Sesnon at their beautiful 
country home, Pina Alto, in the Santa Cruz 
mountains. 

The ball which marked the coming out of 
the Misses Barbara and Katherine Sesnon, 
the popular daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Ses- 
non, will be remembered as one of the bril- 
liant affairs of last season. 

The coming house party is being given for 
the young friends of the Sesnons, and about 
fifty guests will motor down from San 
Francisco on Friday and remain until Tues- 
day. An old-fashioned barbecue will be 
given on July Fourth in the gardens which 
surround the house. 

Mr. and Mrs. Seward McNear gave a 

house party over the week end at their home 

in San Rafael, taking their guests to the 

Italian dinner and dance given at the Lagu- 

nitas Country Club . for the benefit of the 

Hill Farm Preventorium for Children. 

Dances 

A dinner and dance was given last Sat- 



urday evening by the officers of the battle- 
ship "Texas" on board. The ship's boats 
conveying the guests. 

The supper dance given at the Presidio 

Ladies' Club on Thursday evening was one 
of the largest affairs of the summer in army 
circles. The clubrooms were specially deco- 
rated for the occasion, the national colors 
predominating. 

A merry evening party in the form of a 

picnic and dance will be given July 4th, at 
the Menlo Park Country Club, and will draw 
its share of San Francisco society. The 
arrangements are in the hands of Mrs. 
Charles McCormick, Mr. Covington Pringle 
and Mr. Samuel Pond. 
Births 

Mr. and Mrs. Daulton Mann are being 

congratulated on the birth of a son, which 
occurred Saturday at Mount Zion Hospital. 
The baby is a niece of Mrs. Stuart Haldorn 
and the first grandchild of Mr. Wellington 
Gregg. 

In Town and Out 

Mr. and Mrs. Willard Chamberlain and 

Master Cranston Chamberlain, who have 
taken temporary apartments at the Fairmont 
Hotel, will move July 1 to Burlingame, 
where they have engaged the cottage of Mr. 
and Mrs. Samuel Knight. The Chamberlains 
will be here until September when they re- 
turn to their home in Pittsburgh. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. K. Boisit of Chicago 

are visiting their daughter, Mrs. Byington 
Ford, at Del Monte, where they plan to 
spend the summer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Crocker are 

making a stay at the Del Monte Lodge to 
enjoy golf, fishing and boating. 
Mrs. Warren D. Spieker of San Fran- 
cisco is enthusiastic over the adobe home 
she has taken in Monterey for the summer. 
It is the house where Consul Larkin, first 
representative of the United States in Cali- 
fornia, made his residence in the days when 
Mexico owned the state. 
Ambassador Peter of Switzerland is ex- 
pected soon in California from Washington, 
with Mme. Peter, and they will be guests 



Tk 



FOR 



iHanagemenl of 

Halsey E. Manwaring 




California Advertiser for July 2, 1921 



13 



of Mr. and Mrs. George T. Marye at Bur- 
lingame. 

Mrs. Clara Catherwood Darling will 

move from town to her country place at 
Los Altos the second week in July. She has 
spent the winter at the Hillcrest. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Schilling and 

Miss Sara Coffin are spending a few weeks 
at the McCloud River Country Club. Mrs. 
Schilling's niece. Miss Florence Martin, re- 
turned on Sunday to her home in San 
Rafael, from the McCloud, where she spent 
a fortnight with the Schillings. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Tenney returned 

to their home in Honolulu Wednesdty after 
a few weeks' stay at the Fairmont and at 
the Yosemite Valley. Mrs. Tenney gave an 
informal luncheon and bridge party at the 
Fairmont Club Monday. 

Miss Wilhelmina Tenney, who came from 
the South to join her parents here, has re- 
turned to her ranch in Lower California. 

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas McBryde, Mr. 

and Mrs. William Henry Smith, Miss Mollie 
McBryde and Miss Mary Dennis Searles left 
Tuesday by motor for the Tahoe region, to 
remain a fortnight, with headquarters at 
Fallen Leaf Lodge. Miss Mary Dennis 
Searles recently has been visiting in Brook- 
dale as the guest of Miss Jean Wakefield, 
who is passing the summer there. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Klink and their 

daughters. Miss Carroll and Miss Betty 
Klink, will spend the week-end and Fourth 
of July at Del Monte. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Watson are at 

their town house for the summer, and their 
country place in Atherton is being occupied 
by the matron's brother and sister in law. 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Pease Jr. Over July 
4, Mr. and Mrs. Watson will go to the 
Menlo Golf and Country Club, where they 
have been enjoying many week-ends, and 
they will take with them as their guests 
over the holidays Dr. and Mrs. George Eb- 
right and Dr. and Mrs. Frank Rohner. 

Dr. and Mrs. Herbert C. Moffitt arrived 

Tuesday from the East after a visit of sev- 
eral weeks on the Atlantic Coast. Miss Mary 
Martin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter S. 
Martin, who has been at school in New 
York, returned with Dr. and Mrs. Moffitt. 

Commander Wallace Berthols. U. S. N.. 

has been ordered to the war college at New- 
port, and will leave for his new station in a 
week. Mrs. Bertholf will join him at New- 
port a little later in the summer. 

Mrs. Henry T. Scott left Thursday for 

the East and Europe to pass the summer 
abroad. She is going to London where she 
has engaged the town house of Mrs. Regin- 
ald Brook (Miss Rulh Holliday of San 
Francisco) for two months. It is a delight- 
ful arrangement for Mrs. Scott, who has 
many friends in England tor whom she will 
entertain in the course of the summer; and 
with the Brooke house is rented also the 
entire staff of domestics, so that none of 
the inconveniences of establishing a house- 
hold in a foreign country will be encount- 



ered. Mrs. Scott will sail the middle of 
July for England. 

Mrs. Anson P. Hotaling is en route 

home from Europe and is due here this 
week. She is coming home to enjoy the 
holidays with her son, who is West on a 
vacation from Harvard, where he has been 
taking a commercial course. 

Dr. and Mrs. Stanley Stillman, who 

have been attending the meeting of the 
American Surgical Association at Toronto, 
arrived in San Francisco on Saturday with 
Miss Lisa Stillman, who has been attending 
Vassar, where she will return to resume her 
studies in the autumn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jared How and two chil- 
dren have taken the Warner house in Pacific 
Grove and will entertain a number of their 
friends from San Mateo. 
Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Baldwin of Up- 
lands have taken the Arthur Hill Vincent 
house at Pebble Beach for the summer and 
are now located there. 

Among the prominent Southern Cali- 
fornia folk who were at Del Monte last week 
were Mrs. John D. Spreckels and Mrs. R. G. 
Dillwoith of Coronado; Mr. and Mrs. Ken- 
neth Hunter and daughter of Los Angeles; 
Mr. and Mrs. Roy H. Pickford of Coronado; 
Mrs. H. M. Roland of Los Angeles and Dr. 
V. Bernard Herbst of Pasadena. 

Intimations 

Mr. Ernest Peixotto, the San Francisco 

artist, who has spent much of the past few 
years in Europe, has been decorated by 
France and made a chevalier of the Legion 
of Honor for war work. Mr. Peixotto is a 
brother of Mr. Edgar Peixotto. Major Syd- 
ney and Miss Jessica Peixotto. 

Miss Florence Russell, who is using the 

stage name of Miss Jane Atherton. has com- 
pleted her work with Douglas Fairbanks. 
She took the part of a lady in waiting to 
Anne of Austria in "The Three Musketeers" 
and acted almost continuously for seven 
weeks. 

The friends of Mrs. Joseph Oliver To- 

bin are grieved to hear of her illness. Mrs. 
Tcbin is at her home in Burlingame. 

Mis. William Babcock has bought the 

C. A. Thayer house in San Rafael and will 
make her home there. She has been in the 
East and Europe for a year, and returned 
to San Francisco a lew weeks ago. Before 
she went away Mrs. Babcock sold her home 
in San Rafael to the Dominican convent. 

Miss Kinkelin, who is an exceptionally 
pi city girl of the Ian -haired, sunny type, is 
a niece of Mrs. Fuller. She is a daughter 
of the late Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kinkelin. 
a prominent Marin county family. 

Mr. and Mrs John J Mitchell are at 

Feather River Inn. Mrs. Mitchell was Mi-s 
Lohta Armour of Chicago. They are West 
on their honeymoon. The newlyweds are 
lovers of outdoor li!e and sports of the 
woods and streams. Consequently the fish- 
ing and hunting in the wildwood country 
occupies much of their time. 




\T FGAbCIX 

O One of Uie worlds Sreatkotek J 

Facing Union ScJuAe J 

\ SAN FRAHCISCO CALIFORNIA 

MURAL ROOM 

WEEK DAY LUNCHEONS 

Si OO Per Plate 

TABLE D'HOTE DINNER 

$1 SO Per Plate 




J. E. BIRMINGHAM 

* * * 

PALACE HOTEL 

* * * 

JEWELS 

* * * 

REMODELING 

* * * 

UNIQUE DESIGNS 
» * * 

FINE JEWELRY 

* * * 

EXPERT 



Main Corridor 

* * # 

Opposite Rose Room 

* * * 

In Platinum 

* * * 

Old Styles Into New 

* * * 

Time-Keeping Watches 

* * * 

Of AH Descriptions 

* * * 

Repair Work 



ELECTROLYSIS 

Eye-brows arched and moles, warts and su- 
perfluous hair permanently removed by my 
latest improved multiple needle machine. 
Work guaranteed. 

MADAM STIVER 

133 Geary St.. Whitney Building. Suite 721 

Phone Douglas 5232 

Oakland. F.rsl Nat. Bank Bids. 

Suite 424. Phone Oakland 2521 



A TREATMENT FOR THE SCALP 
AND HAIR. ScienhBcally correct, cowne- 
tically perfect, established and conducted by 
American Hospital Nurses, unqualifiedly en- 
dorsed and used by Eminent Physicians. 

THE FRANCES FOX INSTITUTE 

For the Sci ■ Hair 

Sro 506 CmcaoRasl fall Plxoe Sonei 5 1 ' 8 

irket & P tt S:»-. Saa Fiaobsco 



14 



San Francisco News Letter and 



^&t0l710l>jlQ 




Breaking in a New Car 

In "bre; king in" the engine of a new car, 
it is better to supply too much oil to the eng- 
ine than not enough. If all the bearings are 
thoroughly lubricated during the first five 
hundred miles and the oil in the crank case 
is then replaced with fresh oil. the life of the 
engine will be materially increased as com- 
pared with the life of an engine which was 
not thoroughly lubricated during the "break- 
ing in" period. 

Many experienced automobile men, when 
"breaking in" the engine of a new car on 
the road, add about a quart of lubricating oil 
to every five gallons of gasoline put in the 
gasoline tank. The oil that is carried into the 
cylinders with the gasoline goes directly to 
the cylinder walls and insures thorough lub- 
rication of the cylinder walls from the start. 



Worth Remembering 

Drive slowly at bridges and at culverts. A 
bad rut or a stone in the road may throw 
your car against the structure. 

When attempting to pass another vehicle 
going in the same direction, start turning 
out (to the left) at least 75 feet to the rear. 



If you get up too close your view of the 
road ahead is obstructed and you may turn 
directly in front of another car coming to- 
ward you. When you have passed a car do 
not cut back into the road nor slow down 
too soon. 

Always be careful when backing. Sound 
horn three times; signal other cars, and look 
back (not ahead) to see where you are go- 
ing. Mirrors are valuable at all times. 

Clean windshields give you a clear view 
ahead. Every car should have a secondary 
windshield (rain visor) or windshield wiper 
which will clear the driver's view. 

When driving, do not attempt to carry on 
a conversation with others in the car. Small 
children should preferably sit in the rear of 
the car, they should never be held in or be- 
tween the arms of the driver. Safe driving 
demands your undivided attention. 



Be sure and signal when driving toward 
or away from the curb. You should shut off 
the engine, remove the ignition key, and set 
the emergency brake, when leaving the car. 
Cramp the wheels securely to prevent the car 
from moving accidentally. 



Combines Tool Box and Work Bench 

The hinged lid of a new tool box for auto- 
mobile running boards is fitted with legs that 
enable it to be used as a work bench when 
opened. 



Effect of Poor Gasoline 

Much of the gasoline which is sold com- 
mercially today is of a comparatively poor 
grade. Unless the engine is well designed 
and the carburetor properly adjusted, the 
gasoline will not be completely vaporized 
when it enters the cylinders. A little of it, 
or in extreme cases, a considerable amount, 
may enter the cylinders as a liquid instead 
of a vapor. Instead of being burned, this 
liquid gasoline runs down the cylinder walls, 
past the piston rings and into the crank 
case. It not only wastes the oil off the cyl- 
inder walls, but in addition it thins the oil 
in the crank case and, reduces its lubricating 
value. If the engine is supplied with too 
rich a mixture so that any considerable 
amount of gasoline leaks past the pistons, 
this gasoline will replace the oil that is used 
and thus maintain the level of the oil in the 
crank case. When the crank-case oil gage 
is examined, it will indicate "full" although 
considerable of the lubricating oil has been 
used. In such a case the diluted oil should 
be drained from the crank case and new oil 
supplied. Otherwise, there is danger of burn- 
ing out the engine bearings and completely 
ruining the engine. 



Cool Bath Best For Car 

The car should never be washed in direct 
sunlight. If the operation is not carried out 
in the garage the vehicle should be in the 
shade while being washed. The direct rays 
of the sun striking on the water causes heat- 
ing, which tends to dull the finish. In the 
same way the hood should never be washed 
when it is hot, as directly after the run. 



Senator Key Pittman, of Nevada, has re- 
introduced in the United States Senate his 
bill calling for a one-license registration sys- 
tem. Senator Pittman's bill provides that 
when the owner of a motor vehicle has com- 
plied with all the licensing requirements of 
his own state he shall not be called upon to 
take out an additional license in any other 
state. 



Leaky Spark-Plugs 

Very often, after the wiring has been re- 
newed on a car, it will persist in misfiring. 
Frequently, the spark-plugs are worn and 
make a .poor fit in the cylinder head. 

This can be detected by squirting a little 
gasoline around the plug with the engine 
running. If bubbles rise, the plug is leaky. 
It should be removed and graphite applied 
in the threads, which will make its removal 
easy later on and at the same time will form 
a seal for the leak. 



The New Orleans and Lower Coast Rail- 
way is the most recent road to install a rail- 
way motor truck to replace a passenger train 
for service over a sixty-mile run from Al- 
giers to Buras, La. The internal combustion 
form of railroad transportation is a standard 
FWD truck chassis on which steel-flanged 
wheels have been substituted for the rubber- 
tired one and a passenger body mounted on 
the frame. With the exception of the use of 
the flanged wheels, the standard construction 
of the truck remains the same, the regular 
motor used in the truck for ordinary hauling 
requirements furnishing the power. 

The special passenger body on the car 
provides seating space for thirty-two persons. 
The entrance is from a side folding door on 
the forward end. The car is also equipped 
with Master Car Builder coupler and can be 
used for switching or hauling a trailer. 

When in Santa Clara Valley, see the Val- 
ley from the scenic electric lines. 

Trolley trips start from San Jose or Palo 
Alto. 

PENINSULA RAILWAY CO. 
San Jose, Cal. 



USE 

Associated Products 

"More Miles to the Gallon" 



Associated Oil Company 



Sharon Bldg. 



San Francisco 



"BEAUTY SALON"— 
THE POWDER PUFF- 






Now under New 


Management 


Hair restored lo its natural color. 
Hair Dyeing and Bleaching. 




Katherine McNamara — fy 


arcel 


Waver 


Inez Dere, formerly of the City of Paris 

212 Stockton St. Suite 305 

Phone Douglas 6219 



PROF. JOHN A. JACKSON 

Instructor of Swimming 

TERMS 

Full Course $10.00 

Single Lesson $1.00. Six Lessons $5.00 

Lurline Baths, Bush & Larlfin Sts. 

Phone Franklin 608 



For that stubborn cough 
Use Old Snake Doctor's Cough Remedy 

SNAKE DRUG CO. 

Formerly G. Leipnitz fit Co. 

Now Located at 

127-129 KEARNY ST. 



California Advertiser for July 2, 1921 



15 



Automobilitis 

In the touring car I sit, thinking, mother 

dear, of you 

And our cozy little home so far away. 

We are standing in the road, with a tire 

that's gone and "blowed." 

And the engine's acting in a funny way. 

Cheer up, comrades, if you can. 
Crank, crank, crank, our back is breaking. 
While the batteries are gone, we will crank 
away till dawn, 

Tis the fate of almost every auto fan. 

Though we yank upon the crank, there is no 
gas in the tank. 
And the carburetor quit long, long ago. 
So we cannot get up steam, and we cannot 
hire a team, 
And it's almost time to see the morning's 
glow. 

Crank, crank, crank, our knees are shaking, 

Cheer up, comrades, just the same, 
Though the benzine buggies balk, we can all 
get out and walk 

Test Brakes Regularly 

It will require perhaps ten to fifteen min- 
utes to go out on a side street and test the 
brakes. Roughly, each brake should prove 
its ability to stop the car correctly under the 
following figures: 

Car Speed Should Stop In 

10 miles per hour 10 feel 

15 miles per hour 20 feet 

20 miles per hour 38 feet 

25 miles per hour 57 feet 

30 miles per hour 85 feet 

35 miles per hour 100 feet 

40 miles per hour 150 feet 

50 miles per hour 225 feet 

It will require two persons to make the 
lest satisfactorily, one to drive and apply 
the brakes, the other to watch the speedo- 
meter and give the signals when to apply 
brakes and note where the car is brought to 
a complete stop. A well-defined chalk mark 
on the pavement should be made lor the 
starting place. The driver will approach 
this at a predetermined speed, say. twenty 
miles per hour, the usual driving speed. Just 
as the car reaches the mark the observe! 
drops his hand as a signal to the driver, and 
the latter immediately declutches and ap- 
plies the brake. The distance the car travels 
is, of course, easily measured. 

Flooding of Carbureter 

Flooding of the carbureter is caused by 
several possible troubles. A needle »alve 
may be held open or be leaking. Dirt may 
have collected on the seat of the valve, pre- 
\enling its closing, or the following may be 
the causes: Imperfect or worn needle valve 
or seat; mechanism stuck: a too heav) or 
leaking float, which would sink too deep, 
holding the needle valve open: level too 
high; loose spray nozzle. 



DR. A. E. ROBERT, D. D. C. P. 

"HF.Al.int — PRACTITIONER" 

Class in Zone Therapy opened June 1st, 
whirl enables you to he your own and 
family physician ever after. Bring your 
sick. Phone eve., ti p. m. for appointment. 
Oak. 4880. 

M42 Isabella St., Sim PublO cur to 2-ltii si. 
Oakland, < nl. 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

INSURANCE BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

Gus' Fashion 

The MOST POPULAR RESTAURANT 

65 Post Street, Near Market Street. 
Phone Kearny 4536 San Francisco, Calif. 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 
French and Italian Dinners. 

FISH AND CAME A SPECIALTY 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Sts. 
Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without 

dining in the finest cafe in America 
Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner $1.75 



An Ounce of Prevention is 
Worth Many Pounds of 
Ten - mile - from - no- 
where - regret. 

Let our expert automobile electricians 
inspect your starting, lighting and 
ignition systems regularly. It's the best 
insurance against a breakdown at an 
important moment. 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 

M/ISTFR AUTOMOULE eLECTRICIANS 
955 Po.t Street SAN FRANCISCO 



Or Both — "What relation does a 
beat to mankind?" "Either a son 
daughter." — Tale Record. 



stork 



V . Stand fur tin- !"-i in BnaineM Training 


£8I\ 


Munson fPYSJ School 

1 


..for.. 


Private Secretaries 


600 SUTTER ST. FRANKLIN 306 





An interesting visitor at the polo game 

Sunday at the San Mateo Polo Club was 
Miss Ruth Chatterton, who was the guest 
of Mr. Richard M. Tobin. The charming 
young actress made a number of friends 
here when she came with Henry Miller last 
year, and during her recent three weeks' 
slay has been constantly entertained. Mr. 
Tobin gave a luncheon at the polo club for 
Miss Chatterton before the game, and had 
as other guests Mr. and Mrs. William Par- 
rott. Captain Edward McCauley, U. S. N„ 
Mrs. McCauley. Mr. and Mrs. Cyril Tobin, 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Tobin and Miss 
Lillian Hopkins. 

Guests at a bridge tea at the home of 

Mrs. William Palmer Fuller had a delightful 
surprise Tuesday. Following an afternoon 
at the card tables, it was discovered that 
the roses on the tables had small announce- 
ment cards hidden in their centers. The 
cards contained the announcement of the 
engagement of Miss Marie Kinkelin and Al- 
fred Otto, both graduates of this month's 
class at the University of California. 

On the S. S. Olympic, sailing from 

New York for Cherbourg on Saturday, June 
25, were Miss Mary Julia Crocker, her 
brother Harry Crocker, Miss Suzanne L'En- 
clos. Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Childs III of 
New York (Laura Mabon), Osgood Hooker 
and his son, Osgood Hooker. Mrs. Osgood 
Hooker and Miss Aileen Mcintosh, who 
have been abroad all spring, will join the 
party upon their arrival in Europe. 

Mrs. John McGaw is recuperating from 

a recent operation for appendicitis, and is 
confined to her room at Adlers. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. Deering and 

I rancesca Deering will leave in the fall 
for Europe to be away a year or so. Miss 
Deering will enter school, probably in Flor- 
ence. Italy. She has a pronounced gift for 
languages and music, and for this reason 
will probably prefer to complete her educa- 
tion in Italy. 

For the present the Deering family looks 
forward to passing the midsummer in Santa 
Barbara. They will go to the new hotel, the 
Samarkand. 



Wisps of Wisdom 

The man who does you an injury will re- 
member it long after you have forgiven him. 

Remember when you are right you can af- 
ford to keep your temper. When you are 
wrong you can't afford to lose it. 

An optimist can always see the bright side 
of the other fellow's misfortune. 

The best education in the world is that 
got by struggling to make a living. 

Don't think you are a failure because you 
are not piling up wealth. If you are honest, 
industrious, square; if you are cheerful un- 
der difficulties, helpful and inspiring to 
everybody about you: if you are I 
every opportunity to improve yoursel* 
r.re infinitely more successful than a greedy, 
hard, selfish millic 



16 



San Francisco News Letter and 




PLEASURE/. 



"Obey no wand but pleasure's — Tom Moore. 




Tiny Trixie Tickles Orpheumites 
"Up from the very first beginnings, 

Out to the everlasting ends. 
There's nothing worth the wear of winning 

■j ! I u /'iter and the love of friends." 

Trixie Friganza should have that verse set 
to music and sing it to her clamoring audi- 
ence at the end of her entertainment when 
we were all too weak from laughter to do 
anything but flap our hands and hope she 
will do something quieting. What an en- 
dearing quality is the mirth-making one! 
What affectionate memories we take away 
with us from the Orpheum of the large 
laughing lady and her tuneful tales! 

For a sleep-disturber, however, there's the 
daring and dangerous act of Miss Dora, "the 
girl in the golden globe," who races around 
the inside of the structure on a motor cycle 
until the hair of the audience stands on 
end. 

Kitner and Reany in a funny act called 
"An Ocean Episode," produced many 
laughs. 

"Bubbles" is a musical and dancical 
picture, very .pretty and melodious, giving 
Jack Norton, Queenie Smith, Marjone 
Leach, Susie Hobbs and Frank Farrington 
a chance to do a little bit of everything with 
voices and feet. 

"A Six Cylinder Comedy," with Billy 
Miller rather missed fire with one member 
of the audience, but the others appeared to 
enjoy it. 

Mae Melville and George Rule were up- 
to-date and funny in "The League of 
Servants." 

Well, a pleasant evening was had by all, 
and we walked out to the tune of "When 
It's Moonlight in California." executed by 
Raymond Bone, and awaited in the lobby 
to sec the Afghanistan Princess, her three 
sons and suite, who sat in a box and beamed 
on the show. The Royal Lady managed to 
laugh in spite of the diamond screwed in her 
nose. 



Erway, another dependable favorite, again 
delighted his audience. It is good to know 
that Mr. Erway is a faithful San Franciscan, 
or Broadway would surely swallow him up. 



Alcazar's Gentle Brute 

It was hard to believe — the startling news 
that Dudley Ayres had become a brute, "The 
Brute," in fact. And just to show what a 
really good actor he is, the popular Alcazar 
lead has made a Perfect Brute. The play 
is interesting but highly improbable, and 
while the parts afford opportunity to Alcazar 
players to display their various talents, one 
has the feeling that they all might be better 
employed. Una Trevelyn was well cast and 
gave an agreeable performance as the mis- 
taken wife. Anna MacNaughton never 
misses a chance to score in a character part 
and she made a hit as "Mrs. Pope." Ben 



California 

May McAvoy's second picture. "A Private 
Scandal," is the better of her two attempts, 
though the plot is not exactly inspiring. 
She is dainty and shows great possibilities 
as a future star of greater magnitude. 
Buster Keaton runs the feature a close sec- 
ond in entertaining qualities. 

A very elaborate extra has been prepared 
by the management to show the natives 
what Bridging the Bay would be like, and 
this one part of the show is worth the 
whole admittance. Heller provides appro- 
priate music for this and also appears later 
in several fine selections. 



Imperial 

This week's feature, "Snow Blind." is a 
good bit of realistic photography with a well- 
chosen cast. While the plot is somewhat 
imaginary, even for the type, there is proper 
sequence and plenty of gripping interest. 

Al St. John tries desperately to liven up 
ihings and seems to amuse a large portion 
of the audience. Seven's usual mixture of 
o.nera and jazz and the screen news com- 
plete the program. Next week we are of- 
fered one of Peter B. Kyne's stories, "The 
Ten Dollar Raise." 



Orpheum's Next Offerings 

"A Trip to Hitland," next week brings to 
the Orpheum ten of the country's most pop- 
ular song composers. 

Curiosity alone causes most persons to 
want to see these song writers, but they are 
not bidding for approval as curios. They 
do an act, an unusual but exceedingly enter- 
taining one: the srme talents they availed 
themselves upon when writing songs, they 



SAM f RAHC1SCO 



TKE OtST W m NfWO%>t\U.fc 



\ 



^ "Sv pWtnCWu&t. ..* 




MA HS EES 25 and 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 

Except Sats., Suns, and Holidays 

AND THE SAME GREAT SHOWS 



Smoking permitted in dress circle and 
loges. 



are devoting now to entertainment of their 
audiences. 

One of the cleverest comedy players in 
vaudeville, Wilfred Clarke, with Grace Menk- 
en ?nd Company will offer a farce comedy, 
"Now What." Clarke, himself, wrote it and 
injected that particular style of hilarity for 
which he and all his productions are noted. 
Vaudeville fans know his acts invariably to 
be torrents of fun. 

Former star of "Canary Cottage," when 
that production played long engagements in 
California, Carl McCullough, one of the 
cleverest men today on the stage, is to pre- 
sent his diversion entitled "Squirrel Haven." 
Tom Elliott will assist. Boundless personal- 
ity of pleasing style is possessed by well 
liked McCullough. 

Two jewels in a new setting, Clara Barry 
supported by Orville Whitledge, will offer 
their assemblage of clever songs and bright 
patter. 

Important factors in the world of make- 
believe are Emma Francis and Harold Ken- 
nedy who have original laughs, songs and 
dances. Their style of offerings is summery, 
flirtations and somewhat oriental. 

Max York's school has six little dogs for 
pupils, whose efforts to learn are ripe with 
ludicrous antics. The result is a lot of fun 
and laughter which give children extatic 
pleasure and the grown-ups much hilarity. 

A form of gymnastic entertainment pres- 
ented in the setting of a drawing room will 
be the contribution The Recktors will furn- 
ish. 

"Bubbles." with its cast of Jack Norton. 
Queenie Smith, Frank Farrington, Marjoric 
Leach which scores interestingly this week, is 
to continue. 



California State Fair 

With the time fast approaching for the 
1921 California State Fair to be held at Sac- 
ramento September 3 to I I inclusive, Secre- 
tary Chas. W. Paine of the State Agricultur- 
al Society has announced that, not only will 
the exhibits this year be larger and more 
comprehensive, but the entertainment feat- 
ures will surpass any in the history of the in- 
stitution. The exhibits of cattle, swine, poul- 
try and all kinds of livestock will be much 
larger this year. The exhibits of farmhiR 
machinery, tractors, pumps, trucks and vari- 
ous harvesting machinery will be more ex- 
tensive this year. Exhibits of products of 
the land also will be more complete and 
larger. There will not be an idle hour at 
the fair, the directors now being engaged in 
working out some novel entertainment feat- 
ures in addition to the daily race programs, 
horse shows, boxing, etc. 



California Advertiser for July 2, 1921 



Alcazar's Attractions 

Gladys George, a prominent Eastern ac- 
tress, who has achieved noteworthy success 
both on the legitimate stage and in vaude- 
ville will make her first appearance at the 
Alcazar beginning next Sunday afternoon, 
July 3rd, in "The Blindness of Virtue." She 
has been engaged for a special starring sea- 
son and the play chosen for her introduction 
to San Francisco audiences is particularly 
fitting. Miss George will be well remembered 
here as having starred with James K. Hack- 
ett and De Wolf Hopper in "The Better Ole." 
She also was seen at the Orpheum in her 
own production of "The Dream Girl," in 
which she scored a tremendous hit. She 
has had in addition a wide experience in the 
films, her latest picture being "The Easy 
Road," in which she appears as Thomas 
Meighan's leading support. She was fea- 
tured with Wanda Hawley in "The House 
that Jazz Built" recently presented at a loc- 
al theatre. She was also one of the leading 
characters with Douglas McLean in his rec- 
ent screen play "Chickens." 

"The Blindness of Virtue" deals with an 
old story in modern fashion. A clergyman 
and his wife have kept their young daughter 
in ignorance of the ways of the world and 
the pitfalls of life. She finally is enlightened 
by a young man who comes to her neigh- 
borhood to live and her experiences are 
told in novel and entertaining fashion. 

Dudley Ayres will have a delightful char- 
acterization and one which suits his person- 
ality particularly well. Ben Erway will also 
have an important role. Particularly good 
parts will fall to Charles Yule and Florence 
Printy. 



GOOD OLD DAYS RETURN 

The new prices at the Fairmont Hotel are 
suggestive of the good old days when San 
Francisco was world-famous for the excel- 
lence of the food which was to be had in 
restaurants and hotels and the reasonable 
prices were more then. Will those fine old 
days ever come again? It looks as if they 
are already here with the Fairmont Hotel 
furnishing breakfast from fifty cents to one 
dollar, luncheon eighty-five cents, and dinner 
one dollar and seventy-five conls. 

The spirit of the Fairmont Hotel is to 
provide its patrons the best at the least ixis- 
sible cost. lis prices have been reduced by 
reason of excellent management and mod- 
ern methods, but its cuisine ami service are 
not capable of any change for the Fair- 
mont guarantees perfection and it has long 
been reached. In its courtesy to patrons. 
and in all that goes to make a hotel ideal, 
the Fairmont preserves its established rep- 
utation and will continue that policy. It is 
a magnificent hotel splendidly managed. 



Columbia 

One evening many years ago in a small 
southern city, a very little girl was taken by 
her father to the theater for the first time 
in her life; the play she saw was "Rip Van 
Winkle." After it was over the child's 
father presented her to the great actor who 
played "Rip," saying, "Joe, my daughter 
says it's the best play she ever saw." And 
Jefferson lifted her up in his kind arms and 
told her quite solemnly that she was a great 
critic. Well, here she is telling ycu the 
story. Frank Keenan is now playing "Rip 
Van Winkle" at the Columbia. The fine old 
play still makes it strong appeal, and 
Thomas Wilkes presents it in praiseworthy 
manner, with an excellent cast to support 
him, and the personal assistance of Thomas 
Jefferson in the matter of costuming and 
traditional points. Mr. Keenan is a strong 
and sympathetic actor. 



ROYALLY ENTERTAINED 

The bankers visiting San Francisco dur- 
ing the National Association of Credit Men's 
Convention were royally entertained by the 
Credit Department of the First National 
Bank of San Francisco. Mr. Seed, the man- 
ager of that department, was one of the 
original directors and a charter member of 
the Robert Morris Associates. He has at- 
tended all of their conventions since the in- 
ception of the organization, and when his 
friends relumed his visits by coming to the 
San Francisco convention in large numbers. 
San Francisco's reputation for hospitality 
was maintained. 

The bank provided machines for the use 
of the visiting delegates, and when they left 
they were enthusiastic about the metropolis 
of the West. 



A VALUABLE BOOK 

"Will-Power and Work." by Jules I 
LLD. PHD., deals particularly with the de- 
velopment of the practical energy which 
makes for real success in life. The author 
devotes himself to the theory and practice 
of self culture. It is a very useful work for 
those who wish to improve their talent* by 
taking advantage of valuable information 
and suggestions. Funk & Wagnalls. New 
York, are the publishers. 



17 

OVATION TO MASCAGNI 

"The curtain fell on the first act — and 
the whole house went mad," writes Frank 
Gates, who witnessed the triumph of Mas- 
cagni's new opera "II Piccolo Marat" at the 
great Costanzi Theatre, Rome, a few 
weeks ago. 

It is thirty-one years since Mascagni was 
the centre of a similar scene in the same 
theatre, when he produced his "Cavalleria 
Rusticana" and became one of the great 
names in the musical world. 

He has been somewhat of a disappoint- 
ment since his initial success but his latest 
opera has restored him to the heights of 
popularity. It was beyond all expectation. 
The ovation to the composer was a reception 
of the night he set Rome wild by his youth- 
ful masterpiece. 

At the end of the first act the orchestra 
dropped their instruments and screamed ap- 
plause. Chorus, stage carpenters, electri- 
cians crowded round the maestro, madly ac- 
claiming him. Dazed and overcome, he re- 
ceived a magnificent wreath of flowers from 
the Fascisti, the young patriotic Italians, 
who thus welcomed him back to their midst 
after his recent passing flirtation with Bol- 
shevism. His wife, radiant, smiled amid 
tears of joy, and his baby grandchild shout- 
ed in uncomprehending delight at all the 
tumult. The prompter wriggled from his 
box, madly waving his hands. 

After the second act — even greater enthu- 
siasm! A love duet roused the audience to 
frenzy. Mascagni. dazed and fatigued, took 
call after call before the curtain. 

Not till about I :30 in the morning was the 
perloimance over. The maestro had to take 
'hirty-one calls. At last one of the company 
had to step forth and tell the audience that 
Mascagni was exhausted, that he was resting 
after his labors. An hour or so later he 
slipped out quietly, and. with chosen friends, 
supped merrily. Another "Cavalleria" tri- 
umph ' Another night like that delirious one 
of thirty years ago! Lucky Pietro Mascagni! 

"Mascagni, perhaps for his very faults, 
hs won and retains the esteem and affection 
of Italy." says Frank Oales. "His hair is 
as thick as ever, but now it is very gray. 
Between his teeth is his favorite cigar. He 
never seems to sleep. He talks on every 
subject 



POSITION V> AVI l li 

• ii.' Importance calltn 

nn, I bonds I'a: 

II. \. i lllol. »\ 
Roily oak Hotel, SaustJIto 



Spend Your Vacation 

IN THE 

Beautiful Feather River Country 

Til 

TI1R SEA IN Tilt HK IRT "I rHI 

Reached *ia 

WESTERN PACIFIC RAILROAD 

"The Feather Rirer Route" 
— Numerous Resorts alone the famous FEATHER RIVER and near the many 
lakes and streams where fish and game are abundant. 

fim t"K li l i strati n mi rims 



Tick" Oficei 50 POST STREET «nd FERRY BUILDING-T I-phone Sotter 1651 



18 



YSMy , //yyyy7/s///ss//7//y/7s/?sss/^^ 



SUNBEAMS 



Cornered — "Do you like to dance in this 
dark corner?" "No, let's stop dancing." — 
Columbia Jester. 



Especially ; n Winter — This is a har-rd 
world." said Pat as he knocked off work for 
the day. "Yis," said Mike. "Oi do be think- 
in' that ivery toime I put me pickaxe into 
it." — Boston Transcript. 



Breaking the Solid Drouth — The Drunk: 
Good ol" private stock from muh l'il ol' cel- 
lar. Whoopee! Home, James. 

The Chauffeur: That wasn't your private 
stock, sir. 1 saw you buy it from a boot- 
legger. You've forgotten, sir. 

The Drunk: Aw right. Hospital, James! 

The Chauffeur And it was a strange boot- 
legger — one you didn't know. 

The Drunk: Morgue, James, morgue! — 
Barrie Payne, in Nashville Tennessean. 



An Irrelevant Detail — The Judge (to pris- 
oner) : When were you born? (No reply.) 
Did you hear what I asked? When is your 
birthday? 

Prisoner (sullenly) : Wot do you care? 
You ain't going to give me nothing. — Klods- 
Hans (Copenhagen). 



Oh! — "Norah," said Mrs. Dedbeat, from 
the top of the stairs, "tell that man who is 
ringing the doorbell that I am not receiving 
today ! " 

The servant girl went to the door and said 
something to the man ; then she stepped in- 
to the hall and called upstairs: 

"I told him you were not receivin' today, 
mam! But he says he ain't deliverin', he's 
collectin' ! " — Cincinnati Enquirer. 



Like the Irish Problem — The Vicar: I 
suppose ou've a large family to support, 
Mrs. Dempsey? 

Mrs. Dempsey: I have, sir; and if they 
didn't all earn their own living I couldn't 
manage it." — Pearson's Weekly (London.) 



Reminders — Farmer Turmut had been to 
market. His cattle had fetched good prices, 
and, feeling flush, he bought a piece of cloth 
to have made into a suit of clothes. But. 
alas! on his homeward journey he lost it. 
His carelessness annoyed Mrs. Turmut very 
much. She told the vicar about it next day. 
A week later the vicar met Turmut. "Good 
morning, Mr. Turmut," said the good man ; 
"have you heard anything about your 
cloth?" "Yes," he said, mournfully and 
solemnly, "I have — morning, noon and 
night." 



"I dress to match my complexion." "But 
hand-painted gowns are very expensive, are- 
n't they?" 



Loquacious — She: "1 am collecting, you 
know, for the suffering poor." 

He: "But are you quite sure they are suf- 
fering?" 

She: "Oh, yes. Why, I go to their homes 
and talk to them for hours." 



Steady — Coming along a slippery pave- 
ment one evening after he had been looking 
on the whisky when it was amber, Pat lost 
his balance and toppled over — right in front 
of the parish priest. 

"Ah. Pat," said the priest, thinking the 
opportunity a good one for driving home a 
moral, "sinners stand on slippery ground." 

"So Oi see," retorted Pat; "but, begorra, 
it's more than Oi can do." 



On a Busy Street — Pedestrian (to traffic 
cop) : Officer, what is the quickest way to 
the hospital? 

Cop: Well, you cross here and you'll be 
there in fifteen minutes. — De Notenkraker 
(Amsterdam.) 



Profe 



-Na 



five ; 



animals living in 



the 



Polar regions. 

Studen — A walrus. 

Professor — Correct. 

Student — A seal. 

Professor — Correct. 

Student — And three Polar bears. 



PYRO-VOID 

Dr. Hoagland's Home Treatment 
- for - 

PYORRHEA 

Package with full directions sent 
in plain wrapper for One Dollar 

Satisfaction Guaranteed or Money Refunded 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

Dental Specialist 

908 Market treet, at Powell 



an Fr 



■ancisco 



Dept. N. L. Established 1903 

SAVE YOUR TEETH 



Are you troubled with falling hair, itching scalp 
and dandruff? 

We have a message for you. 
Send for Booklet. 

EDWARD RAYMOND CO.. 
18 Broadway, Williamson, West Va. 



r 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

1174 Phelan Building, San Francisco 

Has a practical system of placing manuscripts for 
publication, which is important to people who write. 
Franlc criticism and competent revision are also 
available. 



REWARD COMES LATE 

By Claude Weimer 
They showered the thorns on his head 

When he lived this side 
Of the grave, and they covered his bed 

With flowers when he died. 

They disputed with him when to live 

In peace he had come, 
And they prayed for him to forgive 

When his lips were dumb. 

They gave no thoughts to his needs 

When hard was his lot. 
And they praised him with words, and deeds 

When he needed it not. 

They lendered no thanks in his day 

For the gifts that he gave. 
And they claimed him a friend when he lay 

Alone in the grave. 

They are friends of the dead — the dead only; 

They came not to him 
When, sick unto dying and lonely. 

He waited for them. 

They showered the thorns on his head 

When he lived this side 
0( the grave, and they covered his bed 

With flowers when he died. 



CARMEL-BY-THE SEA 

By Henrietta C. Penny 
Green glittering billows, wreathed with snowy 
foam 
Dashing and breaking on the shining sand; 
Bold points with stern gray rocks on 
either hand. 
Deep limpid pools where starfish find a 
home; 
Cliffs crowned with flowers of many a 

gorgeous hue 
Stone-crop and poppy and the lupine blue; 
Snow-white sanddunes that grudgingly 

give room 
To sea-verbenas' pink and yellow bloom; 
And back of all the fragrant breath of 
Pines 
Sighing and whispering to the sounding 

sea. 
With fluttering bird, and butterfly and bee. 
Where morning-glory o'er the wild rose 

twines; 
This is the picture, that remains with me. 
Of thy rare charms, oh! Carmel-by-the-Sea. 



THE MAGIC OF THE DUNES 

By Burton Jackson Wyman 
By day, the dunes of shifting sands. 
Sun-seared and by the sea-wind whipped. 

In desolation rise — 
By night, beneath the mellow moon. 
While lovers kiss and whisper low. 

They bloom, a Paradise. 



J 



"THE SAMOAN GIRL 

This novel by Frederick Moore is a story 
of the China seas and full of odd dramatic 
thrills. 



DIVIDEND NOTICES 



ANGLO-CALIFORNIA TRUST COMPANY 

(Savings Department) — Main Bank, 
Market and Sansome streets; branches, 
101 Market street. Sixteenth and Mis- 
sion streets, Fillmore and Geary streets. 
Third and Twentieth streets. For the 
half-year ending June 30, 1921, divi- 
dend has been declared at the rate of 
four (4) per cent per annum on all de- 
posits, payable on and after Friday. 
July I, 1921. Dividends not called for 
are added to and bear the same rate of 
interest as the principal from July 1 , 
1921 . Deposits made on or before July 
11, 1 92 1 , will earn interest from July 1 , 

1921. 

LOUIS SUTTER, 

Vice-President and Cashier. 



A Jubilant Jubilee — "Some years ago." 
says an American who used to live in Lon- 
don, "before Queen Victoria's death and 
about the time the Queen's jubilee was to be 
celebrated, there was overheard this conver- 
sation between two old Scotchwomen on a 
street corner: 

" 'Can ye tell, me. wumman, what is it 
they call a jubilee?' 

" 'Weel, it's this,' said the other. 'When 
folk has been married twenty-five years, 
that's a silver wuddin'; and when they have 
been married fifty years, that's a golden 
wuddin'. But if the mon's dead then it's a 
jubilee.' " — Philadelphia Public Ledger. 



FIRST FEDERAL TRUST COMPANY, cor. 

Montgomery and Post Sts. — For the 
half year ending June 30, 1921, a divi- 
dend has been declared at the rate of 
four (4) per cent per annum on all 
savings deposits, payable on and after 
July 1, 1921; dividends not called for 
are added to the deposit account and 
earn dividends from July 1, 1921; de- 
posits made on or before July II, 1921. 
will earn interest from July I, 1921. 
JAMES K. MOFFITT, Cashier. 



HUMBOLDT SAVINGS BANK, 783 Market 

St., near Fourth. — For the half year 
ending June 30, 1921, a dividend has 
been declared at the rate of four (4) 
per cent per annum on all savings de- 
posits, payable on and after July I. 
1921 ; dividends not called for are add- 
ed to and bear the same rate of inter- 
est as the principal from July I, 1921 ; 
deposits made on or before July I I . 
1921. will earn interest from July I. 
1921. 

H. C. KLEVESAHL. Cashier. 



SECURITY BANK AND TRUST CO.. 316 

Montgomery street. For the half-year 
ending June 30, 1921, a dividend has 
been declared at the rate of four (4) 
per cent per annum on savings deposits, 
payable on and after July I, 1921. 
Dividends not called for are added to 
and bear the same rate of interest as the 
principal from July I. 1921. Deposits 
made on or before July II. 1921. will 
earn interest 'rom July I. 1921. 
EDWARD. D. OAKLEY. Secretary. 



Very Capable — A sea captain, holding a 
glass of lime-juice approvingly up to the 
light, said: "Navies are different today from 
what they used to be. A man was talking 
to an old sailor. The sailor said: 'Yes, sir, 
my boss was in the navy, too.' 'In the navy, 
was he?' said the man. 'What was his offi- 
cial capacity, may I ask?' 'Four to five 
quarts, sir,' said the old sailor." — Washing- 
ton Star. 



DIVIDEND NOTICES 



THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SO- 
CIETY, cor. Market, McAllister and 
Jones Sts. — For the half year ending 
June 30, 1921, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of four (4) per cent 
per annum on all deposits, payable on 
and after Friday, July I, 1921; divi- 
dends not drawn will be added to de- 
positors' accounts, becoming a part 
thereof, and will earn dividends from 
July I, 1921 ; deposits made on or be- 
fore July 1, 1921, will draw interest 
from July I, 1921. 

R. M. TOBIN, Secretary. 



Spoiling for Fun — "How is the traffic 
system in this town?" 

"Like the traffic system of every other 
town." 

"Well?" 

"A constant irritation to motorists who 
want to monopolue the streets and lose their 
tempers every time a large, imperturbable 
trolley car gets in their way." — Birmingham 
Age-Herald. 



Talkative Barber (after wearying man in 
the chair for half an hour) — And what would 
you like on your head, sir? 

Customer — My hat — just as soon as you 
can manage it! 



The New Recipe — Lady — You say your 
father was injured in an explosion? How did 
it ha 



ppen . 



Child — Well, mother says it was too much 
yeast, but father says it was too little sugar. 
— Kasper (Stockholm.) 



ITALIAN-AMERICAN BANK, southeast cor. 
Montgomery arid Sacramento Sts. ; 
North Beach branch, cor. Columbus av. 
and Broadway — For the half year end- 
ing June 30, 1921, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of four (4) per 
cent per annum on all savings deposits 
payable on and after July I, 1921 ; di- 
vidends not called for will be added to 
the principal and bear the same rate of 
interest from July I, 1921; deposits 
made on or before July II, 1921, will 
earn interest from July I, 1921. 

A. SBARBORO, President. 



BANK OF ITALY, junction Market, Powell 
and Eddy sts.; Montgomery st. branch 
souther.st corner Montgomery and Clay 
sts.; Market st. branch, junction Mar- 
ket, Mason and Turk sts. — For the half 
year ending June 30, 1921. a dividend 
has been declared at the rate of four 
(4) per cent per annum on all savings 
deposits, payable on and after Friday, 
July I. 1921 ; dividends not called for 
are added to and bear the same rate of 
interest as the principal from July I. 
1921 ; deposits made on or before July 
II. 1921. will earn interest from July I. 
1921. 

A. P. GIANNINI. President. 



UNION TRUST COMPANY OF SAN FRAN- 
CISCO, Market street and Grant avenue 
— For the half year ending June 30. 
1921, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of four (4) per cent per an- 
num on all savings deposits, payable on 
and after Friday, July I. 1921. Divi- 
dends not called for are added to and 
bear the same rate of interest as the 
principal from July I. 1921. Money 
deposited on or 'before July II. 1921, 
will earn interest from July I . I q 2 I 
F. J. BRICKWEDEL. Cashier. 



Juto 
Camp 
Comfort 
Outfit 




THF. 

OITF1T 
111 II M 

structed. . 

Jlsx THINK— A ."ha,r 1 
lapsible A Met on h. furnished in ar 

rroni 



.icanrfaciurejty THREE LEAF COT MANUFACTURING CO. .■ r-pyvale, California 



Gentlewomen — 

Jl trade that is of 

great importance: 

THE CARE OF THE HAIR 
THE CARE OF THE FACE 
THE CARE OF THE NAILS 

Hairdressing 
<JXCarceling 



Cc 



Hair St 



ore 



.os groves Mair 

Established 25 years 

360 Geary Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone: KEARNY 3842 

{Berkeley Store: 233 1 Telegraph Ave. 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of Pro- 
prietors 



Aggregate Assets, 30th 
Sept. 1920 




$24,655,500.00 
16,750,000.00 

24,655,500.00 



$362,338,975.00 



SIR JOHN RUSSELL FRENCH, K. B. E., General Manager 

357 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian States, New Zealand, Fiji, Papua (New 
Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of Australasian Banking 
Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged. 

London Office: 
29 THREADNEEDLE STREET. E. C. 2 
Agents : 
Bank of California, National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bank, Crocker Nat'l Bank 



Head Office: 
GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 California St., San Francico, Cal. 
Member of the Federal Reserve System 
Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement and 7th Avenue 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

DECEMBER 51, 1920 

Assets $69,878,147.01 Capital Actually Paid Up $1,000,000.00 

Deposits 66,338,147.01 Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,540.000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund. _ $343,536.85 

OFFICERS 

IOHN A. BUCK, President 

GEO. TOURNY, Vice-Pres. and Manager A. H. R. SCHMIDT. Vice-Pres. and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSE, Vice-President A. H. MULLER, Secretary 

\VM. D. NEWHOUSE. Assistant Secretary 

WILLIAM HERRMANN. Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL. Assistant Cashier 

G A. BELCHER. Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN. Assistant Cashier 

C. W. HEYER, Manager Mission Branch W. C. HEYER. Manager Park-Presidio Dist. Branch 

O. F. PAULSEN. Manager Haight Street Branch 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

JOHN A. BUCK E. T. KRUSE I. N. WALTER A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY A. H. R. SCHMIDT HUGH GOODFELLOW E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. A. CHRISTENSON ROBERT DOLLAR L. S. SHERMAN 

GOODFELLOW, EELLS, MOORE & ORRICK, General Attorneys 



Normandie Garage 

Gough and Sutter Sts. 



Washing and Polishing Day and Night. 

Cars Oiled and Greased. 

Crank Cases Drained Free. 

Home Garage Trade Solicited. 



Fillmore 4815 



ALEMITE 

Is the ACME of lubrication. 

Our lubrication service station 
possesses the same quality. 

624 Van Neaa Aye. San Francisco 



BOND DEPARTMENT 

THE ANGLO AND LONDON PARIS 

NA1IONAL BANK 



Su ler and Sansome Slreels 
Phone Ke -, ""V !>^o0 
San Francisco, Cal f. 



RECOMMENDS 

IRRIGATION DISTRICT BONDS 

FOR INVESTMENT 

THEY ARE more secure than first mortgages because they rank ahead o( 
first morgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT. 

Yield from 6% to 634 % 

Let us send you our booklet THE IRRIGATION DISTRICT BOND 



THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO. CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 

STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and at LONDON. ENG; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE, 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE. Manager W. J. COULTHARD. Assistant Manager 



Established July 20 1856 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



SATURDAY, JULY 9, 1921 



AND 

(California Ahoprttspr 

$5.00 PER YEAR 



First Federal Trust Company 

SAVINGS — COMMERCIA1 T1I1ST 

1'okI mill Montgomery Streets 

Combined Statement of Condition, June 30, 1921 



RESOl HIES 

First Mortgage Loans on Real Estate $7,708,028.73 

Other Loans and Discounts 3,491,098.47 

State. County. Municipal and School District 

Bonds 1.726.358.86 

Corporation Ronds 3,257,708 99 

Real Estate 17,683.63 

i ither Resources I2.2i;.5.2. r i 

United Slates Ilonds 1.831,364 38 

United states Certificates of Indebtedness 3.006.500.00 

Cash and Due from Ranks 3.343,014.18 



LIABILITIES 

Capital - - $1. 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 

I deposits 22, 

< ther Liabilities - 

Dividends Unpa id 



500, .mii 

744,949.41 
fl2S.12S.4ll 

75.844.38. 

45.000.00 



TOTAL $24,393,922 1 9 



TOTAL t24.393.922.19 



RUDOLPH 3PRECKELS 
CLINTON E. WORDEN 
.1. (I. HOOPER 
o. K. CUSHING 
J, K. MOFFITT 



Vice-1 "resid 



OFFICERS 

President C. H. 

Vice-President R. R. 

and Trust Offici t M. It. 

Vice-President L A 

Cashier and Seci etary S. W. 



McCI IRMICK 
PARDOW 
■ -i .\ i: K 
McCRI STLE 
DRASCOVICH 



Treasurer 

Assistant Secretary 

Assistant Cashier 

Assistant Trust I Ifftcer 

Assistant Secretary 



lllltKf I'lllt- 



WYATT H, ALLEN 
H il IN F. BROI IKE 
O. K. CUSHING 
.1. (1. HOOPER 



II li 'MAS .1 ENNINGS 
CLIFTON H. Kkul.l. 
WALTER s. MARTIN 
u. d. Mcelroy 



■ I K. MilFFITT 

.1 Wll'.S D. I 'H ELAN 

\V. T. SMITH 

KI'l'i 'I.™ SPRECKELS 



ROLLA V. WATT 
GEORGE WHITTELL 
CLINTON E. WORDEN 



siivhiKM Deposits made i»n or before Jul] 



iilll rani intrri'Nt from .lul> I. 




.lull 
fruit 



,',.rc av ThC SIM 

epSt s lts uiilde iin ur lul'iirc 
1. 11*21, will earn interest 
.lull I. I II- 1 



isiui ESTABLISHED OVER HALF I I EMI 111 lliv.1 

104TH SEMI-ANNUAL STATEMENT 

Humboldt Savings Bank 



» l\ IM.*. 
INTEREST 



783 Market * 

-I IMMIIUI I VI 



tri-,-1. Near Fourth Street 
-Till ST — SAKE DEPOSIT 



Itll.Tn 



PAID OH *A\ IM.| 

.n m: 



RBSOI m i :s 
Leans on Real Ksi.-e 

■ n Stocks and Bonds 1.11" 

Other Loans, includinir loans to 

municipal ties 1.473.488.88 

United States Liberty Bonds— '■•'• i" 

Municipal Bonds 
Public Utilities and other Bonds 2.2!': 

Bank Premlsi - I 

ether Real Estate 7.944.01 

leposil Vaults 
Cash en hand and in Banks 1.. • 



DEPOSITS, 4"-.. PER A\\l »l 

:!<>. ili2 1 

1.1 ABILITIES 

Capital Paid in Coin 

e Fund 

Undivided Profits 
I 'u.. 1 1. positors 



11.200.1 

150.000.00 

-4S:i 
17.626,768.01 



U.EXANT'EK 1' KEYES 
\\M, H. CROCKER 

u A ICE TRICK 



J1S.JS 

OFFII Kll> 

Pi ssfdent V. M 

Vici -President B. H 

Vice-Presidenl .1. \. speaks 






SMITH 
Mi N P'>l: 



KEYES & ERSKINE 






H C KLEVESAHL ■-• • retary and Cashier 

PACE A. PELCEC.EP. Assistant Vice-Pres. 

nillKI TORS 
\\ h Crocker, Prw Natl. Rank William i ■ En.it 

« A Frederick. Capitalist 

Rudolph Harold. Jr.. : R D. Rontons Jr. Hanker 

nder i> K.v.s. President John 

P. Zinnrrman 




RESPONSIBILITY 

From the quarry where the 
rough granite is hewn, 
through the- processes of 
drilling, cutting, sawing, 
carVing, and polishing, to 
the final assembly and fab- 
rication into the Memorial, 
one organization demon- 
strates by consistent success 
the value of this single re- 
sponsibility for design, man- 
ufacture, and installation. 

One standard, therefore, 
governs the design and man- 
ufacture of the materials as 
well as the engineering and 
construction service. 

Booklet "DN" on Memo- 
rials, sent on request. 



Raymond Granite Company, Inc. 



CONTRACTORS 
GRANITE— STONE— BUILDING- 

3 Potrero Avenue, San Francisco. 



-MEMORIAL 

1350 Palmetto Street, Lo: 



An gel e 




J. B. CROWE 

3652 GEARY, at 1st Ave. 10S5 Post St., at Polk 

PHONE FRANKLIN 7445 



AUTOMOBILE 
BUILDING 



Glass of All Kinds 



GLAZING 
BEVELING 



»<8xSKSxSKS*S«SKSxeK8xS><8>3*S><exSK8>3KS^^ 



§>att jffrattriBrn (Hfrnmtrlg 



Leading Newspaper of the Pacific Coast 



A Newspaper made every day 

TO SPEAK TO 

Every member of every family 

Order at once the Daily and Sunday hronic le, delivered for $1.15 a 

month —including Sunday editions. 
Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postmaster. 



Juto 
Camp 
Comfort 
Outfit 




Makes Camping a Pleasure — Picnic-ini; a Dream — Tin- Overland Trip an [deal Outing 1 . 

Practical, Strong mill Compart — The Lightest outfit on the marUi-t — specially con- 
structed, reinforced, non-sagging double bed for two people, weighs only U7 pounds. 

.11 st THINK — A Chair. Table. Settee and Cot, all in one. combined with a col- 
lapsible Auto Tent, which can be furnished in any desired combinati< n to accommodate 
from one to six people. 



Mia> 



-f-cturedby TH R£E LEAF COT MANUFACTURING CO., Sunnyvale, California 



PYR0-V01D 

Dr. Hoagland's Home Treatment 
- for - 

PYORRHEA 

Package with full directions sent 
in plain wrapper for One Dollar 

Satisfaction Guaranteed or Money Refunded 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

Dental Specialist 

90S Market treet, at Powell 

an Francisco 

Dept. N. L. Established 1903 

SAVE YOUR TEETH 



An Ounce of Prevention is 
Worth Many Pounds of 
Ten - mile - from - no- 
where- regret. 

Let our expert automobile electricians 
inspect your starting, lighting and 
ignition systems regularly. It's the best 
insurance against a breakdown at an 
important moment. 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 

SUASTER ^AUTOMOBILE ELECTRICIANS 
955 Post Street SAN FRANCISCO 



USE 

Associated Products 

"More Miles to the Gallon" 



% 

Associated Oil Company 



Sharon Bldg. 



San Francisco 



We Stand for the Best in Business Training 

Munson fr|SJ School 

..for.. 

Private Secretaries 

600 SUTTER ST. FRANKLIN 306 

Send for Cntnlng 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856. 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. XCIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., Saturday, July 9, 1921 



No. 28 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA 
ADVERTISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. 
Frederick Marriott. 259 Minna Street, near Fourth, San Francisco, Cal. Tele- 
phone Kearny 720. Entered at San Francisco, Cal.. Post Office as second 
class mail matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill. E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year, $5.00. Foreign: One 
year $6.00; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Leller does not solicit fiction and rvill not be 
responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 



Jospeh J. Tynan makes prediction of big industrial revival. 

Can't come too soon, Mr. Tynan. 

* * * 

San Francisco underbuilt, declares the Chronicle. True. But 

Los Angeles is not. Open Shop explains it. 

Now Los Angeles claims to have a lad who defeated the Polish 

chess prodigy, Sammy Rzeshewski. What next? 
¥ If. 9 

The gallant little Frenchman lost the boxing match, but he won 

the favor of Americans. Vive la France! 

San Franciscans hardly realize the importance to them of the 

concentration of a great American fleet in the Pacific. 

* * * 

In spite of our unprogressive and wasteful government, San 

Francisco is destined to be the New York of the Pacific. 

* * * 

Thirty years hence we shall be in slill worse condition, unless 

we come to our senses and establish the Open Shop. 

Los Angeles has had the free American Plan of industry for 30 

years, while San Francisco enterprise has been strangled by the 

Closed Shop. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

Under the Closed Shop the only trade really open to an Ameri- 
can boy. is that of carrying a musket in the army or swabbing decks 

in the navy. 

» * * 

In the Middle Ages, combinations of the trade unions and pro- 
fiteers' "Guilds" almost destroyed industrial Europe. History is al- 
ways repeating itself. 

* * * 

The bootlegger with $50,000 worth of illicit booze could not 

have expected belter luck. A dollar a drink and $20 per bottle' 
No wonder Excinos grabbed him. 

¥ * * 

Prohibition Superintendent Excinos intends to sweep all the 

bootleggers into the net. but for every sardine he catches, a hundred 
sharks will break through. 

» » » 

A maniac slew two San Francisco women last week. The an- 
nual murder record is keeping up well. It ought easily reach 15.000 
in the United States this year. 



Perhaps there will be some time for the small affairs of the na- 
tion — tariff, tax reduction, the building crisis, now that the Dempsey- 
Carpentier boxing bout is over? 

Of course we couldn't think of our disabled veterans while the 

Dempsey-Carpentier scheme was on, but how about the crippled 
boys now? Once they were "heroes." 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

"Homes must be held sacred" declares Federal Judge Dooling, 

and all the delighted homebrewers perk up and tackle their anti- 
Volstead apparatus with renewed energy. 

f * * 

The Hearst morning daily is whooping up Marina Park. "Which 

we struggled so long to get" chimes in Annie Laurie. How much 
more is this going to cost the luckless taxpayers? 

* * * 

The Chronicle is a better and liver newspaper than ever, and 

that is saying something. You can always tell by the columns of 
our leading daily when M. H. de Young is personally on the job. 
* ♦ » 

Sultana Fatima, the Afghan princess, has told San Francisco 

she is a "progressive" because she wants veils abolished. If she had 
said "Skirts and all thereunto belonging" she might impress our Far 
Western progressives. 

* * * 

It is not so much the wages that employers in San Francisco 

complain of. as the fact that the man paying for the work has no- 
thing to say in the management of his concern. The business agent 

is the real boss. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

An Oakland widower. 74. three times bereaved, and an exeprt- 

enced widow of 65 have been wedded. "Love at first sight." both 

declare. Is this a case of interstitial glands, or just plain ordinary 

brain softening? 

» » * 

When will the Drys reconcile themselves to the well-established 

fact that the tail never wags the dog. and leading the horse to the 

lovely pure-water trough and making him fill up are two essentially 

different propositions. 

» » » 

The United States was made industrially great by the Open 

Shop American plan, which allowed everybody to seek honest work 
and barred no American boys from learning honest trades. Why 
not preserve the plan that made us great? 
» « » 

America may as well face the problem that if a labor trust or 

any other trust is allowed to dominate our industries and scare our 
lawmakers we may as well turn over to the Japs, the republic our 
freedom-loving forefathers fought to establish. 



Another citizen has been found dead on the street with marks 

of having been run over. "Heart disease may have been the cause 
of death. He suffered from it." says the autopsy surgeon, 
with a steel heart would suffer from it these days. 



A man 



San Francisco News Letter and 



DIToBIAL, 




Cornelius Vanderbilt, Jr., who seems to 
Phelan's Fight Started It be one of the few young newspapermen 
with originality, has printed the opinions 
of many persons on the Japanese problem. The impression that 
one gets from the answers to Vanderbilt's letters of inquiry, is that 
the anti-Japanese fever is far more of a political spasm than a real 
outburst of apprehension, caused by threatened danger to our white 
civilization on the Pacific Coast. 

Very significant is the answer of Calvin Cobb, editor of the Ida- 
ho Statesman, who wrote Vanderbilt: 

'The Oriental menace does not interest me greatly. We made 
the same howl about the Chinese, and the Coast has lost the labor 
of these men, just at the time it was most needed. In Idaho we 
agitated the Japanese question and practically all our Japanese la- 
borers have gone." 

It is a most astonishing thing that there should be the least doubt 
about the cause of the anti-Japanese crusade, and the merits of the 
recent agitation. The crusade was started by former Senator James 
D. Phelan of California to strengthen his canvas for reelection and 
he certainly showed great acumen in making the expulsion of the 
Japanese his main contention. What may be thought of the sin- 
cerity of his agitation is quite a different matter. Practical politici- 
ans saw, at once, that Mr. Phelan had selected an effective slogan, 
for prejudice of race is ingrained on the Pacific Coast, where agitat- 
ors had been busily at work for fifty years. The Kearney agitation 
against the Chinese kept San Francisco in a ferment for years. The 
"Sandlot," now the Civic Centre of San Francisco, was the original 
forum of anti-Chinese soapbox orators. 

Having the money and a talent for politics. Senator Phelan in 
last year's campaign, stirred up all the latent race dislike of Orient- 
als in California. Almost in a day, he galvanized the old anti- 
Chinese feeling, and directed it against the totally unoffending and 
decidedly useful Japanese workers. No doubt, if Japan had not had 
an established record for defending her subjects in foreign lands as 
well as at home, we should have seen a repetition of outrages such 
as the Sandlot agitators committed against Chinese coolies. There 
were no laundries burned down, however, nor Japanese beaten on 
the streets, but the flames of racial hatred raged, as the Democratic 
orators stirred fires of partisanship. That Senator Phelan did not 
carry California, in spite of its great Republican majority, was due 
to the popularity of his opponent, Samuel M. Shortridge, and the 
extraordinary fight waged in the San Francisco Chronicle by its 
proprietor, M. H. de Young. Perhaps never in its history had the 
leading Republican newspaper of the Pacific Coast made such an 
effort for Republican success. 

Even at that, the racial prejudice which the Phelan orators had 
inflamed, raged so fiercely that some cool practical politicians be- 
lieved the Democratic candidate for Senator would win. Phelan 
was beaten, but the large vote he received, was proof of his sagacity 
in selecting an effective slogan for his campaign. It is thought by 
weM-informed persons, that the rich politician expended at least 
$250,000, out of his own pocket, to carry his anti-Japanese cam- 
paign to every corner of his State. The Federal officeholders also 
helped. Years must elapse before the effects of that strenuous po- 
litical effort can be erased. The industrious, unoffending Japanese 
has been saddled with all the unpopularity of the Chinese coolie. 

It is a remarkable, and by no means encouraging fact, that the 
canvass of a single rich man for reelection to the United States Sen- 
ate, should have been sufficient to cause international friction with 



a nation, hitherto very friendly, and whose cordial commercial re- 
lations with us could not fail to be of great advantage. It is doubt- 
ful if that brand of statesmanship will hasten the development of 
the Pacific Coast, even if it should exclude Japanese labor. 

We see in the anti-Japanese crusade of Mr. Phelan, one of the 
bad effects of the direct election of United States Senators. It is 
by demagogic appeals to the masses, that candidates can help their 
cause regardless of the consequences to their country. 

* * * 

The object of Archibald Marshall's 
Social Revolution Far Away visit to the United States is to study 
our country home life and compare it 
with English country life, in which style of literary work the London 
visitor has shown himself a delightful writer. He will visit Virginia, 
New England, the Middle West and California. 

The feeling of restlessness in young men and women that has 
been ascribed to England by some writers has not been observed by 
Mr. Marshall. He notes that there is still a very kindly feeling be- 
tween English country people and their servants. In city life there 
is a more obvious social strata. But in the country the lines be- 
tween the English employer and employe are not so sharply drawn. 
Old servants are entirely satisfied and in many cases consider them- 
selves practically members of the family. The long-prophesied so- 
cial revolution is still far away. 

Some good may come of the observations of Novelist Marshall in 
America, for no doubt he will describe what he sees and thinks, in 
his usual sane and convincing manner. 

* * * 

The parade of the anti-Volsteaders in 
Parade of Wet-Protesters New York, is only the start of the pop- 
ular demonstrations against sumptuary 
laws in the United States. The American people are not the kind 
that will lie down, patiently, under deprival of their personal liberties. 
America is made up of nationalists that have been fighting fanatic- 
ism for centuries. 

Prohibition of food, drink, or tobacco, is but a new application 
of the old religious fanaticisms that dictated to mankind what road 
they should take to heaven. Except one followed the ritual pre- 
scribed by the priests, he was straightway consigned to hell, having 
first been burned to death in the public market place as a salutary 
lesson to heretics. 

We now wonder that mankind could ever have been at the mercy 
of those ancient priesthoods that held sway, when the world was 
emerging from the mists of savage superstitions. The priests of Mo- 
lech professed divine warrant for human sacrifices as the most laud- 
able methods of propiating heaven. The world having become more 
materialistic, moral crusaders seem less concerned in our souls than 
in what we are doing with our bodies. They are inspired by the na- 
tural tnedency of mankind to tyrannize over all who are willing to 
submit to slavery. Only the bold and defiant who resist tyranny, 
can hope to escape it. There is no such thing as going along peace- 
ably, in your own way, turning to aggressors the right cheek when 
they smite you on the left, except you wish to have your gravestone 
decorated with the sign, "Here lies the remains of a Miserable Mol- 
lycoddle." 

The anti-Volstead majority shows good judgment in beginning 
to demonstrate in earnest. Nothing has more potent influence on 
politicians at Washington than demonstrations of organized majori- 
ties. For the meek and lowly who patiently accept insult and in- 
jury, the politicians have only contempt. 

* # ¥ 
Expensive Talent. 

In the United Stales Senate discussion on the Norris bill, to 
create a $100,000,000 corporation to help farmers market their 
products profitably, there was considerable talk about the fine talent 
that Uncle Sam is getting in Washington from his lawmakers, for 
next to nothing. "There are 100,000 men getting measly salaries 
of $7,500" interjected one grave and underpaid Senator. But he 
did not add that there are $50-a-month men pretending to be wise 
lawmakers and drawing salaries ten times what they would earn in 



California Advertiser for July 9, 1921 



private life. As our distinguished ex-Senator Jim Phelan has said, 
out openly at a Palace Hotel banquet, where he was tickling the 
ears of Democracy, "Congress! What is it? A body made up of 
fourth-rate lawyers who can't earn a living at home." 

* * * 

Credit must be given to Secretary Hoover 
Hoover's Wise Words for his opposition to the Norris bill to plunge 

our nation into a boom scheme of finance 
for planters, who do not desire to throw their cotton and sugar on 
the falling market. Let private capital try to solve such problems 
before the National Government interferes, was in effect the advice 
of Secretary Hoover. No better could be given. Never has any 
government ever been able to make all its people happy and pros- 
perous at once, and the more that governments have interfered with 
the great economic laws, the greater the disastrous consequences. 

It is the legitimate province of private banks to help their cus- 
tomers over the difficulties of moving crops to market, and returning 
a profit. When such private aid is impossible, and public calamity 
impends, is time enough for government help; but the less paternal- 
ism we have at Washington the longer our Republic will hang to- 
gether. We should never forget that the counter-strains of selfish 
interests will continually test our national solidity and threaten it 
with disintegration. 

* * * 

The comments of the Manchester Guardian 
An English Criticism on Admiral Simms' much-advertised speech 
are of interest on both sides of the Atlantic, 
as the Guardian is one of the most influential British newspapers and 
noted for its frankness of expression as well as its clearness of per- 
ception. 

jThe Guardian considers that the Admiral's speech was an indis- 
creet outbreak in which he forgot certain important facts. 

"Whenever a foreigner takes a slashing part in our party poli- 
tics," remarks the Guardian, "even when we may not know he is 
doing it — there is an inevitable impulse among his English hearers 
or readers to notice the points that he has forgotten. Among the 
many points forgotten by the distinguished American sailor- whom 
we all like, even when he puts us into passing difficulties — are the 
facts that the Sinn Fein party and murder gangs who profess to be 
doing its work are just about as distinct from each other as the 
British Government and the other murder gangs who profess to be 
doing its work. The most striking point in Ireland's relation to the 
Great War was not the insane effort of a few wild extremists to help 
the Germans, but the great number and excellent quality of the Irish 
soldiers who abounded not only in Irish. Australian, and Canadian, 
but in English and even in Scottish regiments; and that an even 
more remarkable degree of participation by Irishmen in the over- 
throw of Germany was only prevented by the folly of the few anti- 
Irish politicians at t tie War office and elsewhere who choked off the 
great recruiting movement started by John Redmond. By ignoring 
such facts while he stresses others. Admiral Sims, no doubt with the 
best intentions, assimilates himself to an intemperate kind of English 
party man. It is a pity, because it is painful to find any fault at all 
with a great officer in the navy of a friend. It is seldom indeed that 
any officer in that most admirable American service can be accused 
of saying a word too much or too little, even in the way of a friend- 
liness that outruns knowledge or discretion." 

The wisest course for a soldier or sailor is to leave the oratory 
to the politicians who are paid for that kind of service. 

Is it possible that the Bank of Italy. 
San Francisco Opportunities which was little more than a name 

in 1904. has grown to the titanic 
dimensions of a representative Pacific Coast banking institution, 
with 267.206 depositors and deposits amounting to over $170,000.- 
000. A pioneer has to rub his eyes and stare again and again at the 
new edifice of the Bank of Italy at Market and Powell streets before 
the fact is fully borne in on him. that the miracle has been wrought, 
and by men who make no claim to be wizards. Business men who 
saw their opportunity is all that the creators of the Bank of Italy- 
claim for themselves. Wher. one notes what they have accomplished 



in a few years, the thought is inseparable that San Francisco herself 
might have surpassed what she has done. It is not pleasant to carp 
at one's own town, but it is hard to choke down the thought that if 
our city had gone ahead as fast as Los Angeles our population to- 
day would be much over three millions. 

We are aware, of course, that the disaster of 1906 would have 
staggered any community. We met our ill fortune heroically, and re- 
built our city, but have we preserved the lion's heart displayed in 
the indomitable enterprise bequeathed to us by our pioneer fore- 
runners? 

The Bank of Italy has grown out of the ashes of the great fire 
of 1904. A quarter of a million dollars was about the total of its 
resources in 1904, but in 1908, just four years after, the business 
section of San Francisco had been wiped out, Amadeo P. Giannini 
and his associates had managed to increase the resources of their 
young bank ten times over. They attracted attention, of course. 
Enterprising people always do. "Let us see how far they advance 
in the next four years," said critics who believed that banks attain- 
ed their maximum size in one spurt and thenceforth became en- 
shrouded in moss-grown conservatism till they dried up and blew 
away. But A. P. Giannini and his associates were a new order of 
bankers who believed that banking is not some sacred and mysteri- 
ous transaction, in no wise resembling active commercial business, 
but is a vital part of commercial business itself and as responsive to 
earnest hustle and legitimate publicity as any form of enterprise. 
So admirably did the new financiers of the Bank of Italy conduct 
their growing institution that in eight years they could boast of $12,- 
000.000. 

And they did boast. Not in a vainglorious and foolish style, but 
like sensible business men who felt the ground secure under them. 
They had grasped the importance of letting the world know what 
you are doing when it is laudable and you wish to advance still bet- 
ter. Hide not your light under a bushel. Resort to the infallible 
medium of printer's ink. 

The Bank of Italy people are the first bankers in America who 
have applied business publicity to their enterprises. Great Eastern 
banks are now imitating them. They have taken the public into 
their confidence, and as always happens, the public has responded 
by helping to make the Bank of Italy one of the most astonishingly 
successful banking institutions in the Unit-d States. In the com- 
paratively brief space of seventeen years it has progressed from 
the mere nucleus of a bank to a gigantic concern with over a quarter 
of a million of depositors and over $170,000,000 of deposits. 

Who can doubt that Mr. A. P. Giannini and his associates will 
manage their great bank in its maturity as wisely as in its infancy. 
They are men in the full flush of manhood. They have stood the 
greatest ordeal. 

What they have done so well is the best guarantee of what they 
will do henceforth. The are Californians to the manor born and 
we are all proud of their great work. 



The bank statements which are appearing in the News Letter 

should carry conviction that San Francisco is the money centre of 
the Pacific Coast. It will remain so. 

* * » 

Bishop Moreland's splendid letters on the divorce evil which 

have appeared in the New York Times have attracted a great deal 
of favorable attention. 

Thirty-nine million dollars worth of real estate sold in San 

Francisco during the year, announces Thomas Magee and Sons, the 
noted authorities. What prosperity and building there would be in 
San Francisco under the Open Shop, American Plan! 

» » * 

Says Helen Bullet Lowry in the New York Times: "There was 

a Stone Age and a Bronze Age. Each ran its cycle, with its passions 
and its pains and its follies, and jogged at last into its place in his- 
tory. Other ages followed, including one called the Age of Reason. 
until now we have come to the Age of Legislation. Hardly a week 
passes but somebody has an idea for legislating more morals into 
us. 



San Francisco News Letter and 



Can the Old Become Young? 

Serious Setback for the Gland Theory 
By HARVEY BROUGHAM 



ONE of ihe oldest delusions in the world is that a magician 
might give you something out of a bottle to renew Youth. 
The beauty parlors are a modification of that idea, and many 
of the magicians who run them make large profits out of the creduli- 
ty of the fair sex. 

Recently there has been much publicity given to the theory that 
by grafting glands of vigorous animals in aged human beings the 
virility can be restored. There shall be no old and senile persons 
lagging superfluous on the stage, or tottering towards the open 
grave. All will be youth and vigor. The old Lotharios will get a 
new set of sexual glands, robbed from some monkey, and will retrace 
the primrose paths as lusty and sensual as in their salad days. The 
ancient sinners' gray locks will be replaced by Hyperion curls and 
their tottering steps by the firm tread of young athletes, whose blood 
courses at fever heat in the excitement of early manhood. 

It is astonishing how many people accept that deception. In 
fact, the whole world is something of a believer, for every man and 
woman thinks that a doctor can give them a prescription, and the 
apothecary's nauseating drugs will restore health. But in truth the 
doctor can restore nothing. He may change conditions in the pa- 
tient's system, but the utmost of his power goes no further than to 
make it easier for Nature to give back the patient's strength. 

No surgeon or magician has yet located the true fountain of 
Youth. Ponce de Leon was supposed to have discovered it in Flor- 
ida, in the sixteenth century, but today we know that the world is 
as far away as ever from the miraculous spring. 

The substitution of monkeys' glands for the senile glands of aged 
persons has been given much publicity by a certain kind of doctors, 
who are always on the alert for some fad to excite their credulous 
victims. The appendicitis fad has had its day. Millions of opera- 
tions have been performed on the theory that Nature made a mis- 
take in giving man a vermiform appendix. It might have been of 
some service to him a million years ago, but whatever the purpose 
its present use is but to endanger the owner's life. So the medicos 
say, and doctors have been cutting people up by thousands to save 
them from the ill effects of Nature's clumsy work. How far that 
surgical fad has been carried, may be judged by the fact that in 
one little burg in the Middle West a young doctor, fresh from col- 
lege, operated on 120 of the three hundred citizens within a year 
of his hanging out his shingle. The amount of money paid doctors 
for removing vermiform appendices would pay our national debt 
several times. 

But the fad of restoring age to youth, exceeds all. others in its 
money-getting possibilities. The aged people who desire for pro- 
longation of life are nearly all prosperous. The poor and miserable 
long for death as a happy end of their sorrows. Frequent references 
to that are found in the ancient classic writings. "Whom the gods 
love, die young," was the belief of the ancients. The early Greek 
playwrights frequently represented old men as buffoons to furnish 
laughter. Aristophanes, who lived nearly five centuries before 
Christ, was given to ridiculing the aged. Seldom has the stage been 
generous to old age, by giving it an heroic representation. Age is 
usually depicted as either pitiable or absurd. Golden youth is what 
the .playwrights most desire to fashion into dramatic tableaux. 

The new school of surgeons who advocate restoration of golden 
youth by the use of monkeys' interstitial glands have recently re- 
ceived a severe jar by the death of a wealthy London septuagenarian 
named Alfred Wilson. He had tried the gland experiment, as per- 
formed by Dr. Eugen Steinbach of Vienna. Steinbach has been for 
many years a professor at the University of Vienna. It is claimed 
that he is the original discoverer of the part which the sex glands 
play in the living organisms. He has been regarded as a serious 



scientist. He arrived at the conclusion that the process of aging is 
not altogether an incurable disease, which we face helplessly. It 
can be influenced by substitution of young sex glands. His experi- 
ments on the influence of sexual glands on aging animals were begun 
on rats. Results showed that the grafting of young interstitial 
glands rejuvenated the whole organism physicially as well as mental- 
ly. Old rats regained their youth, showing in appearance, habits 
and instincts the characteristics of young ones. Their lives, Stein- 
bach claimed, were lengthened as much as one quarter of their 
natural duration. 

Very soon physicians became greatly interested in Professor 
Steinbach's results, and under his .personal direction the work was 
being tested out on human subjects. This new course has proved his 
achievements to be of an enormous practical importance, as reju- 
venation is not only possible in the animal, but also in the human 
subject, it was claimed. 

While in rats a new growth of hair and abolishment of senile 
cataract of the eye was accomplished, the revival of the interstitial 
gland in man led to the following results, according to Steinbach's 
desciples: Abolition of the senile atrophy of the muscles, the return 
of physicial and mental activity, and possibly a cure of the senile 
hypertrophy of the prostate gland. 

The process was simplified, so that in Steinbach's words, it "be- 
came a fifteen-minute operation, absolutely painless and free of 
risk." Seven to ten days in the hospital were all that was required. 
He described the happiness of a patient who applied for treatment, 
a weary widower. "Now he is full of joy, activity and enterprise, 
and is thinking of a new marriage." 

"We stand in the beginning only. I shall not live to see that 
every man and every woman will want to fight age (up to a certain 
limit). Reaction and envy still oppose the idea. But the day will 
come. I have shaken up mankind, and the thought that virility can 
be revived by a resurrection of the internal secretion will not let 
humanity rest henceforth." 

But the death of the wealthy Londoner, Alfred Wilson, has re- 



MONEY- 



DEPOSITED IN OUR 

TIME DEPOSIT DEPARTMENT 

ON OR BEFORE 

JULY 11th 

WILL DRAW INTEREST FROM JULY 
FIRST AT THE CURRENT RATE OF 
INTEREST, WHICH AT PRESENT IS 



4% 



Amd 

Bmim 



mcmm 



CALIFORNIA AND MONTGOMERY STREETS 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

WinJov &Co- 14 



California Advertiser jot July 9, 1921 

duced some of the enthusiasm of Doctor Steinbach's desciples over 
the scientific triumph of surgery. Wilson was impressed by the mir- 
acles wrought in Vienna and desiring to change his aging condition 
for some semblance of his salad youth, took the cure at Steinbach's 
hands. It was a perfect operation and the rich Londoner returned 
to his home to spread the fame of his surgical benefactor. He was 
overwhelmed by letters from old men asking for details of his re- 
markable experience, and, in order to prove a benefactor announc- 
ed a public lecture on his rejuvenation. His friends took it for 
granted that he had actually defeated Father Time, but twelve hours 
before the announced lecture he died, suddenly, and dramatically. 
Now there is a fervid discussion whether the aged Londoner had 
been physically improved by the operation or just psychologically 
animated by the suggestion of regaining his youthful vigor. Anyhow 
he is dead, though the medical examination determined that the 
operation at Vienna had been done so skillfully, that not even a scar 
was left on the body. 

The conclusion of sane people on the subject, is that there is 



no hope for mankind in the fight against senility by substituting the 
glands of lecherous monkeys and amorous billygoats for the natural 
human glands outworn by age. That the sexual glands have a 
powerful effect on an organism is unquestioned. The glands deter- 
mine what is called the "secondary sex characteristics," but the day 
will never come when a surgeon can incorporate those sexual glands 
in an old man's system and make him a rollicking young blade at 
seventy. 

The fate of all mundane organisms is to grow old and die. If 
some organisms last longer, it is because they have come from a 
sturdier stock or been better conserved. The evident scheme of 
Nature is that this world's population shall always be young. Multi- 
tudes die every day and younger forms step into the places of the 
dead. Look at our streets, our theatres, everywhere that humanity 
congregates. The majority of people are in the vigor of youth. The 
graybeards are comparatively few. They have had their day and 
passed. 



isam 



A NEW 

Telephone Directory 

For San Francisco and Bay Counties 

Including Oakland, Alameda 

and Berkeley 

WILL GO TO PRESS 
JULY 9, 1921 



Please arrange for any change you may de- 
sire in present listings or advertising as soon 
as possible and not later than the above date 



THE PACIFIC TELEPHONE 
AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY 



San Francisco News Letter and 







Sense of Proportion Lost. 

Yes! The fisticuff encounter in New Jersey was a great and 
glorious victory for America, and to the soles of his shoes the 
TOWN CRIER quivers with patriotic delight that Mr. Dempsey's 
"haymaker" made Monsieur Georges think he had run foul of a 
thousand horsepower thrashing machine. But between our- 
selves as Americans, we might have done something better 
with all the money that was contributed to get the French champion 
a good licking. He was already able to write a fat check, and he 
goes home so much richer than he came, that he will own half the 
tourist hotels in Paris. Mr. Dempsey, too, was an important figure 
at the bank, before he got his slice of the half million for fifteen 
minutes' exercise at New Jersey. The biblical verse: To him that 
hath shall be given, and from him that hath not, shall be taken 
away even that which he hath," has had another instructive verifi- 
cation. Are we not losing all sense of proportion in the United 
States? We whoop up to utmost limit of insanity, a boxing match 
at New Jersey, and simultaneously shake the club of public morality 
at those who would quaff a glass of 5 per cent beer, or gladden their 
meals with a bottle of claret. We bully and jail honest citizens 
whom we rob of their personal liberties, and glorify the commission 
of a felony, by patronizing a public prize fight attended by many 
of the most aristocratic people in American society. 

Is it to be wondered at, that a Tokio editor smarting under the 
opposition to his race in America wrote, "You consider yourselves 
superior to Asiatics. But in what consists your superiority? We 
Japanese have an old civilization, with its social codes of respect and 
its temples of reverence. What have you besides skyscrapers, apart- 
ment-houses, divorces and prize fighters?" No doubt that Tokio 
bird will flutter his wings again, when he reads all about the New 
Jersey affair and the attendance of our social elite in the boxes. 

California Scores. 

Is California to be congratulated on the fact, that it has scored an 
important point in the manufacture of movie pictures ? The two-mil- 
lion-dollar studio on Long Island is to be closed down this month. 
Eastern conditions have been proved inferior to Californian, and 
make the movie "art" more costly. This should add new figures to 
the salaries of California screen Vamps, for the competition in the 
sex-drama is already fierce. Every deadwall in San Francisco is al- 
most at the burning point with torrid posters, depicting lechery and 
fornication in their most tense moments. We have not got to the 
stage which the lawyers call "in flagrante delictu," to save the 
blushes of their stenographers who type divorce complaints, but some 
daring Screen Napoleon is sure to cross the Alps before long. In- 
stead of fade-outs at the psychological moment, where the villain 
has the stainless Venus of the cannery stretched over a pile of to- 
mato cans, the camera men will go right on cranking and the picture 
will be a hummer, that will call for night and day performances, to 
satisfy the crowds. Sex-drama posters are now the recognized art 
decoration of all vacant lots. When posters are broadened a little 
more in their scope, landlords will start pulling down their buildings 
that pay unsatisfactory interest, and putting up three-story fences 
for "Vamp" announcements. The imagination is staggered by the 
possibilities. The engineers of the bridge to Oakland, should take 
into consideration the revenue to be derived from vamp posters 
along the parapets. Oaklanders are said to be perfect nuts on the 
sex movies. 



It was twenty-five years ago that the first female cigarette smoker 
appeared in American society. Baroness de Struve, wife of the 



Russian Ambassador, produced her cigarette at her first diplomatic 
dinner at Washington. Doubtless there was surprise. 

But the spectators didn't call it "fast" then. Indeed, they called 
it "mannish." The Baroness stayed in the dining room 'with the 
men and joined the women after smoking. 

Next came another ladyship — Countess Cassini, member of the 
household of another Russian Ambassador, who instituted not only 
cigarettes, but morning levees in boudoirs. Cigarettes were well es- 
tablished in diplomatic circles among wives of our American Am- 
bassadors, returned from "foreign parts," long before American so- 
ciety at home actually took up the habit. 

The American aristocracy has been learning from Europe and 
our bourgeoie has been copying our aristocracy of wealth. So wo- 
men of many kinds now smoke in America. The habit is spread- 
ing. 

This year at Vassar college quite a flurry was caused as cigar- 
ette stubs were littering up the campus. There was talk of expelling 
the girls who smoked — until investigation discovered that they would 
have to expel nearly half the college. A compromise was struck 
by the student governing body's ruling that no smoking be allowed 
on the campus. 




Ihe trecu 
secret of coffee- 
roastind-produeei 
the wondrous flavor 

©wells 

^^^ NATIONAL CREST 



Qff 




The EYE and the BRAIN 

Poor Memory, Headache, Dizziness, Weak, 
Inflamed, Smarting, Sensitive or Gluey 
Eyes, Floating Spots. Crusty or Granu- 
lated Eyelids, Astigmatism, Watery Eyes 
and inability to see objects clearly — all 
these symptoms and many other ailments 
can be directly or indirectly attributed to 
EYE STRAIN. 
TO RELIEVE THESE AILMENTS YOU 

MUST REMOVE THE CAUSE 
The latest and most scientific instrument* 
are used in examining children's eyes and 
complicated cases of eye defects. 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

EXCLUSIVE EYESIGHT SPECIALIST 

Charter Member American Association of 

Opticians 

27 Years in San Francisco 

960 MARKET STREET 

Between Mason and Taylor 
SAN FRANCISCO 



California Advertiser for July 9, 1921 



V/////////////MW//M/M^^^ 



Y/<Y/r/r<rr/r/r////////^^^^^ 



Pacific Gas 
and Electric 
Company 
1st Preferred 
Stock to 
Yield 7V 2 % 



Intelligent Investment 
is Based on Facts 



In the present business situation, the one fact of paramount 
importance to investors is such stability of earning power as will 
assure uninterrupted income. 

For the information of more than 1 3,000 present investors in 
Pacific Gas and Electric Company First Preferred 6 per cent 
Stock, and for the guidance of others who are seeking a safe 
channel for the investment of their funds, we present a few con- 
vincing facts on this important question. 



Fact 1. 



Fact 2. 



Fact 3. 



Fact 4. 



<Five years' earnings — January 1, 1916, to December 31, 1920: 

Total Profits Available for Preferred Stock Dividends $16,460,000 

Total Preferred Stock Dividends Paid 7,643,000 

Excess of Profits over Dividends — Margin of Safety $ 8,817,000 

Latest earnings — Twelve months to May 31, 1921: 

Surplus Available for Preferred Stock Dividends $ 4.299,000 

Preferred Stock Dividends 1.918,000 

Excess of Surplus over Dividends — Margin of Safety $ 2,381.000 

In the seven years since the Company's first offering of its First Preferred 6 per cent 
Stock to its customers, it has added 220.000 new customers, invested $40,350,000 of new 
capital in additional facilities and increased its business by $18,600,000. The margin 
of safety for the Preferred Stock Dividends has also increased substantially. If. how- 
ever, the Company had not added a single dollar to its annual surplus in these seven 
years, it would still be earning enough to pay the dividends on the entire amount of Pre- 
ferred Stock now outstanding. 

The hook value of the Company's plants and properties at December 31, 1920. was $164,- 
655.000, of which $91,875,000. or 56 per cent, represents new construction and ac- 
quisitions made in the last fifteen years. The above earnings are. therefore, on a firm 
foundation, being amply supported by property value irrespective of capitalization. 



At the present price, the investment in this stock yields 7]/z per cent. Dividends paid by check every three months. 

It is non-assessable and non-callable; 

exempt from Personal Property Tax in California; 

exempt from Normal Federal Individual Income Tax. 

Give orders or apply for further particulars to 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company— Stock Sales Dept. 

445 Sutter Street. San Francisco, California 



_= 



•: ■'■M/t/M/ffim 



10 



San Francisco News Letter and 





^HNANCIALV 




HOLIDAYS ARE ALWAYS in the way of 
active dealings in business and when three 
holidays com: in quick succession with a big 
prize fight thrown in to take a man's atten- 
tion away from business and these holidays 
come in the summer time when the vacation 
bug holds sway and when, in the East, at 
the money-heart of the nation. New York, it 
is sweltering hot, an apathy falls on business 
which is almost like a paralysis. If we were 
to take the present week's condition in trade 
as an indication of what the condition really 
is we would have to report that conditions 
were indeed bad. But this would not be 
fair. 

As a matter of fact, the conditions in the 
nation have in reality made some solid im- 
provement in the last week. In fact, the im- 
provement is steadily going forward and it 
is along the lines of trade in the staples that 
are essential. This is true of domestic and 
foreign business as well. There are pratical- 
ly no sales in luxuries. We have reached 
the limit as far as the reduction of our ex- 
ports are concerned and there is a visible 
improvement now the other way. Imports 
are steadily increasing, though this increase 
is a very slow one. 

Gradually there seems to be a settled feel- 
ing that good times are creeping on toward 
us and this idea squares with actual events. 
As the countries of Europe and Latin Ameri- 
ca and Asia become more nearly normal, as 
the exchange situation is thereby improved, 
the conditions in all countries and especially 
in this country will certainly improve. There 
are influences, nationally and locally, affect- 
ing business that are only indirectly connect- 
ed with the situation brought on, as a result 
of the war, in foreign countries. These in- 
fluences depend on the line-up between cap- 
ital and labor. Things are more or less out 
of joint industrially, but they are being 
smoothed out and the necessary recession in 
wages gradually has been taking place. Lo- 
cally the industrial situation is slowly im- 
proving. On some of the big jobs down 
town men are at work. They are not as 
numerous yet, but they are working. In the 
outlying districts in house construction there 
is a very apparent activity and the number 
of men at work is increasing perceptibly 
every day. It may be safely prophecied thai 
the AMERICAN PLAN has come to stay. 

There are rumors afloat that the recent 
settlement by the employing printers' associ- 
ation of this city has left much bad blood 
and dissatisfaction in its wake. The em- 
ployers are finding difficulty in saddling ad- 
ditional cost on printing for their patrons. 
Many large jobs are finding their way out of 
the city, some of these are going to Los An- 



geles and others have found their way to 
Chicago. It is being predicted that there is 
going to be a break among the employing 
printers and that a number are just about 
ready to declare for the Open Shop or Am- 
erican plan. Those who are in touch with 
the situation say that some such step by 
those who are in the employing printers' as- 
sociation is inevitable. When the break is 
to take place they are not prepared to say. 

SHIPPING — In shipping circles, as far as 
the strike situation is concerned, there is a 
feeling of confidence that the owners have 
won, which hitherto has not been in evid- 
ence. Vessels are coming in and leaving on 
an almost normal schedule and in conse- 
quence of this fact the operators are jubi- 
lant. Here again the American plan is work- 
ing out to the satisfaction of all concerned. 
The union men would like to return to work 
and accept the situation as a logical out- 
come of the war and the neessary recession 
as to wage, but the leaders of labor have 
placed themselves in a position from which 
it is very difficult to recede and still save 
their faces. 

The Shipping Board shows more activity 
since Lasker came in as its head. He is fol- 
lowing the policies of Benson and has, as 

yet, proposed but few innovations. 
* * * 

INSURANCE— At last the Fire Commis- 
sioners of San Francisco have taken action 
and placed the two fire boats in commission. 
Fire boat No. I has as its captain J. F. 
Kearny; No. 2 is commanded by Captain 
Silvic Rocca. The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS 

LETTER has hammered away asking that 
the boats be re-commissioned. That we have 
not had more fires and more disastrous ones 
during the period these boats were partially 
or entirely laid up is only to be charged to 
chance. The boats should be in commission 
at all times and they should be permanent 
units of the fire department and no question 
should ever again be raised as to their use- 
fulness. 

The adjustment board which it is pro- 
posed shall have the power to adjust all 
grievances and difficulties that may arise has 
progressed last week until it is a reality. A 
committee of the Insurance Brokers' Ex- 
change consisting of live wires such as Paul 
Nathan. O. J. Beyfus and C. D. Babcock, 
were appointed by that prince of good fel- 
lows, B. F. Brisac. the Chairman to go into 
all the details in arranging meetings with 
other organizations — the Board of Fire Un- 
derwriters of the Pacific, the California As- 
sociation of Insurance Agents, and others. 
Thus differences between insurance men will 



be handled by men who know something 
about insurance. Conferences .between these 
newly created committees will begin at once. 



MINING — Despite the holidays and the at- 
tendant unsympathetic attitude toward min- 
ing ventures in financial circles, mining 
stocks are holding firm. There is not much 
trading and interest in what is going on 
shows great dullness at the mining exchange. 
The strike at Tonopah is still on and both 
sides seem to be holding so firm that they 
will not give in. 



THE BANK OF NATIONS— It is a very 
dull day in Washington when some one 
doesn't come forward with something new in 
the way of financing matters as regards 
world trade. Now comes forward Senator 
Hitchcock of Nebraska with a scheme for 
the Bank of Nations. The bank is to have 
a capital of two billions of dollars. It is 
proposed that the Treasury Department shall 
subscribe to the stock in sufficient amount to 
control the bank. The measure, as propos- 
ed bv Senator Hitchcock would provide 
$900,000,000 of stock that could be sold to 
solvent governments admitted to participa- 
tion under treaties or trade agreements neg- 
otiated by the President. The funds of the 
bank would be used to promote internation- 
al trade and credit and stabilize exchange. 
The bank would have the power to lend 
money, deal in securities and issue notes, 
and currency, with a thirty-three per cent 
reserve. The bill is now in the hands of the 
Banking committee. 

The figures have been given out for the 
month of May which show a decline of ex- 
ports from San Francisco. It may be safely 
assumed that the declension has been stop- 
ped. There is not much if any trading in 
domestic or foreign trade in what might be 
termed luxuries, but there is an unmistak- 
able increase in trading in the staple com- 
modities — the line of necessities, and a tour 
among the largest and most permanent ex- 
porters and importers uncovers a most opti- 
mistic and buoyant tone as to trade. 

In domestic trade there is also an increas- 
ed demand for the actual neccessities and 
not much for the luxuries. The big stores 
all report improved business. The buyers 
are very cautious and they shop more than 
they usually do and the shopping habit it 
seems, has caught the men buyers in its 
thrall. This is a new thing in the West and 
is only indicative of the care that is being 
taken to get all that can be got out of the 
dollar. En passant, that very dollar will buy 
more now than it has for some time in the 
past. 

With the resumption of activity in the 
building line there has also come an increas- 
ed demand for real estate and this is especi- 
ally true not only as to suburban homes but 
for small farm land tracts. 



California Advertiser for July 9, 1921 



11 



SUGAR CONSUMPTION IN U. S. MAKES 
NEW HIGH RECORD 

Sugar consumption in the United States 
will make a new high record in the fiscal 
year ending with this month. The quantity 
imported from foreign countries, says a state- 
ment by The National City Bank of New 
York, was greater in the ten months for 
which figures are now available than in the 
corresponding period of any preceding year. 
The domestic production of the year was 
bigger than ever before, and the exporta- 
tion only about one-half that of the corre- 
sponding ten months of the preceding year. 
We may not be surprised if the official figures 
showing the average per capita consump- 
tion in the fiscal year 1921 run up nearly 
to 100 pounds per capita against 91J/2 
pounds per capita in the fiscal year 1920; 
the former high record year, 82 pounds in 
1919, and 89 pounds per capita in the high 
record pre-war year 1914. 

The total quantity of sugar brought into 
continental United States in the fiscal year 
1921 will not differ materially from that of 
the fiscal year 1920, but the fact that the 
domestic production in the past year ex- 
ceeded that of any earlier year by about a 
half billion pounds and that the exports in 
the current fiscal year are only about one- 
half those of 1920, makes it apparent that 
the quantity available for consumption in 
the fiscal year 1921 will materially exceed 
that of any preceding year. 

Average import prices of raw sugar 
brought from foreign countries ranged from 
8.3c per pound in March, 1920, to 16.1c in 
June, then slowly declined to 15c per pound 
in September, I 1 .3c in November, 9.8c in 
December, 6.1c in January, 1921, and 9.4c 
in March and April, though the average im- 
port price of the raw sugar imported from 
foreign countries in the ten months ending 
with April, 1921, was 10.4c per pound 
against 9.1c in the full fiscal year 1920. 5.6c 
in 1919, and exactly 2c per pound in the 
fiscal year 1914. all of which year preceded 
the war. 

The exports of refined sugar in the fiscal 
year 1921 show a big fall off and will 
amount to but about one-fourth as much as 
in 1920, the total exports of refined sugar 
in the ten months ending with April. 1921, 
having been but 31 1.127,455 pounds against 
1,235,086.004 in the same months of last 
year. 

This increase in consumption by the people 
ol this country will wobably place the United 
States at the head of the list of world's per 
capita consumers of sugar. 



The secretary of the Pennsylvania Board 
of Education tells a story of a small boy 
whom he once heard give a recitation on the 
subject of Atlas with the world on his should- 
ers. Do you know who Atlas was ? he inquired 
ol the boy. Oh, yes. sir, was the reply; he 
wa> a giant who sup^iorted the world. Sup- 
ported the world, did he ? said his questioner. 
But who supported Atlas? The child looked 
somewhat puzzled for a moment, but he 
brightened up almost at once. I guess he 
must have married a rich wife, he replied. 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



Bank of New South Wales 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of Pro- 
prietors 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



$24,655,500.00 
16,750,000.00 



Aggregate Assets. 30th 
Sept. 1920 




$362,336,975.00 



SIR JOHN RUSSELL FRENCH, K. B. E., General Manager 

357 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian States, New Zealand, Fiji, Papua (New 
Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of Australasian Banking 
Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged. 

Head Office: London Office: 

GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET, E. C. 2 

Agents : 
Bank of California, National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nal'l Bank, Crocker Nat'l Bank 



r 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Member of the Federal Reserve System 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement and 7th Avenue 

HA1GHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

DECEMBER 31. 1920 

Assets _...$69,878,I47.01 Capital Actually Paid Up $1,000,000.00 

Deposits 66,338.147.01 Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,540,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund. _ $343,536.85 

OFFICERS 

|OHN A. BUCK. President 

GEO. TOURNY. Vice-Pres. and Manager A. H. R. SCHMIDT, Vice-Pres. and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSE, Vice-President A. H. MULLER, Secretary 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE. Assistant Secretary 

WILLIAM HERRMANN, Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL, Assistant Cashier 

G. A. BELCHER, Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN. Assistant Cashier 

C. W. HEYER. Manager Mission Branch W. C. HFYER. Manager Park-Presidio Dist. Branch 

O. F. PAULSEN, Manager Haight Street Branch 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

JOHN A. BUCK E. T. KRUSE I. N. WALTER A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY A. H. R. SCHMIDT HUGH GOODFELLOW E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. A. CHRISTENSON ROBERT DOLLAR L. S. SHERMAN 

GOODFELLOW. EELLS. MOORE tt ORRICK. General Attorneys 



BOND DEPARTMENT 

THI ANGLO AND LONDON PARIS 

NAIIONAL BANK 



Su ter and Sansome Streets 
Phone Ke*rny 5600 
San Francisco, Cal.f. 



RECOMMENDS 

IRRIGATION DISTRICT BONDS 

FOR INVESTMENT 

THEY ARE more secure than first mortgages because they rank ahead of 
first morgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT. 

Yield from 6 - to 634 % 
Let us send you our booklet THE IRRIGATION DISTRICT BOND 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Company in America.' 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



FIRE AUTOMOBILE WINDSTORM 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 

REASONABLE RATES 



12 



San Francisco News Letter and 




ociot 



4th of July Parties 

APYROTECHNICAL display that made 
the sky brilliant with all of the new- 
est devices in the fireworks line was 
part of the entertainment that Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Templeton Crocker provided for 
their guests at a gala Fourth of July cele- 
bration at their home in Burlingame Monday 
night. The exhibition was exceptionally fine, 
displaying novelties never before seen here. 

The terraced garden was the scene of the 
celebration. Scores of tables, each one dec- 
orated in a vivid style, were scattered about 
the lawn and here the guests were seated for 
supper. Refreshments were served from a 
buffet garlanded with flowers. All of the 
lower part of the Crocker home, which is 
built so that the rooms can be thrown to- 
gether, was used for dancing. The guests 
included most of the Burlingame Country 
Club contingent. 

— The Fourth of July was very gay at 
Bolinas and a number of San Rafael and 
Ross Valley people motored there. Mr. and 
Mrs. Aimer Newhall, who went to their cot- 
tage at Bolinas soon after their arrival from 
Honolulu last week, entertained friends over 
the holiday. 

— The grounds about the lovely Charles 
R. McCormick home in Menlo were the set- 
ting for a large party at which Mr. and Mrs. 
McCormick entertained about fifty of the 
young folk from down the peninsula on Sun- 
day evening. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. Deering and 
Miss Francesca Deering are passing the hol- 
idays at Mission San Jose, where they are 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Moore at 
their country home. The Moore family has 
an immense holding there, and besides the 




159-153 GEARY ST. 

rnar t^/lpp a pel 
'omen 



ion UJc 



ai\i 



SKjle arvcl Quality 

u. itkovit CxtpaVaJaivc 

^ O 





manor house, where Mr. A. A. Moore resides, 
there are homes in the same grounds for all 
the other branches of the family. 

— One of the most enjoyable affairs Sat- 
urday evening was the dance at "The Tow- 
ers," the James Flood home in Menlo Park. 
Miss Mary Emma Flood, Mrs. Marshall Mad- 
ison and Miss Helen Pierce gave the dance 
and the guests were members of different 
house parties. On Monday the same group 
of young people went on a motor picnic in 
the hills. 

Mr. and Mrs. Flood and their daughter 
had for guests over the week Miss Charlotte 
Cromwell and Miss Emily Merriman, two 
Eastern girls; Messrs. Clinton Jones, James 
Kuhn, George Montgomery, Edward Hills 
and James Mcintosh. 

— Mr. and Mrs. William T. Sesnon and 
their daughters had their annual Fourth of 
July house party, which always includes surf 
swimming at the Beach of Santa Cruz. The 
Sesnon home, a spacious edifice of the Span- 
ish mission style, has a parklike estate about 
a mile or so from the beach. They had more 
than a score of guests from town. 

— Fireworks celebration down the penin- 
sula Monday night took place at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Donohie at Menlo 
Park. The guests included the members of 
a party of about fifty that has been enter- 
tained at the home of Miss Mary-Emma 
Flcod over the weekend. 



ENGAGEMENTS 

— Mrs. Helen Leavitt Eaves has written 
from Hollywood that she will be married in 
two months, and it is expected that the wed- 
ding will take place early in September. 
Beyond that, however, there are no plans 
and meantime she remains in the southern 
city, where she is established in an attractive 
bungalow about a block distant from Mr. 
Charles Lawson's family, who recently ar- 
rived from New York and occupy the hand- 
some home of Anita Stewart. 

Mrs. Bradford Leavitt, mother of Mrs. 
Eaves, and her cousin. Miss Marjorie Smith, 
have come up from Hollywood for the sum- 
mer and they are settled at Mrs. Leavitt's 
little cottage at Woodside. 



LUNCHEONS 

— Miss Marjory Wright, daughter of Ma- 
jor-General and Mrs. William Mason Wright, 
who arrived here from Washington, was the 
guest for whom Miss Marie Louise Potter 
gave a luncheon Tuesday at the Woman's 
Athletic Club. Miss Wright was a debutante- 
in Washington two seasons ago, and is a very 
attractive girl, who will be an addition to the 



young society set here and at Burlingame. 
With her parents. Miss Wright will spend the 
week-end with Mr. and Mrs. George T. Ma- 
rye at Burlingame. 

Miss Potter's other guests were Miss Mary 
Emma Flood, Mrs. Kenneth Mcintosh, Miss 
Ruth Hobart, Miss Katherine Kuhn, Miss 
Elizabeth Adams and Miss Josephine Grant. 

— Mr. and Mrs. William Hinckley Taylor 
entertained at a delightful luncheon at their 
home in Piedmont on Sunday afternoon, hav- 
ing about twenty guests to meet Mrs. Char- 
les Snowden Redfield, her daughter. Miss 
Emily Redfield, and her son, LeGrand Red- 
field. 



DINNERS 

— Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Tobin gave a 
dinner at their home in San Mateo for their 
nephew, Richard Raoul-Duval, who left Tu- 
esday for Paris to join his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles Raoul-Duval. The guests in- 
cluded Mr. and Mrs. William G. Parrott, Miss 
Emily Parrott, Miss Josephine Grant, Miss 
Evelyn Barron and Messrs. Richard Tobin 
and John Parrott. 



IN TOWN AND OUT OF TOWN 

— Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Lincoln Brown 
left a few days ago for the East, to be away 
three months. Their son, Abraham Lincoln 
Brown Jr., went with them and will return 
to Harvard. 

—Mr. and Mrs. William Palmer Horn 
have rented a cottage at Bolinas for the 
season and celebrated with a party 4th of 
July. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Louis Titus have taken 
possession of the Burlingame residence they 
recently bought from Mr. and Mrs. Cheever 
Cowdin. Mrs. Titus' sister. Miss Therese 
Rooney, has arrived from Washington with 
the Titus children and are with the family 
at Burlingame. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Carrigan and Mr. 
and Mrs. Andrew Carrigan Jr., motored 
north to the Carrigan ranch in Mendocino 
county on Friday and returned to town Wed- 
nesday. Mr. John Carrigan is also at the 
ranch. 



Tk 



FOR 






.®nn& 



^Management cf 

Halsey E. Manwaring 




California Advertiser for July 9, 1921 



13 



— Mrs. Alexander Garceau and her daugh- 
ter. Miss Margaret Garceau, have gone to 
Wawona to spend a month or six weeks. 
Little Miss Garce<u will return to Paris in 
the fall to resume her studies. 

— Mrs. J. Rupert Mason and her sister, 
Miss Kathryn Masten, have left for a motor 
trip south. They will visit friends at Santa 
Barbara and Los Angeles and will be away a 
fortnight. Mr. Mason will return from the 
East next week and join Mrs. Mason and 
Miss Masten in the south, and motor home 
with them. 

— Mrs. Alan Cline and her small daughter, 
Miss Catherine Cline, left Saturday for Los 
Angeles for two weeks' visit with Mr. Cline's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Cline. The 
Clines have a handsome home in the hills 
near Hollywood, and residing with them are 
their son in law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. 
Gerald Harney, and their two little grand- 
daughters. Miss Geraldine and Miss Virginia 
Harney, the later a wee baby. 

— The sumer colony at Lake Tahoe has 
been augmented during the last week by the 
opening of a number of the best known sum- 
mer homes. Dr. and Mrs. Herbert C. Mof- 
fitt of San Francisco arrived at the Lake Sat- 
urday, celebrating the season's opening with 
a large Fourth of July house party. Dr. and 
Mrs. Philip King Brown, just back from the 
wedding of their son, Hillyer, in the East, 
also are at the Tahoe home for the summer. 
Other cottages opened are those of C. Fred- 
erick Kohl, J. V. Laveaga of Cupertino and 
C. W. Merrill of Berkeley. 

— Miss Marie Louise Baldwin has gone 
to Newport, R. I., to visit her grandparents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Barry Baldwin-Osborne, for the 
remainder of the summer. 

— Miss Florence Moore is entertaining a 
small party over the holidays at her home in 
Mission San Jose. Her marriage to Dr. Wil- 



The Smart Set Beauty Shop 



MR> 



rruimn 



San Francisco Distribute! for 
Mme, L;i tlcure Beautl Piepmn'oni 
Mini ma [>?•!•« 

Bi itlp i ' i iIbi, NaDiculaa 

ranklm KM I klTtll Str«M Su ► 



"BEAUTY SALON"— 
THE POWDER PUFF— 


Now under New Management 


Hair restored to its natural color. 
Hair Dyeing and Bleaching. 


Catherine McNamara — Marcel Waver 

Inez Dere. formerly of the City of Paris 

212 Stockton St. Suite 305 

Pfcom Doofia tiJIQ 





PROF. JOHN A JACKSON 

Instructor of Saimming 

TERMS 

Full Course $10.00 

Single Lesson $1.00. Six Lessons $5.00 

Lurline Baths. Bush ft Lorain Sis. 

Phone FnuruUla 90S 1 



liam Musgrave will be an event of September 
and the many friends of the couple have 
been glad to learn that it will bring them to 
San Francisco to reside. 



CUPID CAUSES PALACE CHANGES 

This week notes a change in the Advertis- 
ing-Publicity department at the Palace. Bon- 
nie Glessner, who for the past two years 
has made a great success as Advertising 
Manager hrs resigned and Willis T. Chap- 
man has been appointed her successor. 

The resignation of Bonnie Glessner follows 
her marriage, several months ago to P. N. 
Wilson, a well known magazine writer and 
newspaper man. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson plan 
making their home in Alameda county. They 
will continue their journalistic endeavors 
there. 

The newly appointed Advertising Manager 
is a well known local newspaper man. For 
the past two years W. T. Chapman has been 
on the editorial staff of The Call-Post where 
he was Aviation Editor. The new publicity 
man at the Palace, during the war, was taken 
'from the line" and placed on the publicity 
staff of The Marine Corps. 



NEW FEATURES AT TECHAU'S 

"Girl-Time" is the name by which the new 
Techau Revue staged and directed by Rene 
Perry is known. Miss Perry has prepared 
a delightful evening's entertainment, and the 
bevy of clever and pretty girls were never 
seen to better advantage. Some of the most 
popular of the numbers include the saucy 
"Soldieretles" drilled by Stella French, and 
"The Morning Rehearsal," featuring Ruby 
Adams. 

The Techau Tavern Orchestra is playing 
all the latest song hits for those who enjoy 
dancing, and the "Lucky" dances are favor- 
ites with their prizes of Melachrino Cigar- 
ettes and Miss Saylor's Chocolates. 

The after-theater suppers attract especi- 
ally large crowds, and the late evening hours 
are particularly popular with the constantly 
growing theatrical and motion picture col- 
ony. 



WOULD MAKE PARIS STARE 

Tire dinners La Boheme at Cafe Mar- 
quard. "the smart place for smart people." 
Geary and Mason streets cannot be excelled 
anywhere in the world. In Paris t hey 
would cost twice what Cafe Marquard 
charges here — $2.50. But one is not lim- 
ited to dinners La Boheme at Cafe Mar- 
quard. for there is a special dinner for 
every night in the week and one is better 
than another. A patron's difficulty is to 
select from the list. So it is with the lunch- 
eons continental style — a variety of 26 de- 
licious dishes to select from at the price of 
90 cents. Partake of one or order all at 
the same cost. It would make a Paris cafe 
proprietor stare in amazement. The busi- 
ness men's luncheon at Cafe Marquard is 
but 75 cents. Then there are the fete sup- 
pers after theater, the cabaret and the danc- 
ing. No smarter place for smart people. 




J. E. BIRMINGHAM 

* * * 

PALACE HOTEL 

* * * 

JEWELS 

* * * 

REMODELING 

* * * 

UNIQUE DESIGNS 

* * * 

FINE JEWELRY 

* * * 

EXPERT 



Main Corridor 

* • * 

Opposite Rose Room 

* * * 

In Platinum 

* * * 

OH Styles Into New 

* * # 

Time-Keeping Watches 

* ¥ * 

Of All Descriptions 

* * * 

Repair Work 



ELECTROLYSIS 

Eye-brows arched and moles, warts and su- 
perfluous hair permanently removed by my 
latest improved multiple needle machine. 
W ork guaranteed. 

MADAM STIVER 

133 Geary St.. Whitney Building. Suite 723 

Phone Douglas 5232 

Oakland. First Nat. Bank Bldg. 

Suite 424. Phone Oakland 2521 



New Yo.k 



Lc.ndci 



A TREATMENT FOR THE SCALP 
AND HAIR. Scientifically correct, cosme- 
tically perfect, established and conducted by 
American Hospital Nurses, unqualifiedly en- 
dorsed and used by Eminent Physicians. 

THE FRANCES FOX INSTITUTE 

For the Scientific Care of the Hair 

Sum 506 Crocker BmWio« Pnoae 5a (« 5 1 18 

At Vsrkrt 6t Port So.. S»n Francneo 



14 



San Francisco News Letter and 



^fatomohih 




WHEN one recalls that last September, 
after Henry Ford startled the indus- 
try by announcing in reduction 
ranging from $135 to $180 on his models, 
nearly twenty makes lowered their prices, 
one need not be surprised that more reduc- 
tions have not been made. From the stand- 
ard prices of less than a year ago, practical- 
ly thirty makes of cars are now selling at 
material reductions. That a very general re- 
duction all along the line will probably 
come before the close of the year is the 
opinion held by many leaders, but the pre- 
vailing impression is that such changes will 
come gradually and no radical tendency in 
this direction is looked for until after the 
close of the Summer selling season. 

These recent price changes reveal the fact 
that the motor car industry, like all other 
big business enterprises, is still going through 
its readjustment period, and a definite stabil- 
ity in all lines has not yet been' reached. 
There has been a gradual improvement in 
the automobile trade within the last two 
months. 



Auto Care in Summer 

During the Summer season motorists 
should give frequent attention to the radia- 
tor, advises a motor car manufacturer. It 
should always be kept filled, and at inter- 
vals it should be flushed out and filled with 
clean water. In connection with efficient 
operation of the cooling system, fan belt 
adjustment should be made, for the fan is 
needed in Summer. The position of the spark 
lever should be watched to see that it is kept 
in an advanced position, thus assuring better 
cooling of the motor. 

Minor parts, such as spring shackles, 
wheel bearings, steering connections and un- 
iversal joints, require oiling more often in 
Summer. It is wise to use a heavier grade 
of lubricating oil than in colder weather, 
and oil should be drained from the motor 
at intervals not to exceed every 1 ,000 miles. 



State Highway Improvement 

The United States Bureau of Public Roads 
has signed with the State Highway Commis- 
sion for the expenditure of the remaining 
money in the allotment of $2,896,071.77 giv- 
en to California under the 1921 allotment of 
Federal road moneys. The money will be 
spent on twenty-four State highway projects 
in California. 

All of the money available for California 
under the 1921 allowance is actually allot- 
ed to work under way or agreed upon. The 



money that will be available under the 1922 
budget will have been spent or agreed upon 
before June 30, 1922. 

Plans for the construction of the State 
highway between the Edison Power Station 
at the mouth of the Kern River Canyon and 
Bodfish are being pushed by the Highway 
Commission and active construction is plan- 
ned for the early Spring of 1922. 



What Auto Owners Like 

As the result of an inquiry sent to many 
motor car owners in all sections of the 
United States by the National Automobile 
Chamber of Commerce, J. C. Lang of that 
body, in an address at the recent meeting of 
the Associated Advertising Clubs of the 
World, held in Atlanta, said that endurance 
was the most popular consideration in selec- 
ting a car, economy second, comfort third, 
followed by price. Speed and distinctive re- 
finement seemed to arouse little interest. 

Returns from twenty States, covering more 
than thirty makes of cars, on the index basis 
of 100, gave the following to the different 
buying points: Endurance, 15; economy, 
14; comfort, 9Yi; price, 9J/2; appearance, 
8: service, 1Yi\ hill climbing, 7; flexibility, 
bYi; endorsement of others. 6J/2; specifica- 
tions, 6; speed, 5j/2; appointments, 5. 

"Buying points," said Mr. Long, "rather 
than selling points, _are the important con- 
siderations today. 

"Fifty-one per cent, of the voters said they 
were not interested in slogans. Twenty-three 
per cent, of the poll expressed an interest in 
specially featured parts, such as motors and 
springs; but 48 per cent, were not interested 
and 29 per cent, were non-committal. 

"The large farmer market, representing 
about 60 per cent, of automobile sales, and 
the widening uses of the motor car in busi- 
ness will doubtless continue to accentuate 
ability to 'stand up,' economy of operation, 
easy-riding qualities and price in relation to 
value as leading buying points." 



Loose Treads 

A loose tread is caused by water soaking 
into the fabric through tread cuts. A tire 
is bound to get cut now and then ; and if it 
runs over wet roads, water enters these cuts 
and follows around the fabric, which soaks 
it up like a blotter. Then the fabric can no 
longer hold the rubber tread on. 

To prevent it, keep out the water by seal- 
ing up the cuts. If they're big, have them 
vulcanized. If small, use Tire Putty. 



The Death Record 

In the United States, in 1919, there were 
approximately eighty thousand persons acci- 
dentally killed. Of this number, only twen- 
ty-two thousand were killed in industry. The 
remainder were killed on the streets and in 
the homes. Over ten thousand persons were 
killed as the result of automobile accidents. 
This is the largest number that can be attrib- 
uted to any one cause. Whether or not this 
death rate will continue to increase depends 
largely upon the efforts put forth by indivi- 
dual drivers to prevent automobile accidents. 
Trie day is coming when the law will require 
all persons to pass examinations proving that 
they are physically and mentally fit and have 
sufficient knowledge to drive an automobile 
safely. 



Overtaxed Motorists 

In collection with the recommendation of 
the Federal Treasury to increase taxes on the 
motor car industry it is well to remember 
that already the industry pays the Govern- 
ment about $151,000,000. In adition to this 
the industry and motor car owners pay to the 
various States and municipalities as registra- 
tion, license and personal property taxes 
$170X00,000, making more than $320,000.- 
000 collected as annual taxes from the manu- 
facture and use of motor vehicles. 



Jack Dempsey's Pedigree 

Although the .public has had about as 
much pugilistic history as it can stand, it may 
be excusable to say that Jack Dempsey 
claims the strain of Irish, Scotch and Indian 
blood in his veins. He has led a rugged, 
though careful, life in the open for the most 
part, a condition which has assisted mater- 
ially in molding his remarkable physique. 
His real name is William Harrison Dempsey. 
He was born June 24, 1895, at Manassa, 
Col. He is the sixth child in a family of 
eight. When Dempsey was but 7 years old 
his parents, Hiram and Celia Dempsey, 
moved with their children from Manassa to 
Montrose, Col. Here the family lived for 
nine years, and then traveled to Salt Lake 
City, Utah, which the champion and the rest 
of the household claim as their home town. 

The prefix "Jack" was assumed by the 
champion when he attained his majority 
and turned to the ring for a livelihood. He 
adopted the name of the famous "Nonpa- 
reil," Jack Dempsey of Brooklyn, on the the- 
ory that by assuming the former middle- 
weight champions name some of the glamour 
and distinction of the famous old fighter 
would revert to him. 



NOT SO FUNNY 

To the suggestion that the parade of An- 
ti-Volsteaders in New York was funny, 
Grand Marshall Warren S. Fisher replies: 
"It may be funny, but so was the Boston tea 
party. It is the spark that will set the prai- 
rie on fire. It is the beginning of a national 
organization that is prepared to fight to the 
limit sumptuary law organizations. 



California Advertiser for July 9, 1921 



15 



FUNERAL OF MRS. CHRISTESON 

Dean J. W. Gresham of Grace Pro-Cathe- 
dral officiated at the funeral services for 
Mrs. Andrew Christeson at Gray's Chapel on 
Wednesday morning. Mrs. Christeson was 
the wife of Andrew Christeson, vice-president 
of the American Railway Express Company, 
and died last Saturday morning. The fun- 
eral was delayed to permit the arrival of her 
sister Mrs. Charles Piez from New York. The 
pallbearers at Mrs. Christeson's funeral were 
Alfred Sutro, M. H. Robbins, F. J. Koster, 
F. L. Lipman, Frank King, B. F. Schless- 
inger, Charles Deering and Frank I. Turner. 
J. F. Baker of Los Angeles, E. M. Whittle 
of Seattle, and W. C. Kiefer, J. S. Westlake, 
C. R. Graham and L. 0. Head, all of San 
Francisco. 

POSITION WANTED 

Position of some importance calling for 
some experience in wholesale hardware, or 
steeli oil. minine. sugar, commission, stocks 
,111.1 bonds. Pay $150.00, J200.00 at outset. 
Until recently in army and navy war work. 
H. A. CAHOL.AN 
Holly Oak Hotel, Sausalito, Cal. 





"The House of Quality" 


GOLDEN GATE DAIRY LUNCH 

Block & McDonald, Props. 


Service 
Visit 


Supreme Home Cooking 
Prices Reasonable 
172 EDDY STREET 
them after the show and meal times 



BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old Poodle Dog 

Luncheon 75c 

Served Daily — 11 to 2 

Choose full-sized portions from large menu, 

which is changed every day. 

Excellent Food — Beautiful Environment 

Prompt Service 

French Dinner $1.50 

Including tax, week dnys and Sunday*. 5 to 9 P. M. 

DANCING 

421 BUSH ST.. ABOVE KEARNY 

Phone Douglas 2411 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. lo 9 p. m. 

Gus' Fashion 

The MOST POPULAR RESTAURANT 

65 Post Slreel, Near Market Street. 
Phone Kearny 4536 San Francisco, Calif. 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 
French and Italian Dinners. 

FISH AND CAME A SPECIALTY 



BLANCO'S 

Farroll and Larkin Sts. 
Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without 

dining in the finest cafe in America 
Luncheon (11:30 lo 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner $1.75 



DEATH OF PROMINENT MERCHANT 

The late James Athearn Folger, president 
of J. A. Folger & Company, who died on 
Tuesday at the Adler Sanitarium after an op- 
eration for appendicitis performed six weeks 
ago, was one of our best known and most 
respected citizens. He was a member of 
several local social organizations including 
the Bohemian Club; and was born in San 
Francisco fifty-eight years ago. He inherited 
the important business established by his 
father. Surviving him are his widow, Mrs. 
Clara F. L. Folger; two daughters, Mrs. 
Piatt Kent and Mrs. J. A. Donohue Jr.; two 
sons, J. A. Folger Jr., student at Yale, Peter 
Folger and a stepson, John Cunningham. 
I _ 



STATELY MAUSOLEUM 

The stately new mausoleum of the Cypress 
Lawn Cemetery Association is rapidly near- 
ing completion. This edifice, in which 
cleanliness and sanitation is surrounded with 
dignified environment, is described as "one 
of the most wonderful and beautiful struc- 
tures of its kind in existence." The mauso- 
leum will contain five hundred crypts, with 
tomb rooms, private sections, family sections 
and individual crypts. 



Friend — Do you believe in heredity? 
Father — Of course I do. Why, I've got three 
daughters and every one of them smokes. — 
New York Sun. 



The Crocker National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Condition at Close of Business, June 30, 1921 

RBSOl RCBS 

Loans and I liscounts 924,086,310*53 

U, S. Bonds and Certificates 4,429,036.60 

Other Bonds and Securities 147,852.50 

Capital stock in federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco 150,000.00 

Customers' Liability under Letters of Credit 673,140.28 

Cash and Sight Exchange 0,609,542.68 



$40,055,801.44 



LIABILITIES 

Capital * ...ooo.ooo.oo 

surplus and Undivided Profits «,l04,r,Ki>.Tr> 

Circulation 1,061,397.50 

Letters of Credit 710,486.10 

Deposits 211.270.4 16.00 



i VS, J. PAGAN, Vice-President 
W, GREGI :, ' i ' ld< nt 

J. B. MeCARi iAR. ' President 

«i i.l. 1AM W. CROCKER, Vlce-Pres. 

r <; WILLIS. Cashier 

(1. W. BBNER, A 

i : i). Dean, Assistant Cashier 

<;. PERIS 



OFFICERS 

\\ M H CROCKER, President 



£40,055,801.44 



.1. M, MASTER Assistant Cashier 
D, J. MURPHY, Assistant Cashier 

\ C. 1:1: \ 1 1, assists nt i !ashler 
W, i> LUX, a- shier 

i \ R( i \i is, Assistant Cashier 
II C. SIMPSON, Mgr. Foreign Dept. 
n ii HA1QHT, Asat. Mgr. Foreign Dept 
BALDWIN, Auditor 



IM> villi OF DIRECTORS 

\VM II CRl CKER ' ' i u , si'i ITT 

CHARLES T CRCCKER CHAS E GREEN 

i A.S I PAGAN W. GREGG 

\\ II.1.IAM W. CRl ICK I'.K 



A. P. MORRISON 
S. P. B. MORSE 
.1. B. Mi CA RGAR 



REPORT OF CONDITION OF 



THE ANGLO & LONDON PARIS NATIONAL BANK 

SAN FRANCISCO 

At the Close of Business, June 30, 1921. 
RBSOl R< BS 

Discounts L<4 >unts •87*807.178. it 

i s Bonds lo Secure Circulation ;•.,».->«, mm. im 

Other V, s !:..ni]s and CertI 7.<;:::t.i-i.*>4 

Other Bonds 1 0,470,600. <i 

Other i,ioi,i:iii.is 

Custom in.:t:!i. t iimhi 

Com mo a in Transit.. .1 ."..117.717.111 

and Slgrhl u», 173*080 .'2» 24J5SB,7ffO*Oa 



.<ii.-i.nr.**,i;i i.r.s 
ll MHLITIE9 

1 I SI OCk . . » B, 0O t»0 0.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 3*407^9*440 

:;.!ii:.-..i;ihi.o(i 
Letters ind Foreign imd | IO.SS4v4I2.OB 

ivernmcnt i.»i i.oon.iHt 

Other Llabll Itles 2JI74«428.I0 

its «;i;.iMir.,s(ii..-.it 



OFFICERS 

- dent 

i nt 
Ident 
Han j lent 

and Cashier 

.1 u ■ nt 

nt 



«»r..».%K,H4»-"." 



dent 
.1 W. Hi 

r and 

■ 

■ ,*T 

hier 
K .1 Hi 
V. R I 



16 



San Francisco News Letter and 




PL/EASURE/'S WAND 

"Obey no wand but pleasure's — Tom Moore. 




Orpheum 

This week's bill is breezy and refreshing 
to an unusual degree. "A Trip to Hitland" 
is delightful, consisting of the successful 
songs of se\eral of the famous song-writers 
of today. Their words and music are true 
indications of the lyrical taste of this gen- 
eration Jack Norton and Queenie Smith 
with their large company are giving Orphe- 
umites a second chance to see "Bubbles" 
and we were all glad of it. 



Alcazar 

For divers reasons we were eager to see 
how the favorites treated Cosmo Hamilton's 
"The Blindness of Virtue;" now we are de- 
cided to go again next week, and quite likely 
the week following. 



Columbia 

"Rip Van Winkle" is drawing large and 
interested audiences to Columbia. The revival 
has been a historic success, proving that ap- 
preciation of the good old things has not 
been entirely crowded out by the eager de- 
sire for new. Next week the management 
offer "Over the Hill." a photoplay made oul 
of Will Carlton's popular poem and said to 
be filled with human emotion and beautiful 
pictures. Mary Carr portrays the character 
of an aged mother and her New York ad- 
mirers send us word that it is a wonderful 
piece of acting. The play is a triumph of 
cinema skill, and in the cool spaciousness of 
the Columbia will serve to while away one of 
these sultry July evenings. 



Imperial 

Peter B. Kyne being a California writer, 
the plot being laid at home, the show-house 
within walking distance, we left the hearth 
and journeyed to see "The Ten Dollar 
Raise." Peter drew from home talent, 
doubtless, but the film producer overlooked 



SAtl FRA.MOSCO 




{ 



y "*®Mt>W«r, &\a ul\. , ; 



25 and 50c 



MATINEES 

DAILY 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 
Except Sats., Suns, and Holidays 

AND THE SAME GREAT SHOWS 



Smoking permitted in dress circle and 
loges. 



this detail and took the selection of cast and 
location seriously. 

Severi bolstered the bill with selections 
from the ever popular "Bohemian Girl," 
for which he should be thanked. 



California 

We believe that "Billions" is a misnomer, 
but are not sure. "The Globe Trotter" or 
"The Romance of a Lost Plot" might serve 
better, for both happened and we are not 
sure where we lost the plot or how we got 
there. Nazimova sparkles at times in this 
picture. Three times, to be accurate. 



Alcazar's Next Bill 

"Mamma's Affair" the Harvard prize play 
which was produced at the Little Theatre, 
New York, with an all-star aggregation of 
players and later was seen with the same 
company in this city has been chosen as the 
vehicle for the second week of the special 
engagement of Gladys George at the Alcazar 
beginning next Sunday afternoon. Miss 
George who is sweet and pretty will have a 
fascinating role. Dudley Ayres will have a 
strong part as a bachelor physician. 



Midgets to Reappear at Orpheum 

Singer's Midgets, act regarded the most 
interesting in existence and the possessor of 
many varied phases, is to appear at the Or- 
pheum next week in response to request of 
hundreds of Orpheum patrons who were un- 
able to obtain seats when the Midgets played 
here several weeks ago. 

Thousands of school children can avail 
themselves of this second opportunity. 
School was in session when the Midgets were 
last here. The act will contain every feature 
it possessed on its previous visit with the ad- 
dition of many new costumes, all of which 
are San Francisco made. 

The remainder of the Orpheum bill next 
week will also be up to the usual high stand- 
ard. "A Trip to Holland" and Chas. Bai- 
ry's act will be the only hold-overs. 



CARE OF HAIR, FACE, NAILS 

Efforts are being made to have the care 
of the face, hair and nails made part of a 
girl's education in the public schools. There 
will be a convention of hair dealers from all 
parts of the United States, held in Chicago 
on August 1st. The subject will be brought 
before them and recommended, it is said. 

Mrs. J. P. Cosgrove of 360 Geary St., 
who is a delegate to the convention and who 
has organized the California Hair Dealers 
Assocociation, reports the bay city members 
unanimous for the educational extension. 



MAKE YOUR CHANGES 

The Pacific Telephone and Telegraph 
Company notifies the public that the new 
Telephone Directory goes to press July 9. 
1921, and all changes in listing and adver- 
tising should be arranged for as soon as 
possible. No one can afford to have his 
listings out of date in the Telephone Direc- 
tory. 



Many travellers from East and West have 
been visiting San Francisco this week and 
the Fairmont has been receiving a large 
share of praise for its manifest advantages 
as the place to see the glorious panorama of 
our incomparable bay, picturesque moun- 
tains and sunsets. To visit San Francisco 
and not see what scenic beauty opens from 
ils doors is to miss one of the fine things 
in California. 



OUR SOLID SAVINGS BANKS 

The savings bank statements should be 
particularly comforting to San Franciscans 
these days when the rate of unemployment 
is temporarily unusual on account of wage 
readjustments. Every bank presents a satis- 
factory statement. The large institutions 
more than sustain the repute of our city for 
sound finance. 

The Hibernia Bank shows assets of $75.- 
995.334.10. the number of its depositors be- 
ing 78,982 and the average deposit $926.95. 



FINE SHOWING 

The Crocker Bank statement is one 
which reflects great credit on the manage- 
ment of the concern by its popular head and 
the clever staff he has gathered around him. 
Total resources are $40,055,891.44. of which 
the loans and discounts are $24;986,3 1 0.53 
pnd cash and sight exchange $9,669,542.63. 
United States bonds and certificates make up 
most of the balance. A very fine showing. 



Normandie Garage 

Gough and Sutter Sts. 



Washing and Polishing Day and Night. 

Cars Oiled and Greased. 

Crank Cases Drained Free. 

Home Garage Trade Solicited. 



Fillmore 4815 



California Advertiser for July 9, 1921 



17 



DIVIDEND NOTICES 

UNION TRUST COMPANY OF SAN FRAN- 
CISCO, Market street and Grant avenue 
— For the half year ending June 30, 
1921, a dividend has been declared at 
the rate of four (4) per cent per an- 
num on all savings deposits, payable on 
and after Friday, July 1, 1921. Divi- 
dends not called for are added to and 
bear the same rate of interest as the 
principal from July I, 1921. Money 
deposited on or before July 11, 1921, 
will earn interest from July 1, 1921. 
F. J. BRICKWEDEL, Cashier. 



ITALIAN-AMERICAN BANK, southeast cor. 

Montgomery and Sacramento Sts. ; 
North Beach branch, cor. Columbus av. 
and Broadway — For the half year end- 
ing June 30, 1921, a dividend has been 
declared at the rate of four (4) per 
cent per annum on all savings deposits 
payable on and after July I, 1921 ; di- 
vidends not called for will be added to 
the principal and bear the same rate of 
interest from July I, 1921; deposits 
made on or before July II. 1921, will 
earn interest from July I. 1921. 

A. SBARBORO. President 



HUMBOLDT SAVINGS BANK, 783 Market 

St., near Fourth. — For the half year 
ending June 30, 1921, a dividend has 
been declared at the rate of four (4) 
per cent per annum on all savings de- 
posits, payable on and after July I, 
1921 ; dividends not called for are add- 
ed to and bear the same rate of inter- 
»est as the principal from July I, 1921 ; 
deposits made on or before July I I . 
1921, will earn interest from July I. 

1921. 

H. C. KLEVESAHL. Cashier. 



SECURITY BANK AND TRUST CO 316 

Montgomery »t*eet. For the half-vpar 
pndina Tune 30. 1921. a dividend has 
been declared at the rale of four (4) 
per cent per annum on savings dennsits. 
n-vable on and after July I 1921. 
Dividends not called for are added lo 
and hear 1 Tie same rate of interest as ihe 
principal from luly I. 1921. Deposits 
made on or before luly II. 1921. will 
earn interest from lulv I. 1921. 
EDWARD D. OAKLEY. Secretary. 



THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS WD LOAN SO- 
CIETY, cor. Market. McAllister and 
Jones Sts. — For the half vcar ending 
June 30. 1921. a dixidend has been de- 
clared at the rate of four (4) per cent 
per annum on all deposits, payable on 
and after Friday. July I. 1 92 1: divi- 
dends not drawn will be added to de- 
positors' accounts, becoming a part 
thereof, and will cam dividends from 
July I. 1921 : deposits made on or be- 
fore July I. 1921. will draw interest 
from Julv I. 1921 

R. M. TOBIN. Secretary. 



IN THE DIVIDEND LIST 

In the list of San Francisco banks and 
trust companies, that have announced a div- 
idend of 4 per cent this year are: Anglo Cali- 
fornia Trust Company; Federal Trust Com- 
pany; Humboldt Savings Bank; Security 
Savings Bank and Trust Company; Hibernia 
Savings and Loan Society; Union Trust 
Company of San Francisco; Italian Amer- 
ican Bank; Bank of Italy. 



A CREDIT TO SAN FRANCISCO 

The Anglo and London Paris National 
Bank lenders an impressive statement of the 
conditions of business up to June 30. Re- 
sources $95,958,644.58; surplus and undi- 
vided profits $3,407,399.69; cash and sight 
exchange $19,472,039.20. Mr. Herbert 
Fleishhacker and his fellow bank officers are 
a credit to our city. 



Gold imports into the United States in the 
fiscal year just ended aggregate in round 
terms $650,000 000 or more than in any 
year except 1917, when they aggregated 
$977,000,000. 



To shed light on the freight question 

which is worrying producers it should be 
stated that in a letter to Southern Pacific 
Stockholders, Julius Kiuttschnitt tells them 
no general reduction of freights can be ex- 
pected at this lime. 



The Chronicle points out that the real 

line of expansion for San Francisco is south, 
towards San Mateo. It might be added that 
ns now as far as Mayfield are within 
two minutes rail lime of one another. 



Boom talk about extending Van Ness 

Avenue lo Howard is absurd. The auto 
trade now has more room than il wants on 
ihe Avenue. What would be beneficial 
would be a branch in the Twin Peaks Tun- 
nel to carry people to Sunset which is failing 
(or sufficient Iransnortalion. 



Alfred J. Hill is now ihe State Chairman 
of the National Association of Fire L'nder- 
wrilers. He is California manager for the 
State Life Insurance Company of Indiana. 



DIVIDEND NOTICES 

ANGLO-CALIFORNIA TRUST COMPANY 

(Savings Department) — Main Bank, 
Market and Sansome streets; branches, 
101 Market street, Sixteenth and Mis- 
sion streets. Fillmore and Geary streets, 
Third and Twentieth streets. For the 
half-year ending June 30, 1921, a divi- 
dend has been declared at the rate of 
four (4) per cent per annum on all de- 
posits, payable on and after Friday, 
July I, 1921. Dividends not called for 
are added to and bear the same rate of 
interest as the principal from July I, 
1921. Deposits made on or before July 
I I, 1921, will earn interest from July I, 



1921 



LOUIS SUTTER, 

Vice-President and Cashier. 



FIRST FEDERAL TRUST COMPANY, cor. 

Montgomery and Post Sts. — For the 
half year ending June 30, 1921, a divi- 
dend has been declared at the rate of 
fcur (4) per cent per annum on all 
savings deposits, payable on and after 
July I, 1921; dividends not called for 
are added to the deposit account and 
earn dividends from July I, 1921; de- 
posits made on or before July II, 1921 , 
will earn interest from July I. 1921. 
JAMES K. MOFFITT, Cashier. 



BANK OF ITALY, junction Market, Powell 
and Eddy sts. ; Montgomery st. branch 
southeast corner Montgomery and Clay 
sts.; Market st. branch, junction Mar- 
ket. Mason and Turk sts. — For the half 
year ending June 30, 1921, a dividend 
has been declared at the rate of four 
(4) per cent per annum on all savings 
deposits, payable on and after Friday, 
July I. 1921; dividends not called for 
are added to and bear the same rate of 
interest as the principal from July I. 
1921 : deposits made on or before July 
II. 1921. will earn interest from July I. 
1921. 

A. P. GIANNINI. President. 



Spend Your Vacation 

IN THE 

Beautiful Feather River Country 

r II I THI I.I- VI i 

TBI SEA IN rfl 

Reached Wa 

WESTERN PACIFIC RAILROAD 

"The Feather River Route" 

—Numerous Res. is along the famous FEATHLR RIVER and near the many 
lakes and screams where fish and came are abundant. 

mm fn« ILLUSTXATED FOLMKS 



Tick" Office, 50 POST STREET and FERRY BUILDING-Telephone Sutter 1651 



18 




HISTORIC ENGLISH 

The late James C. Fernald, L. H. D.. au- 
thor of various important works on the En- 
glish language has left as a legacy to his 
countrymen the work entitled "Historic En- 
glish." which is now published by the Funk. 
Wagnalls Company of New York and Lon- 
don, whom he assisted in preparing their 
standard dictionary. 

Dr. Fernald's idea was that the English 
language originated as the language of the 
common people and grew and developed as 
their thought, life and power increased. In 
his "Historic English" the history of the 
language is traced from its origin down to 
the present time. To exacting students of 
good English the new work cannot fail to 
be a welcome volume. Written by a man 
who combined an amazing versatility of 
mind the book is marked by a discrimina- 
tion seldom if ever excelled. It should find 
a place in every private library. 



LIONEL JOSEPHARE'S DRAMA 

Lionel Josephare, whom San Francisco 
has expected to make a name for himself in 
the literary world, has printed a new drama 
in verse, which if it have any fault, is that 
the poet has shot over the mark of public 
appreciation. When a couple of second-rate 
sluggers are receiving half a million of dol- 
lars for about half-an-hour's exercise with 
big gloves, and no fear of damage to their 
mugs, the skies must be dark for a true 
poet. Josephare is not only a poet but a 
versatile writer of prose, who would have 
reaped rewards in the literary world had he 
the tough hide necessary for the scramble 
amongst pretenders in all lines of art. So 
"Christopher" is a five-act play on which 
the author has been some time at work. He 
is not a slow writer, but a conscientious one 
and whatever he attempts is certain to reach 
a high standard. It is to be hoped that his 
drama may receive the public verdict which 
a gifted writer who aims at excellence de- 
serves. The book of the play now privately 
circulated will not be placed on sale. 



"THE SAMOVAR GIRL" 

This story by Frederick Moore is another 
of the Siberian novels in that style of fiction 
he excels. The field is a new one and Mr. 
Moore k. familial with it. The narrative is 
dramatic. To Silieria returns Peter Gordon, 
who since boyh'/od has been in America. 
His purpose in returning to the land of his 
birth is to have revenge for wrongs, the re- 
membrance of which has burned in him de- 
spite his years of absence. Back in Siberia 
he finds the hum of the samovar in every 
house, the wintry music of sleighbells, the 



Cossacks with their high wool caps, the frost 
creeping up the window panes till the outer 
world is blotted out. Peter feels the spell 
of Russia. He pursues his quest for revenge 
in chapters full of absorbing adventures, but 
soon there is a new force compelling him. 
For one day his samovar is brought to him. 
not by the slatternly Inn servant, but by a 
girl, whose beautiful face and slim figure 
have aristocratic distinction. And though he 
does not know it, she is the daughter of the 
man he has come to slay.. 

The author has made the most of this 
tense situation. D. Appleton and Company 
of New York are the publishers. 



BEECHER WAS BITTER 

Qeeer are the pranks of Father Time. 
Gustavus Myer's book, "Ye Olden Blue 
Laws," published by the Century, New York, 
refers to the famous sermon of Henry Ward 
Beecher on stage people, in which he said 
among other things: 

"How many hundred actresses are there 
who dare not venture within modest society? 
How many thousand wretches are there 
whose acting is but the means of sensual in- 
dulgence? In the support of gamblers, cir- 
cus riders, actors and racing jockeys a 
Christian end industrious people are guilty 
of supporting mere mischief-makers — men 
whose very heart is diseased and whose sores 
exhale contagion to all around them. We 
pay moral assassins to stab the purity of our 
children." 

The famous preacher's granddaughter is 
now supervising the production of "Sunshine 
Harbor," in which she is to appear as the 
star. 



Officer (drilling recruits) — Hey, you, in 
case of fire, what do you do? Recruit — I 
yell. Officer— Yell what? Recruit — Why. 
what do you suppose? Cease firing. — Paris 
Le Rire. 

"To think that acting should ever come to 
this!" "To what?" "Just now I heard a 
blooming moving-picture star refer to the 
stage as 'the speakies.' " — Youngstown Tel- 
egram. 




N W CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



For thai stubborn cough 
Use Old Snake Doctor's Cough Remedy 

SNAKE DRUG CO. 

Formerly G. Leipnilz & Co. 

Now Located at 

127-129 KEARNY ST. 



FACIAL DEFECTS 
Crooked Noses, Lines of Age, Etc. 

(Facial Reconstruction) 

H. EARLE COGER, A. M. 

797 Bush Si. Office Hours I to 4 

San Francisco Phone Suiter 3617 



San Francisco Law School 

Third Fluor Call Building 

E-uenin^ Sessions for Men fi? Women, 7:30 to 9: 10 

Applications tor enrollment iii« being received now 

Classi - c n>' Monday. September 12, 1921 

Write Today For I'jiialogue 



PBNIS6ULAR l'ATKOXAGK SOLICIT K ]> 



POST-TAYLOR GARAGE, Inc. 

530 TAYLOR ST. 

Washing and Greasing Cars 
in a careful and efficient manner 



THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 

STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and at LONDON. ENG. : NEW YORK: 

PORTLAND. ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE. 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE. Manager W. J. COULTHARD. Assistant Manager 



Statement of the Condition and Value of the 
Assets and Liabilities of 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND 
LOAN SOCIETY 

HIBERNIA BANK 
Dated San Francisco, June 30, 1921 

ASSETS 
1 — Bonds of the United States (16.647,000.00). of the State of California and the Cities 
and Counties thereof ($12,640,175.00), of the State of New York ($2,149,000.00), 
of the City of New York ($1,000,00000), of the State of Massachusetts ($1,162.- 
000.00), of the County of Bergen, New Jersey ($200,000,001, of the County of 
Cuyahoga, Ohio ($69,000.00), of the City of Chicago ($643,000.00), of the City of 
Cleveland ($100,000.00). of the City of Albany ($200,000.00), of the City of St. 
Paul ($100,000.00), of the City of Philadelphia ($350,000.00). of the City of San 
Antonio, Texas ($72,000.00), the actual value of which is $34,161,737.78 

2 — Miscellaneous Bonds comprising Steam Railway Bonds ($1,951,600.00), Street Rail- 
way Bonds ($1,188,000.00). Quasi-Public Corporation Bonds ($2,632,000.00), the 
actual value of which is 5,230,515.30 

3— Cash on Hand 2,900,999.50 

4 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, the actual value of which is 31,424,902.32 

Said Promissory Notes are all existing Contracts owned by said Corporation, 
and the payment thereof is secured by First .Mortgages on Real Estate within 
this State and the States Of Oregon, Nevada and Washington 

5 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured the actual value of which is 461,446.04 

Said Promissory Notes ;ne all existing Contracts owned by said Corporation, 
and are payable to it at its office, and t h^ payment thereof is secured by pledge 
of Bonds and other securities. 

6— (a) Real Etate situate in the City and County 0( San Francisco ($678,312.82), and 
in the Counties of Alameda ($26,037.06), S:m Mateo ($28,122.37), Los Angeles 
($70,677.63), and ('.intra Costa ($33,089.26), in this Stat.-, the actual value of 
which is 836.239.13 

(b) The Land and Building is which said Corporation keeps ils said office, the 

actual valur of which is 979.514.03 

TOTAL ASSETS ■ $75,995,354.10 

LIABILITIES 
1 — Said Corporation owes Deposits amounting to and the actual value ol which is $73,212,916.18 

Number of Depositors 78.982 

Average Deposit $926.95 

2— Reserve Fund, Actual Value 2.782,437.92 

TOTAL LIABILITIES $75,995,354.10 



THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 

By e J tobin. President 
THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 
By R M TOBIN, Secretary 
STATIC OF CALIFORNIA, 
City and County ol San Franclsci 

K .1 TOBIN and R M TOBIN, being each duly sworn, each for him- That said E J TOBIN is 

dent and that said R M TOBIN is Secretary of the HIBERVIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, the Corporation 
above mentioned, and that the foregoing statement is true. E •' tobin. President. 

R M tobin. Secretary. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 1st day of lily. 1021 

(HAS T STANLEY. 
Notary Public in and for the Cit and County of Sin Fnu tte of California 




KEATON TIRE 
& RUBBER CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND LOS ANGELES SEATTLE PORTLAND 



Established July 20 1856 







PRICE 10 CENTS 



SATURDAY, JULY 16, 1921 



AND 

Cflaltforttta A&uprttBn- 

$5.00 PER YEAR 




The natural simplicity of CREX grass 
rugs, combined with their artistic beauty, 
imparts an atmosphere of refinement and 
good taste. They are the logical, inexpen- 
sive floor covering for any room in town or 
country. 

be C d R eSved a bv1' n u,a a .!onr ad ? 'V"" T"* ^"'l H «™« b « Be and ,nl P erial '" » ** divergence of colors and sizes. Don't 
oe deceived by imitations. Insist upon the genuine — they II sat sfy. 




, Cg A S S R U C, 

TRADE MARK RCC. US PAT OFF 



Their adaptability and practicability foi 
use the year 'round is best evidenced by the 
increasing demand in all seasons. For living 
room, dining room, bedroom, sun-parlor and 
porch, you will find them ideal. 



Handsomely Illustrated Color Catalog with full -Description Mailed on %equest 

CREX CARPET CO., 212 Fifth Ave., New York 



INSIST OM SCINO SHOWN THE GENUINE 



THE IDEAL FLOOR COV- 
ERING IN TOWN ANO 
COUNTRY ALL YEAR ROUND 



BIHQlMC 



Spend Your Vacation 

IN THE 

Beautiful Feather River Country 

T HO US A NHS OF FEI'T A BOVETH F. LEVEL OK 
THE SEA IN THE HE MiT (IF THE SIEKKAS 

WESTERN PACIFIC RAILROAD 

"The Feather River Route" 

— Numerous Resorts along the famous FEATHER RIVER and near the many 
lakes and streams where fish and game are abundant. 

WHITE FOR ILLUSTRATED FOLDERS 

ticket Offices: 50 POST STREET and FERRY BUILDING-Telephone Sutter 1651 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



The Largest Fire Insurance Company in America. 

FIRE AUTOMOBILE WINDSTORM 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



REASONABLE RATES 




J. B. CROWE 

3652 GEARY, at 1st Ave. 1055 Post St., at Polk 

PHONE FRANKLIN 7445 

automobile ri | All Kinds GLAZ,NG 

building VJiass vi rill lYiiius beveling 



>«*S>«*e*S*S*5*8KS*e"S*S>«>«><8Ks><Sx8*S>«^^ 



i>an JFranriBio QJltrmttrlg 









Leading Newsp 


aper of th 


e Pac 


fie Coast 








A 


N 


ewspaper 


made 


every 


da 


y 








TO 


SPEAK 


TO 










Ever 


y 


member of 


every 


f ami! 


y 



Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, deliveied for $1.15 a 

month - including Sunday editions. 
Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postmaster. 



Jluto 
Camp 
Comfort 
Outfit 




Makes Camping a Pleasure— Picnicing a Dream — Tin- Overland Trip an Ideal Outing. 

Practical, strong and Comuaut — The Lightest Outfit <<n the market — specially con- 
structed, reinforced, non-saline- rl . , u l . ] . ■ bed for two people, weighs only 'i~ pounds. 

.ii'ST THINK — A Chair, Table, s.-tt<-.- and Cot, Ml in one, combined with ;i col- 
lapsible Auto Tent, which can be furnished in anj desired combination to accommodate 
from one to six people. 

ManuM,ur C Jt.y TH RF.F. l.F.AF COT M ANIIFArniRTNC ftl, .S..nnyv a lp, f a lifnm, a 



PYR0-V01D 

Dr. Hoagland's Home Treatment 
- for - 

PYORRHEA 

Package with full directions sent 
in plain wrapper for One Dollar 

Satisfaction Guaranteed or Money Refunded 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

Dental Specialist 

908 Market treet, at Powell 

an Francisco 

Dept. N. L. Established 1903 

SAVE YOUR TEETH 



An Ounce of Prevention is 
Worth Many Pounds of 
Ten - mile - from - no- 
where - regret. 

Let our expert automobile electricians 
inspect your starting, lighting and 
ignition systems regularly. It's the best 
insurance against a breakdown at an 
important moment. 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 

SMASTER ^AUTOMOBILE ELECTRICIANS 
955 Post Street SAN FRANCISCO 



USE 

Associated Products 

"More Miles to the Gallon" 



% 

Associated Oil Company 



Sharon Bldg. 



San Francisco 



"We Stand for the Best in Business Training 



Munson 




School 



..for.. 

Private Secretaries 

600 SUTTER ST. FRANKLIN 306 

- ii I for Cutnlug 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20. 1856. 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. XCIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JULY 16, 1921 



No. 29 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA 
ADVERTISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. 
Frederick Marriott. 259 Minna Street, near Fourth, San Francisco, Cal. Tele- 
phone Kearny 720. Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post Office as second 
class mail matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year, $5.00. Foreign: One 
year $6.00; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The Nevts Letter does not solicit fiction and Ivill not be 
responsible for the return of ant; unsolicited manuscripts. 



-Our great President is bringing peace to the world. All hail ! 



The anti-Volstead parade in New York was a great success, but 

telegrams said not. Is Prohibition censoring the press service? 

If the Sinn-Feiners aren't satisfied with Dominion home rule, 

how would Andy Gallagher as King of Munster suit them? 
# * * 

The truce in Ireland seems to mean that the rival religionists in 

Belfast shall murder one another with increased gusto. What a com- 
mentary on Christian fanaticism! 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

Not that we are knocking the bridge over the bay, but is the 

natural growth of San Francisco towards Alameda or down the pen- 
insula towards San Mateo? 

Does Congress realize that there will be another election before 

long? Looks like a good year to run in a Volstead representative's 
district. 

"Brolaski now eager to go to U. S. prison," say the newspapets. 

Whv he hasn't been there for years past, is one of the black marks 

against American justice. 

¥ * ¥ 

-Exrminer is whooping up the free market. San Francisco wo- 



dissatisfied matron who resides in Washington, D. C, while her hub- 
by is in France. Are the rights of our women citizens to be cur- 
tailed by such antiquated technicalities? 

* * * 

Forbes, the financial writer, declares that John D. Rockefeller is 

the most interesting big man in America. Would he have the same 
opinion if the 82-year-old oil magnate was around borrowing his 
next month's rent? 

"I've just shot my husband. Here's my revolver," said a muni- 
cipal gardener's wife, tossing the weapon on the desk at the police 
station. Soon the shooters will not take even that trouble. They 
will send the pistols by messenger or parcel post. 

It needed a murder to make public the fact that a special police- 
man in San Francisco was also drawing salary as municipal garden- 
er. If all our double-salaried employes lost their lives, the municipal 
service would have to stop and recruit. 

v * * 

It doesn't seem to have occurred to the police that the union 

man who was found dead in the Park might have been a victim of 
the present labor troubles. Strike breakers have been hit on the 
head with gas pipe before this. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

Can't we have a public celebration of an anniversary in San 

Francisco without an alarm of fire every five minutes? On the 
Seventy-fifth Anniversary fires broke out all day. Whose oratory 
did the damage? 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

"I will never fight a colored man," remarks Mr. John Dempsey, 

shielding his valuable championship from pollution, as carefully as 
a setting hen on a nest egg. But in the same breath, he boasts he 
is ready to meet the big white slob. Willard, and whip him. Fine 
are the ethical distinctions of fisticuffs. 



men don't want to go shopping to save nickels. Ring up the 'phone 

and order is their style. 

* * * 

-Annie Laurie says the old-fashioned woman, who cares what 

her husband has to eat. isn't dead. Annie must be in a class with 

Einstein in finding out wonders. 

* ¥ ¥ 

The June building permits in San Francisco were $950,965. In 

Los Angeles the June permits were $6,269,546. In June last year 
Los Angeles beat us over four-and-a-half millions. Open Shop. 

• * • 

Naturally people are being assaulted with clubs and pieces of 

gas-pipe in Golden Gate Park, when murderous crooks receive more 
hero-worship, and sympathy, from Bolshevist newspapers than 
honest citizens. 

* * * 

Dr. P. S. Haley, lectured at the College of Physicians and Stir- 
peons, advances the theory that "energv" can be photographed. No 
doubt of it. Doc. The kind of energy that enables a man to get on 
the public pay roll for ladling out pseudo-scientific guff. 

• • • 

Judge Mogan of San Francisco refuses to grant a divorce to a 



The absentee newspaper proprietor of San Francisco is very 

angry because the Appellate Court of the District of Columbia de- 
clared the Soviet Government is "based upon wholesale assassina- 
tion and arson and the overthrow of morality." William wants & 
new U. S. Constitution. What he'll get is a new country if he isn't 
careful. Deportation is growing popular. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

Rev. D. Y. Donaldson, prohibition director at Porto Rico, has 

lost hope of strangling the Demon Rum. The bootleggers of Porto 
Rico are swifter on the job than the Prohibitionists. When will 
Uncle Sam get sense and dispense to Americans genuine liquor, and 
collect duty on it. instead of letting an army of bootleggers go on 

poisoning the population? 

* * * 

It is a fact seldom faced by labor leaders, that wherever labor 

is most plentiful civilization is lowest, as for example, in Siberia 
and in China. This fact helps to prove that capitalism is the only 
svstem which will provide the lowest under-dog with the very things 
h.» falsely believes he will obtain through socialism. Capitalism is 
constructive, and socialism is destructive. 



San Francisco News Letter and 



©IToMAL, 




As a result of the agitation against landlords 
One for the Landlord in New York, tenants have been refusing 
to pay rents, month after month, thus tan- 
talizing the owners. Nearly all the municipal courts have stood in 
with the tenants, so as to make political capital. 

At last the Supreme Court has put a stop to the proceeding by 
deciding favorably to a Taxpayers' Association a typical case. A 
tenant who was sued for non-payment, when ordered to vacate de- 
posited his rent, $10.50, but refused to put up the $3 court costs, 
incurred by the landlord. No claim was made by the tenant that 
the rent was excessive or objectionable. 

The justice of the Municipal court denied the motion of the land- 
lord to compel the clerk to tax for legal disbursement incurred in 
bringing summary ejectment proceedings. 

The taxpayers' association appealed the case to the Supreme 
Court, and that body has decided that the landlord is entitled to 
his legal disbursements and the municipal courts have no discretion 
in the matter. That question was decided in New York seventeen 

years ago and never reversed, said the Supreme Court. 

* * * 

The owners of railroad 
Owners of Railroad Securities Organizing in the United States are 

organizing to save 
themselves from the attacks of demagogues as well as financial pi- 
rates. There exists much ignorance with regard to the real owners 
of our railroads. Radical politicians refer to those corporations as 
if they were a combination of plutocrats with as little connection 
with our everyday world as if they resided on the planet Mars. 

The Association of Owners of Railroad Securities is already or- 
ganized in 500 cities. It represents 90 per cent of the savings banks 
and the mutual insurance companies. One-sixth of all savings bank 
funds, or more than $1,000,000,000, is invested in rail bonds. The 
insurance companies have more than $2,000,000,000 in rail bonds 
and stocks. 

The security holders appear to be gaining strength every day. 
The association is organized in 500 cities. It represents 90 per cent 
of the savings banks and the mutual insurance companies. The share 
of these institutions in railway ownership may be understood from 
the fact that one-sixth af all savings bank funds, or more than $1.- 
000,000,000, is invested in rail bonds. The investment of banks, 
trust companies and security companies reaches almost 
$2,500,000,000, so that this group of institutions holds a c on- 
siderable percentage of the $20,000,000,000 outstanding 
rail securities. This does not include the trust estates. Additional 
investors in stocks, bonds and other railroad obligations who are af- 
filiated with the Security Owners' Association, including trust ?nd 
other forms of estate holdings, surety, fire and marine companies, 
private investors, colleges and schools, brings its total representation 
uo to more than $11,000,000,000 of all classes of rail securities. 
The association stands for a tighter rein on the issuance of such se- 
curities. The power of supervision over securities only recently has 
been given to the Interstate Commerce Commission, and the invest- 
ors believe that body has made progress in correcting past evils, but 
they also hold that much yet remains to be done. 

It should establish a new viewpoint that of the 50,000,000 Am- 
ericans who are the joint owners in the railroads that radical politici- 
ans desire to make pawns in their game of chess. 

* * * 

Not that we wish the trade to go back to the old 
Lest We Forget days of low wages and long hours, but that the 

young printers of today may profit by comparison 
of their condition with that of their fathers and grandfathers, we 



wish them to read this scrap of information from the London Daily 
Mail about Sir Joynton Smith of Sydney, who was a major during 
the war. He is now 65 and wealthy. 

He learned the printing trade in London. Telling a Daily Mail 
reporter about it, he said: 

"From Hackney Road I used to walk to work, first as a boy at 
Waterlow's, the printers, and later at Meads, of Cheapside. Work 
was from 8 a. m. to 8 p. m., and my salary was 2s. 6d. (60 cents) 
a week. If you were a minute late in the morning you were locked 
out for a time and a proportionate amount of money docked from 
your 'salary.' 

"But my father in his young days worked even harder. He was a 
brass founder and his hours were from 6 a. m. to 8 p. m., and he 
had to walk about five miles to his work." 

There was no talk in those days of 44 hours a week with 48 
hours pay. 

The late George K. Fitch, proprietor of the San Francisco Bulle- 
tin, was a printer in New Orleans after our Civil War and worked 
ten hours a day for $10 a week. He used to tell how the cost of liv- 
ing was so moderate he saved $5 a week out of his small pay. 

Do the young printers of today and other craftsmen appreciate 
how fortunate they are as compared with the journeymen of a gen- 
eration back? 

The Zionist problem in Palestine is proving dif- 
Bad for Zionism ficult and the English newspapers are discussing 
it as if Sir Herbert Samuel's administration has 
not been altogether the success wished for. 

To an outsider it looks as if there has been too much sentiment 
and too little sound sense in the proposition to reinstate the Jewish 
peonle in their historic old land. In fact, it might not be too much 
to substitute the word "politics" for sentiment. 

The Jews being a clever people and a powerful people, it is to 
nnliticians an attractive scheme to restore Palestine to its ancient 
Hebraic distinction, if it would not interfere with other schemes. 

But the awkward fact is presented that Palestine is a poor land 
?nd the belligerant Arabs think an immigration of lews will fore:' 
them out. The Moslem population far outnumbers both Jews and 
Christians and alreadv there has been a conflict of the sects at Jaffa 
which has caused Mr. Herbert Samuel to prohibit further Jewish 
immigration. 

Of course the British could exert pressure to aid the Zionist move- 
ment, but that would bring them into conflict with the Moslem world, 
winch is the last thing thev desire. The British Empire is largely a 
Moslem power. India and Turkey are of more importance to the 
British Empire than a Zionist success in Jerusalem. About all that 
the British can promise is that both Arabs and Zionists will be guar- 
anteed "their individual riehts." That practicallv means little more 
than the sporting phrase, "fight it out and may the best man win." 
In order to keep the Moslem population in good feeling the British 
Empire now pays large subsidies to various tribes. One unruly clan 
of Arabs draws down $300,000 a year to keep from stirring up 
trouble. 

* * * 

The Frenzj of Freedom 

Who could blame that young man of New York's Four Hundred 
who set a heavy telephone wire drum rolling down the steepest hill 
in the Montmarte district of Paris. To be precise. Sigourney Thayer 
is his name and he is a nephew of Mrs. Van Rensselaer Thayer, whose 
name would indicate metropolitan exclusiveness to the last degree. 
No man, just escaped from the grasp of Mr. Volstead to the free 
commune of Montmarte, where obliging waiters stand around six 
deep in front of every cafe, awaiting the nod of thirsty Americans, 
is to be trusted. That he might climb a telegraph pole, or roll a 
telephone drum down a hill is to be expected. Our summer vaca- 
tionists are hitting the high spots in all places. Here on the Pacific 
Coast the trains and steamers cannot furnish accommodations for 
the San Franciscans headed for British Columbia and first-class 
Scotch at $5 a quart. While Uncle Sam is grudgingly parting with 
millions to keep his family at home bone dry. they are escaping over 
the boundaries and the oceans and helping the foreigners to pay off 
their national debts. It is an amusing spectacle — if you happen not 
to be a taxpayer. 



California Advertiser for July 16, 1921 

The British forces in Mesopotamia having to be re- 
War Is Hell duced. Mr. Churchill has told the House of Commons 

that 30,000 horses must be destroyed. 
The condemned animals have been "eating their heads off" and 
the horse market is such that it would not pay to transport the un- 
fortunate animals to Europe or India. The lowest bid on transport- 
ing a minimum of 10,000 horses was $125 a head. Then there 
would be expenses of marketing them. So the War office simplifies 
the .problem by killing the animals. Such is the waste of war. It 

is indeed "hell" as Sherman said. 

* * * 

As San Francisco has not kept pace with 
Open Shop Our Salvation Los Angeles, but has receded to second 
place in population, we should learn why. 
There isn't much trouble to discover the reason. Los Angeles for 
years has been able to undersell us. We cannot compete with Los 
Angeles in labor. The Closed Shop in San Francisco is too heavy 
a handicap. It is not so much the wages we pav as the fact that 
employers are not the masters of their business. The union business 
agent and strike promoter is the real master. 

Why discuss this condition further? It is a condition and not a 
theory San Franciscans, who would prefer to live here, have been 
compelled to move to Los Angeles where they ran fill San Francisco 
orders and deliver them here, at figures impossible to our local firms 
Mechanics leave here and eo to Los Angeles, because there thev will 
not be beaten or murdered for working in an Onen Shop. Union 
hands desert San Francisco for Los Aneeles and accept reduced 
wages which their leaders will not permit them to accept in San 
Francisco. . , . 

Summing uo the labor conditions, as presented in the two large 
cities of California, we find that S»n Francisco has no future but to 
remain a bad second to I n 8 Aneeles if it continues to do i's work 
under the Closed Shop while the other city pholds the Onen Shop^ 

Most neonle. here, do not realize how much Los Aneeles has 
benefited bv the Open Shoo Thirtv years ago. Los Angles was a 
village with such an insianificant representation in the State I eeis- 
lature that its courtly Senator Del Valle. a native Cahfornian of line 
oratorical talent, was accustomed to ask political favors of the large 
San Francisco delegation, much as a noor relative would entreat a 
proud maenate worth his millions Now the political centre has 
shifted to the Spanish village, which sent Senator Del Valle to the 
Legislature, and San Francisco is becoming the political Dives who 
has to be thankful for the crumbs falling from the rich man s tablp. 
Los Aneeles is one of the few places in the United S'ates which 
has no buiMine crisis. It has become entitled to several more law- 
makers while San Francisco loses several. It has convinced the 
United States it is the hub of population in California and will soon 
become the centre of industry and commerce. San Francisco for- 
merly left Los Angeles far behind in the matter of bank clearing, 
but our Southern competitor is slowly but surely reducing its dis- 
crepency. How long will Los Angeles take to overhaul us if we al- 
low the millstone which has dragged us down for thirty years to re- 
main tied to our necks? Just as surely as we have retrograded to 
second place in the last twenty years, we will recede to third if we 
remain quiescent slaves of a labor trust and neglect our once splendid 
opportunities. ... ., 

Right now. Los Angeles is meditating the most important coup it 
has ever planned— the development of a great hydro-electric system, 
which will enable it to become the Pacific Coast centre of industry. 
It has flooded the East with circulars to create the impression that its 
even climate and abundance of electric energy for manufacturing 
will place it far beyond the possibility of competition by other Paci- 
fic Coast communities. Who can doubt that the industrial effort will 
be made, and with the characteristic aggressiveness of our Southern 
California hustlers. 

Los Angeles now has in addition to the Open Shop the system 
of graded wages which accord to the sunenor workman superior 
wages The union plan which dominates San Francisco entitles an 
inefficient loafer with a union card to the same wage as the most ex- 
pert workman. 

The opportunity offers now for the business men of San rran- 
cisco to strike off the shackles of labor tyranny, that have retarded 
the advancement of our fine city for thirty years. When the Open 
Shop has made Los Angeles the largest city in California, and has 



placed Detroit far ahead of all manufacturing towns in its region, it 
can be no dangerous experiment for San Francisco to substitute the 
Open Shop for the Closed Shop. The latter is the fortress of industrial 
sloth, unfairness and revolution. It is an unfailing symptom of unrest, 
civic decay and commercial stagnation. Schemes like the bridge to 
Oakland are very paltry indeed compared with the question, shall 
we condemn our city to failure by yielding to the domination of 
union business agents or revive its energies and hopes by demanding 
American industrial freedom and the Open Shop? 

That the Open Shop promotes industrial 
Freedom Above Wages contentment and efficiency, is the opinion of 
a San Francisco employer who has a forg- 
ing shop in the vicinity of Howard and First streets. Requiring a 
foreman, and being unable to obtain a desirable man here, he ex- 
tended his search to Los Angeles, where he found one. But to his 
surprise the man refused an offer of a dollar a day more than he was 
receiving, and the prospect of having to work an hour a day less in 
San Francisco, had no appeal to him. 

"I have a nice bungalow here and could get nothing like it for 
the same money," he answered the employer. "It would not pay me 
to break up my home and go to work with you. Here in Los An- 
geles. I do not have to belong to the union, and that saves me dues 
and assessments and keeps me out of strikes. A dollar a day. extra, 
would not pav me to work in San Francisco under the union rules, 
and I care nothine for the hour a day less." 

"Still," areued the San Francisco employer, "it would he better 
for von to be in a city where there are more opportunities." 

"There are mnrp opportunities here," replied the mechanic. "1 
am satisfied I could find three positions in Los Aneeles to the one I 
could find in San Francisco should I leave your employ. No it would 
not be a sensible thing for me to get out of this Open Shop citv, 
and eo to San Francisco — not if you offered me two dolars a day 
more." 

"I'll give you two dollars a day more," declared the employer, 
but the offer was declined. 

This is no fiction, but an actual fact, and is most instructive. In 
the first place, it is sienificant that the employer could not find a 
satisfactory foreman in San Francisco and had to search in Los An- 
geles. Next, is the interesting fact that having found a prospective 
foreman in Los Aneeles. the man would not accept two dollars more 
" dav with an hour's le^s work. Freedom from unionism and the 
Hosed Shop in I os Angles meant more than he would gain in 
waees and hours in San Francisco. 

Is it not a fact that the best class of workers are influenced by 
such considerations and are seeHne l.os Aneeles. to avoid the tv- 
rannv of political labor bosses in San Francisco, the latter are able to 
live like princes while their luckless dupes are out on strike much 
of the time, or are paving heavy assessments to defend bomb-throw- 
ers and other lawbreakers that deserve State prison more than the 

help of industrious union workmen. 

• • » 

Ungrateful Einstein 

What do y"" think of that ea?ook Einstein? Nohodv ever 

heard of him or his theorv of relativity, till he rame to the United 
»nd began to li"e on something better than hot does and ^sauerkraut. 
Vow he is on the other side of the Atlantic and savs: "Ach! dose 
Yankees dey are liddle olavdogs of de vimmen and spend dere 
money in a reckless manner. 

If we had the zaloot back in America, we'd show him what our 
women can do. Every primary grade school ma'am would stick 
hairpins in his fake theorv of relativity— whatever it means. 

• • • 

Despairing Philosopher 

It should not amaze newspaper readers that Oeorge Bernard 
Shaw has given up the fight to improve mankind as hopeless. He 
thinks we are all getting worse in spite of what he has done to pull 
us out of the rut. Perhaps that is the trouble. George Keep your 
hands and pen off for a while and stick to your old method of world 
reform by soap-box oratory in London. The world is full of philo- 
sophers, like George, who rattle along what they think is the right 
road of life until they near the end. and then they suddenly 
realize that they made a wrong start and are jogging down a crook- 
ed lane to the toboggan. 



San Francisco News Letter and 



Bishop Moreland's Startling Figures 

By HARVEY BROUGHAM 



The Right Reverend Bishop Moreland of Sacramento expresses 
the belief that marriage is worth saving, notwithstanding the op- 
posite opinions of some fiction writers and the disquieting increase 
of divorces in the United States. The worthy Bishop has taken the 
trouble to compile the divorce figures and they certainly are not cal- 
culated to gratify those old-fashioned citizens, who believe that the 
home is the true foundation of the civilized commonwealth. 

As a churchman, as well as an American citizen, Bishop More- 
land is an admirer of the home. "The homes of the American peo- 
ple are the citadels of its strength," he says. 

"But in every State except South Carolina (where divorce is 
banned) a powerful virus affecting American life at its source, un- 
dermining the institution of marriage, rotting the underpinning of 
the whole structure of civilized life." 

With the free and easy view that dissatisfied couples had better 
be divorced, and hunt new partners. Bishop Moreland has no pa- 
tience. Such complacency, he calls "barnyard morality." 

"County records of the United States show men and women who 
have been divorced and remarried five and six times. Lustful males, 
marrying for physical satisfaction, cast off wives at .pleasure, as if 
they were kept mistresses." 

The good Bishop waxes angry in his tabulation of the offenders. 
"Mining kings, oil millionaires and war profiteers, grown suddenly 
rich, have put away the faithful partner of the days of poverty and 
struggle and lavished their new made wealth upon actresses. Selfish 
women, sacrificing men to their passion for jewels, clothes and lux- 
ury, are encouraged under our laws to sell their bodies to the highest 
bidder, yet continue to move in decent society as respectable wo- 
men. This is no fancy picture. It describes what is going on to- 
day all over the United States. Conditions are growing worse. 

"If easy divorce continues at the present rate in this country, the 
ideal of true marriage, as the union of one man and one woman 
until death shall part, will gradually fade from the consciousness of 
the American people and be replaced by a kind of barnyard moral- 
ity," asserts the Bishop of Sacramento. 

The tendency to promiscuous cohabitation is shown in the kind 
of fiction which is so popular now in the libraries. The heroine in 
a recent novel which has come under Bishop Moreland's notice thus 
addresses her lover: 

"I believe in the sacredness of love, but I will have no priest to 
utter his superstitious formula over my head. Nor will I submit to 
any civil ordinance To bind myself before men would be even more 
foolish than to take an oath in the presence of a God I do not be- 
lieve in." 

This is certainly going it rather strong and must have given the 
Bishop quite a shock. Not only does the heroine want sexual free- 
dom — free love — but she proclaims herself an atheist. Bishop 
Moreland should remember that it is not America alone which is pub- 
lishing that kind of philosophy. In England some of the eminent 
writers have gone to the extent of referring to the Creator's handi- 
work as "colossal blundering." There, indeed, is a sample of hu- 
man conceit. Man, who knows not whence he came, or what mo- 
ment his whole race may perish from the earth, undertakes to critic- 
ise the God of the Universe. When such contempt of Divinity is 
expressed it is not wonderful that scorns of marriage vows should be 
expressed in fiction and the divorce courts. 

According to Bishop Moreland's figures, "divorces in America 
in 1884 were 23.000; in 1916. 114,000. Increase of population 
during the period was 62 per cent, increase of divorces 238 per 
cent. Divorce has increased in the United States over three and 
one-half times as fast as the population. 

"In the past 20 years 1,883.000 homes have been wrecked by di- 
vorce in the United States. Since there are two people to each di- 
vorce this means that 3,767,000 were separated by divorce in the 
first twenty years of this century. 



"The number of children named, in divorce decrees for the past 
twenty years is 1,318,000. That is to say a vast army of innocent 
children were deprived of the loving oversight of one parent or an- 
other, being made orphans or half orphans not by the hand of Pro- 
vidence but by the selfishness of their parents. 

"A black belt of divorce stretches across the centre of the United 
States." declares Bishop Moreland. This belt includes eleven States 
in which more than half of all divorces are granted. The States are 
Michigan, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Missouri. Kentucky, Okla- 
homa, Arkansas, Tennessee, and Texas. In 1916 those eleven States 
granted 58,021 divorces out of the 114,000 national total. 

In 57 counties there was one divorce for every three marriages. 
The average divorce rate for the United States is 141 per 100.000 
of net population, but that rate is enormously exceeded in the fol- 
lowing States: Nevada, 652; Montana, 413; Arizona, 358; Ore- 
gon. 277; Washington, 239; California, 230. New Hampshire 
comes next, seventh in rank of easy divorce in the United States, 
with a rate of 227. 

Divorce is no new form of domestic unrest. Bishop Moreland 
points out that in its earlier stages the Republic of Rome had no di- 
vorces for 520 years. Rome reached its pinnacle, and then came 
the decay, and divorce grew common. Cicero put away Terentia to 
obtain a new dowry. Pompey divorced Mucia. Caesar divorced 
Pompeia. Cato loaned his wife to Hortensius, and took her back 
a wealthy widow when the old man died. Maecenas changed his 
wife frequently. Women likewise divorced their husbands. 

Of these happenings Bishop Moreland remarks: 

"With such conditions among the cultured classes we leave to 
the imagination the rottenness that pervaded the populace. At last 
the nation found itself crushed by the penalties of violated laws of 
nature and of God. Weakened by lust, the wealthy pursuit of pleas- 
ure, inflamed against one another by animal passions, the 120.000,- 
000 Romans fell upon one another in constant rage of civil wars that 
ceased not until the republic was destroyed." 

History has a habit of repeating itself. 



A BUSINESS MAN'S CONTRAST 

An important business man from London, after visiting the United 
States, is surprised at the ease with which he could see big business 
men in our cities. 

"It might take a week to see me in London," he remarked. "I am 
the busiest man in the firm, occupied with innumerable details which 
here are performed by an efficient staff of subordinates who leave 
the executives free for bigger things. The first thing an executive 
does in this country when he is appointed is to gather efficient peo- 
ple about him. In England the first thing he prepares to do is be- 
come the clearing house and administering centre for the stupid peo- 
ple who are under him. 

"Of course I can't say that you Americans don't go to the ex- 
treme in working too hard on the job. I stopped at Newark with an 
English friend on the way to plav golf. He was interested in look- 
ing over, in the half hour he had to spare, one of the large depart- 
ment stores. One of the executives urged him to wait and see some 
cne of importance there, and was immediately surprised and rather 
shocked when my friend said he would not give up his game of golf 
to land the biggest order in the country. 



BANK OF ITALY 

Is it possible that the Bank of Italy, which was little more than 
a name in 1904. has grown to the titanic dimensions of a repres- 
entative Pacific Coast banking institution, with 267.206 depositors 
and deposits amounting to over $170,000,000. A pioneer has to 
rub his eves and stare again and again at the new edifice of the 
Bank of Italy at Market and Powell streets before the fact is fully 
borne in on him, that the miracle has been wrought, and by men 
who make no claim to be wizards. 



"Billcins tips his caddie frightfully." That isn't a tip; it's hush 
money." — Life. 



A Tax on Ladies dresses worn above the knees. We gotta do 
something to stop the shrinkage. 



California Advertiser for July 16, 1921 



The Rev. Worth M. Tippy, who has been ad- 
A Prophet Questioned dressing employers and labor councils in 
Oregon, and trying to carry water on both 
shoulders, has been ably answered by the Portland Oregonian. Dr. 
lippy is executive secretary of the social department of the Federal 
Council of Churches — whatever that may mean. The Doctor be- 
lieves the Open Shop will fail. The Spectator asks the prophet to 
give his reasons. Why should it fail? demands the fearless advo- 
cate of the American Plan. 

Its purpose is to secure to all citizens the right to work and earn 
a living in peace. If Dr. Tippy thinks the open-shop plan of em- 
ployment must fail as against the closed shop, he must believe that 
the closed shop is a better system. And yet the closed shop is the 
symbol of industrial tyranny, the method whereby professional labor 
leaders secure and maintain a monopoly of wage-providing jobs. 
The closed shop and the open shop are what their names imply: the 
one is closed to all but union members; in the other, no question is 
asked as to union, fraternal, religious or other affiliations; compet- 
ency is the only requirement. Will Dr. Tippy tell us why in this 
democracy any body of professional walking delegates should have 
a monopoly of labor, and be permitted to say who shall and who 
shall not earn a living? Will he kindly explain why an American ci- 
tizen should have to join a union and pay tribute to 150,000 profes- 
sional labor leaders before he is permitted to get work? Will he be 
good enough to tell us why the doors of employment should be closed 
to any American who is willing to work? It must be assumed that 
Dr. Tippy, because of his official connection with the church federa- 
tion, is a preacher of the Gospel. Is his a closed shop or open shop 
church? Does he demand that the members of his congregation 
shall carry union cards before they are permitted to hear of their 
sins and learn how they may be washed away? or does he welcome all 
comers, and bid them drink freely of the waters of life? The Spec- 
tator thinks Dr. Tippy preaches in an open shop church and bars no 
one from the enjoyment of his spiritual consolation. But he insists 
on closed shop industry, and would permit none but union members 
to earn a living. He has a queer notion of the rights of man. 



HARDING'S ADMINISTRATION WILL SOLVE IT 

There is great confidence that President Harding's administration 
will solve the Mexican problem in some satisfactory manner and 
soon. President Obregon has done many good things for Mexico in 
the five months he has been President, and he realizes that the finest 
of all his achievements would be to straighten out the tangle about 
American vested rights in Mexico and have the sister Republic rec- 
ognized by the United States. If any American official can expedite 
the matter on this side of the border it is Secretary Hughes, who has 
all the experience of a great justice and lawyer as well as the acu- 
men of a statesman. 

When once Mexico has been recognized by the United States an 
era of extraordinary trade development between the two countries 
will begin. 

Whereas the United States exported to Mexico goods valued at 
only $50,000,000 a year prior to 1917, this business expanded to 
$140,000,000 in 1920, and that this year ii will approach $280.- 
000,000. 

Obregon has endeared himself to the masses by his democratic 
ways, his sincerity of purpose and his broad grasp of Mexico's com- 
plex problems. Particularly are the people gratified by his deep con- 
sideration for the welfare of the working class, who constitute 80 
per cent of the population. The Mexicans are confident that the 
policies he is putting into effect will result in speedy rehabilitation of 
the economic structure of the nation and direct its progress along 
sound and progressive lines. 

Mexico's enormous undeveloped resources in minerals, oils, for- 
ests, agricultural lands and water power, and the unrivalled oppor- 
tunities offered for manufacturing of many kinds wait only on re- 
storation of friendly relations with the United States. The differ- 
ences between the two nations are not serious. Apparently the 
chief obstacle from the Mexican standpoint is one of terminology 
rather than of specific terms. Mexico recognizes the just claims of 
the United States and asks only that these claims be presented in a 
manner which will not humble her pride. 



COME OUT OF THE TRANCE 

The Oakland bridge .plan has brought out complaints from com- 
muters about the Third and Townsend station. To reach it requires 
a slow journey and spoils the trip down the Santa Clara Valley. 
Ihis seems a colossal error. The towns on the Peninsula are with- 
in two minutes' train time of one another. Before many years, if 
we ever get out of the rut, San Francisco will have become joined 
to the southern towns. What provision is being made for that de- 
velopment? Very little, as far as the average citizen can see. 

In New York you can walk across the street from the Belmont 
Hotel at Forty-Second street and board a train for California. In 
San Francisco a part of the day has to be expended on a slow trip 
in dirty surface cars to begin a trip to Burlingame. Doesn't it look 
like frightful silurianism? 

Suppose that we had a train service down the peninsula, like the 
Illinois Central gives Chicago suburbanites, what a place the Santa 
Clara Valley would become. Commuters could run in half an hour 
to a district free from fog and wind — a perfect Garden of Eden 
when subjected to cultivation and given water. But the whole .prob- 
lem of carrying suburbanites down the Peninsula, and letting them 
build up towns and establish villas, is in a primitive state. It re- 
minds one of the location of cemeteries in the Western Addition 
where they now retard the city's growth. 

Had Harriman lived, he might have improved the condition under 
which our citizens have suffered, but he died at the critical moment 
and we have suffered from the loss. It needs some competition to 
stir up people. We see that in the present uprising against the labor 
trust which has throttled San Francisco for thirty years. It might 
go on thirty years more if the bunch of Iowans in the citrus belt had 
not carved a harbor out of their mud-flats and built a city which has 
taken the political control from San Francisco. 

The pioneers had more vision than the Native Sons. Some of 
them saw that this was the site for the New York of the Pacific. 
Ralston, who had the vision and the spirit of a Cecil Rhodes, could 
see the possibilities of San Francisco. He built up a great bank and 
the Palace Hotel, which became known around the world. He estab- 
lished industries, and had no limit to his ambition. He predicted 
that the merchant ships of San Francisco would sail the seven seas, 
but we have not seen that predicted fleet. The labor trust has stop- 
ped its development. Ralston forgot that life is short and he never 
lived to see the fruition of his great schemes. 

Will anybody in this generation live to see the development of 
which the great pioneers dreamed? Not if our ideals go no further 
than prize ring championships, dancehalls, sex movies and all the 
other worthless activities. We have the opportunities for great 
things. When will we begin to realize them? Wien wiil we learn 
that the first step in metropolitan extension is superb transportation 
in city and suburbs? 



IRONICAL FRENCH JOURNALIST 

The Paris Journal is somewhat ironical in its reference to the 
large staff, sent with the bust of Rodin, which Franch has presented 
Canada. "That bust must be very heavy." says Clement Vautel, 
one of the Journal's cleverest writers, "for eighteen persons have 
been designated to protect it on the journey." One remarks amongst 
these porteurs a marechal of France, an admiral, a senator, a paint- 
er, a litterateur, an aviator, a colonel, an admiral, a sena'or. a paint- 
unhappy bust takes chances, and it would not astonish us if we 
learned that it had been broken on the journey. 

It seems to Vautel that all the ceremonial proprieties could have 
been complied with, had the bust been placed in charge of Marechal 
Fayolle with three or four poilus. "The bust having reached Can- 
ada, the poilus could open the case and remove the straw envelope 
from the bust and the marechal could then perform the oratorical 
requirements. 

"Le Marechal — Voila! It is one bust of Rodin — one genuine 
bust. You savez there are many ialse ones in circulation." 

"The Canadians (politely) : 'It is superb. You gratify us.' 



San Francisco News Letter and 




Ck.*U*4j± T IJx<!*T& r .** F . 



Jarred the Sultana's Nerves 

Apropos of the recent attractive luncheon given the Sultana 
from Afhangistan, some breaks occurred that would have made Rud- 
yard Kipling sriile. Mayor Rolph apologized to the Princess for 
our inhospitable temperance laws, overlooking the fact that Moham- 
medan abhorrence of booze excels even that of Mr. Volstead. An- 
other violent break of Oriental etiquette jarred the Orientals when 
the royal lady rose to depart. Her gallant but plebeian escort gall- 
antly offered his arm. In Kabul that would have landed him in a 
dungeon for life if not lost him his head. When our native sons in 
office banquet Oriental celebrities, they should get a few tips from 
some globe-trotter, or enquire at the British Consulate, where they 

have all the fine points of decorum to notables codified. 

* * * 

Historical Comparisons 

The French will never get over the acquittal of General Stenger 
last weeek, of the charge that he ordered his troops to kill French 
wounded in the war. Worst of all, the crowds in Leipsic, where the 
trial took place, demonstrated their delight when the fair minded 
Frenchmen might have expected that the defendant would be con- 
victed and turned over to the Paris mob, to chase him into the Seine 
and sink him with cobble stones. How hard it is to conduct war, so 
as to be nice and pleasant in the eyes of everybody. Even yet the 
historians are jawing one another over Napoleon's exploits in Egypt, 
in killing 3,000 of his prisoners to avoid the trouble and expense of 
carrying them along, when his foes had him somewhat on the run. 

* * * 

Will Drive Them to Prayers 

When those Sunday-Sup word spinners monkey with a bald lie, 
why don't they try to put some hair on it. Take that story about a 68- 
year-old manufacturer who married a young widow and couldn't get 
her to be a wife in fact, though he pleaded lovingly at her chamber 
door to relent and turn the key. There is unbridled imagination for 
you. Even if the old boy had a new set of interstitial glands, it is 
impossible to imagine him playing Romeo in his pajamas on the 
wrong side of a bedroom portal, while an experienced widow set up 
technical objections. People will quit reading such Sunday stuff soon 
and go back to their prayer books to kill time. 



"Sam" As An Angler 

The Hon. Samuel M. Shortridge of California — our own "Sam" 
— is depicted in the illustrated supplement of the New York Times of 
July 3, as a true disciple of old Isaac Walton. Fishing rod in hand, 
our junior Senator stands in shirt-sleeves besides a stream said to be 
"on the outskirts of Washington." His legislative duties have not 
changed him in the least. His smile is just as friendly as ever, and 
his noble dome of thought just as serene, as if he stood on the bank 
of the Truckee trout-stream expectant of a five-pound Rainbow. His 
attire might appear to a Truckee native as rather precise, with its 
"biled shirt," stiff collar, fine necktie and dark pantaloons, but no 
doubt the fish in the outskirts of Washington are a sophisticated set, 
that turn up their noses at worms proferred by rough-lojking anglers. 
If Washington was not so far off, we would all be expecting fish 
from our popular and talented Senator. 



EMIGRATION FOR UNEMPLOYED ENGLISH 

The unemployment question is so pressing in England that Lloyd 
George is giving ear to emigration schemes. 

"I think we shall have to face the problem of emigration," he 
said in the House of Commons. "It is an unpleasant suggestion, 
but I mean emigration within the Empire." 

Certain preliminary inquiries are now being made, and the Min- 
istry of Labor is inviting suggestions from various cocieiies enaaged 
in social work as to the best means for setting up the necessary ma- 
chinery. 

One definite inquiry is as to the advisability of concentrating 
first on schemes for emigrating men in trades that have the greatest 
proportion of unemployed. 



A Tax on the Half piece bathing suit. (Very unpop. Tax we 



A Tax on any auto sold as "mechanically perfect." There 
ain't no sech animal. 



Santa Cruz 
California 



CASA DEL REY, 

THE MILLION DOLLAR FIREPROOF HOTEL 

The ideal spot for your summer outing with its warm beach bathing; dancing; 
good music; artistic, home-like, spacious lobby. 

This is a most wonderful place for children. Beautiful playgrounds; sanitary 
warm bathing pool; swimming instructors; saddle ponies for children. Special 
kitchenette where maid can prepare food for young children. 

Motor roads in fine condition via Sargents, Chittenden Pass and Watsonville, 
or the Coast Route via La Honda. The Southern Pacific offers special round trip, 
week-end rates as well as tickets good for several weeks. 

Cottage City, operated on the European plan, is also under the same manage- 
ment as Casa Del Rey. 

Correspondence regarding rates for families with maids and children solicited. 
Special rates by the week or for extended stays of a month or two. Address : 

CASA DEL REY, Santa Cruz, Calif. 

MORRIS & WARNER, 'Proprietors 

Phone 600 




The treasured 
secret of coffee - 
roustind«producef 
flic wondrous flavor 

(Swell's 

^^^NAIIONAI CREST 

Qffee 



California Advertiser /or July 16, 1921 



PERSONALS 

-Mrs. William G. Parrott, Miss Evelyn 



Parrott and Mrs. Corbett Moody are al the 
Casa del Rey, Santa Cruz, wheie they will 
pass a portion of the summer. They mo- 
tored down from the city. 
Mr. and Mrs. Nion Tucker have re- 
turned to their Burlingame home from Santa 
Barbara, where they spent a week at El Mi- 
rasol. During their visit Mr. and Mrs. Geof- 
frey Stuart Courtney gave a luncheon at 
the Santa Barbara Country Club and also 
entertained Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Lindsley 
Fiske of Chicago and Mr. Leigh Sypher of 
San Mateo. Mr. and Mrs. Sypher have 
rented a house at Santa Barbara for the 
summer. 

Mr. Gordon Tevis came from Santa 

Earbara with Mr. Herman Oelrichs and has 
joined his father and Mr. William S. T^vis 
in Burlingame. Mr. Gordon Tevis has lived 
in Los Angeles and Santa Barbara for the 
.past year. 

Mrs. Alpheus Bull has gone to St. Hel- 
ena to visit Mrs. George W. Starr at the 
Bourn ranch and will be there for a fort- 
night. Miss Newell Bull is visiting friends 
on the Russian River. 

Dr. and Mrs. Howard Naffziger are 

spending a few weeks at Lake Tahoe. 
Mrs. C. Augustus Spreckols, accom- 
panied by her niece, Mrs. W. L. Richards 
(Orrie Wooster), and the latter's husband, 
arrived Monday from New York to be here 
a fortnight. Mrs. Spreckels will return to 



her home in Paris in September. They are 
al the Fairmont Hotel. 

Mrs. Stetson Winslow, who is camping 

with Mr. and Mrs. Robert Oxnard and Mr. 
and Mrs. William Hinckley Taylor on the 
Feather River, will go to Portland next 
month for a visit to her daughter, Mrs. Syd- 
ney Van Wyck Peters, and Mr. Peters, whose 
marraige took place last April. Mrs. Peters 
will come to San Francisco to spend the 
Christmas holidays. The young couple r.re 
established in an attractive house in Marshall 
Street. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest A. Stent and their 

daughter, Miss Frances Stent, are in their 
country home in Palo Alto for the summer 
months. Mrs. Stent had an informal lunch- 
eon Tuesday afternoon, having a few friends 
of the Menlo colony. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Sheridan Ner- 

ney and Master Hughson Nerney have 
opened their country home in Ross for the 
season. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Christenson 

and Miss Edna Christenson left Wednesday 
for their camp in Mendocino County. 
Mrs. Charles C. Mohun and her daugh- 
ter, Catherine, was among last week's guests 
at El Eancanto Hotel. Santa Barbara. 

Mrs. Andrew G. McCarthy and her 

children, Miss Mary Louise, Miss Betsy and 
Master Andrew Jr., of San Mateo have gone 
to Lake Tahoe. 

Mrs. Curtis Lindley has gone to Salt 

Lake for a visit with her daughter. Mrs. 
Vernon Reed. 



Locomotivataxia — "Isn't that a pretty 
slow railroad?" "That depends on circum- 
stances," replied the commuter. "The only 
times it seems in any great hurry is when 
you happen to be running to catch the 
train." — Washington Star. 



Not for Her — An old dame at a railway 
station asked a porter where she could get 
her ticket. The man pointed in the direction 
of the ticket office. "You can get it there," 
he said, "through the pigeonhole." 

"Get away with you, idiot!" she exclaim- 
ed. "How can I get through that little hole ? 
i ain't no pigeon ! " — Boston Post. 



WASTED EFFORT 

"Painting is one of the oldest of arts — 
but not one picture in ten thousand is worth 
looking at," declares Benjamin de Casseres 
in the New York Jimes. 

"Literature is one of the oldest of the arts 
— but not one book in ten thousand is real 
literature." 

"Sculpture is one of the oldest of the arts 
— but how many Rodins, Michelangelos and 
Praxiteles are there?" 

'Playwriting is one of the oldest of the 
arts — but there isn't one play in fifty that is 
worth seeing and not one in ten thousand 
that lives." 

"Most books, plays, music and paintings 
are only fit for the ashcan — after incalcu- 
lable years of work on them." 



Fi 



ines 



for Girl Smokers 

By R. THOMPSON 



UNLIKE the shimmy dance, smoking for women has come down 
from European high society, instead of up from the half- 
world. 

At Washington, D. C, smoking has become so prevalent 
among women clerks, that Representative Paul B. Johnson of Miss- 
issippi has introduced a bill to prohibit "female persons." as he 
styles them, from smoking in public. Offenders are to be fined $25 
for the firs! offence and $100 for subsequent violations. 

"Female persons" addicted to the seances with Lady Nicotine 
will watch the fate of Representative Johnson's bill to restrain 
Washington clerks. 

All "smart" American rcstraurants now permit smoking by wo- 
men. San Francisco, always cosmopolitan, became accustomed 
years ago to smoking in hotels and restaurants by fashionable wo- 
men. 

Not long ago a Pasadena guest at one of our leading hotels was 
lighting her cigarette under the dinner table — even as now many 
people in cafes pour out their bottles. A polite waiter approached 
the bashful guest and tendered her a lighted match. "Oh!" she 
exclaimed. "I didn't think they had got to that up here." 

Years ago when Billy Woods was manager of the Hotel St. 
Francis, a head waiter ran to tell him that some foreign woman who 
had come by an Oriental steamer was smoking in the lounge. "Lei 
her smoke her head off if she wants." answered the manager. 
"There's no law to stop her. and we certainly aren't going to make 
one." t 

So much a matter of established habit has smoking by "female 
persons" become that each costume now — be it society or chorus so- 
ciety — has its particular cigarette case, its match box, and its holder 



hanging on a chatelaine. They say that, this Summer, jade is the 
favorite. 

There is as much art dispensed in the fashioning of the cases as 
when the "Louis" were collecting snuff boxes. It's the smart thing 
for married women to use their husband's club cigarettes made up 
with their own initials. It's the smart thing for college girls to use 
some best young man's fraternity cigarettes. Each flapper has her 
own pet brand — for haven't cigarettes solved the long-debated prob- 
lem of what a very young flapper is to do with her hands? 

The Solid South and the Middle West may still pay special rev- 
erence to the woman who does not smoke. But New York is smoking 
like a chimney. And one who does not smoke states frankly that 
it is about as embarrassing as it is at a formal dinner if you have to 
skip the oyster course when everybody else is eating oysters. As for 
getting that extra respect from the men — well — in the words of a 
clever woman writer, "one might as well try to extract respect by 
wearing an old-fashioned traveling gown as a protest against skirts 
that leave the knees exposed." 



The EYE and the BRAIN 

mory. Headache, Dizziness, Weak, 
Inflamed, Smarting, Sensitive or Gluey 
Eyes, Floating Spots, Crusty or Granu- 
lated Eyelids, Astigmatism, Watery Eyes 
and inability to *ee objects clearly — all 
niptoms and many other ailments 
can be directly or indirectly attributed to 
EYE STRAIN. 
TO RELIEVE THESE AILMENTS YOU 

MUST REMOVE THE CAUSE 
The latest and most scientific instruments 
Arc n-tU in examining children's eyes and 
complicated cases of eye defects. 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

EXCLUSIVE EYESIGHT SPECIALIST 

Charter Member American Association of 

Opticians 

27 Year? in San Francisco 

960 MARKET STREET 

Betwern Mason and Taylor 
i RAN CISCO 




10 



San Francisco News Letter and 





FINA NCIAL^ 




SAN FRANCISCO CITIZENS may con- 
gratulate themselves on the partial and im- 
pending complete victory won over the 
Closed Shop by those who are back of the 
adoption of the American plan. The Build- 
ers' Exchange, and the contractors who be- 
long to that body, the material men, and ail 
others who have contributed, are entitled to 
the thanks of everybody in the Metropolitan 
District for the coming defeat of the Closed 
Shop. From now on, as far as the building 
trades are concerned, we may expect an un- 
wonted activity. We are needing dwelling 
houses and we are needing modern business 
blocks. The unions, in their mad endeavor 
to continue the wage profiteering in which 
they indulged themselves, all through the 
war and after the armistice was signed, were 
willing to set San Francisco back for years 
that their members might continue to take 
their unearned profits out of the pockets of 
those who wanted homes. At this writing, 
the final decision has not been given, but it 
is expected that union men will return to 
work wherever they can get it and that they 
will accept the American Plan, under pro- 
test. So far so good. But it must be made, 
better than that. The American Plan should 
be enforced in all trades and callings and we 
should not stop until we can call this com- 
munity INDUSTRIALLY FREE of the tyran- 
ny of the professional leaders of labor. We 
know that there are men in this community 
who are determined that this shall be so. 
One of the evening newspapers prints a story 
that there is a big conspiracy to the end of 
establishing the OPEN SHOP and that the 
conspirators have the banking interests be- 
hind them and that there has been millions 
subscribed "to break the unions." The story 
was categorically denied by officials of the 
Chamber of Commerce, that body having 
been accused of having the management of 
the campaign and the duty of disbursing the 
war funds. It was too much to hope for 
that the evening paper had secured correct 
information on this subject. Of course, there 
is some truth in what was published, because 
there is a wide-spread determination to free 
the city of the kind of unionism practiced 
in the past. San Francisco is not aiming to 
rid itself of its unions, but it is certainly 
determined to rid the unions of the kind of 
practices which have been in vogue for so 
many years. The unions might help in that 
direction by ridding themselves of the kind 
of leaders the unions have had for so long a 
time. This is, of course, a very difficult thing 
for the unions to do. The leadership of 
unions has developed into an exact science 
and if anyone imagines that the majority 
rules in the management of unions or in the 
disposition of strikes, he or she is woefully 
mistaken. The leader of a union is profes- 
sionally a leader and he usually knows just 



how to handle every member in his union — 
by cajolery, by threats, by beatings, through 
the influence of women, by appealing to class 
prejudice and through fear. The opponent 
of such a leader cannot hope to get into of- 
fice, except at a time when there is a gen- 
eral upheavel in all of the unions and a very 
general desire to expel those from office who 
have been a terror to the community and 
blood suckers on the union membership for 
years. With the settlement of the strike and 
the return to work of those in the unions 
there will be a much better condition estab- 
lished in the detail businesi lines of the c ; ty. 
For a long time production has stopped and 
until production is resumed, there will not be 
the free spending which existed before the 
strike conditions were established. It is to 
be hoped that the employers of labor in the 
building trades will take steps to protect 
those who stood by them in their hour of dis- 
tress through a continued employment and 
by protecting them as against the persecu- 
tions sure to be levelled at them by the mem- 
bers of union organizations. One way of ac- 
complishing this is to let it be known that 
if any non-union wage earner is attacked or 
persecuted by union men, or by their sym- 
pathising friends, that all union help on thai 
particular job will immediately be discharg- 
ed. A disciplinary rule of this character will 
more surely protect the free worker than ten 
policemen could. We have established the 
American plan. Let us see to it that it is 
maintained for all time. The unions have 
always practiced the rule of "one for all and 
all for one." It is high time the employer; 
adopted the same slogan, with the additional 
understanding when it is adopted that it is 
a case of live and let live. Members of 
unions must not be persecuted cr be.i;en up, 
but those who prefer to remain free workers 
must be guaranteed the same privilege. 

Twelve of the big planing mills of the 
city have adopted the American Plan, after 
having given the Closed Shop a trial for 
years. The San Francisco Planing Mill 
Owner's Association has adopted the plan of 
the Building Trades Council. The Mills are 
running from today on the American Plan. 
For years it has been the custom to force the 
use of the union labor "rubber stamp" on all 
milled lumber, whether the lumber passed 
through a mill or not. If the lumber for a 
job did not have the stamp, then the men 
on the job refused to handle it until the 
stamp was obtained. As lumber is a basic 
material in almost any kind of construction 
and enters as well into construction at all 
times, not having the stamp meant that jobs 
stopped right there. 

Those representing the building trades are 
circulating the rumor that imported help 
brought here by members of the Building Ex- 
change is roaming the streets begging for a 



livelihood. The secretary of I lie Hiiilders' 
Exchange strenuously denies this statement. 
If there are men on the street begging there 
is no excuse for it, because any number of 
men may find work today. All beggars 
should be run in for vagrancy and forced to 
give an account of themselves. With this 
strike-lockout on, the jobs are hunting the 
men, not the men the jobs. 

We are told that associations of women's 
clubs are to interfere in the situation with a 
view to bringing about some sort of a com- 
promise settlement. Those who think they 
may thus intrude shojld be taught why su;h 
an intrusion is full of danger to the com- 
munity. There is no midway line between 
the American Plan and Closed Shop union- 
ism and there can never be. The American 
Plan stands for equal opportunity among the 
employed and the employer as well. The 
Closed Shop is opportunity to earn a living 
for the members of unions alone and it 
means control of the building situation in all 
it"-, branches by the professional leaders of 
labor. 



SHIPPING — Ships come in and ships go 
cut almost on a normal schedule. The op- 
eiators have won and the men must return 
to work on the American Plan. The owners 
and operators have won because of the fact 
that in the struggle they had public opinion 
with them. No one wants to see the United 
States back to the position it was in before 
the war caused us to build up the greatest 
mercantile armada the world has ever seen. 
Business in export and import lines is im- 
proving and this is specially noticeable in the 
line of exports. Until quite recently the im- 
portations were increasing in volume much 
more rapidly than were ihe export \tions. 
Now, the exports are increasing. It is noted, 
however, that these exports are in large 
measure only of articles of necessity. There 
is, of course, room for a much greater im- 
provement. The Pacific Mail Steamship 
Company has scheduled to begin the opera- 
iion of a line of steamers between S^.ii Fran- 
cisco and Mexican ports. The vessel to in- 
itiate this service is the steamer San Juan, 
which will leave San Francisco on July 23rd. 
The ports of call are Ensenada, Magdalena, 
San Jose del Caboa, and La Paz. It is ru- 
mored that other companies are contemplat- 
ing a competing Mexican service. The Pa- 
cific Mail, it is said, is ready to divert Pa- 
nama steamers to this service if the indica- 
tions are that such an increase is warranted 
by the amount of cargo tonnage secured. 
There is no doubt whatever that, with a rec- 
ognition of Mexico and the resumption of 
diplomatic relations, business with the South- 
ern Republic will immediately increase, in a 
very large way. Mexico has not suffered in 
the least through the war in Europe, she is 
wanting our trade, her people have plenty of 
money and would rather spend it here than 
anywhere else. There is every probability 
of an early signing of a new treaty with 
Mexico and, from that time on, we may de- 
vote our attention to the expansion of our 
tiade with the rich Pacific coast section of 
Mexico. Trade conditions with regard to 
Asia are improving only very slowly and. be- 
cause of this fact, there has been but little 



California Advertiser for July 16, 1921 



11 



improvement noticeable as far as shipping is 
concerned, but, despite this, it must not be 
believed that there is not a vast amount of 
freight going to the Far East and beyond. In 
a year from now, double the number of 
steamers now in service will be necessary to 
carry our manufactures to the Orient and 
Asia generally, and to bring back the prod- 
ucts of India, Dutch East Indies, China, 
Japan, and the Philippines. 



FRUIT FROM CHILE— Recently the 
Chilean government made a shipment of 
fresh fruits from Valparaiso, via the steamer 
'•.ssequibo, to New York City. The fruit ar- 
rived in splendid condition, although >\\c ves- 
sel is not specially equipped for c old storage 
uses. This shipment has opened a market for 
Lhilean fruits in New York, when that mar- 
ket is bare of the fruits, which usually come 
from Florida or California, I he seasons being 
exactly the opposite to ours on the other side 
of the Equator. It is not with the idea cf 
pointing out the enterprise of the Chilears 
that this article is written, but to draw atten- 
tion to the fact that the ime consumed in 
tiansit from Valparaiso to New York was 25 
days and that in making this trip the ves- 
sel crossed the Equator. It takes but seven 
teen days for a trip, from San Francisco to 
New York, by the faster of our freight ves- 
sels making the run. A refrigerator service 
for the carriage of California fruits to market 
might be established which would certainly 
meet with success. The difference in time 
between shipment by rail or by steamer is 
only five days, the rail route being shorter. 
The fruit shipped by steamer, if the vessel is 
equipped for the purpose, would arrive in 
better condition than if shipped by rail. Fruit 
has recently been shipped to New York by 
steamer via the Canal and has arrived in 
first class condition. This fact and the in- 
formation contained in the news about the 
Chilean shipment establishes an absolute in- 
dependence for the fruit shipper and, as far 
as the extreme Eastern points are concerned. 
it means that there is no reason ever again 
to fear freight congestion and the lack of 
cars at the time the various fruit crops have 
to be moved Eastward. New York, be it re- 
membered, is the great distributing point for 
about thirty-five million people. Thirty-five 
million people buy directly from New York 
and are to be found within a very short dist- 
ance of the big American metropolis. A sys- 
tem of rail and water shipment, a compre- 
hensive publicity and sales campaign, and 
that thirty-five million market is ours. We 
should go after it right now by associated ef- 
fort. 



INSURANCE— By a decision of ll-.e Dis- 
tiict Court of Appeals it has been ntfinred 
'.hat the place to bring a court ,-ciion fo- the 
payment of the policy is at the place where 
the holder lived and died. At least that is 
the way the daily papers have construed the 
decision. Nothing, as far as we learn, was 
said by the court as to what should be done 
if the holder of the policy lives in one place 
and dies in another far remote from where 
he became insured. The case was one deny- 
ing the application of the Order of Railway 
Employees for a change of the place of trial 



from Humboldt County to San Francisco 
County. Mrs. Alta Robinson brought suit in 
Humboldt County for recovery upon the po- 
licy of her son, Stanley Robinson, who re- 
sided and was killed in Humboldt County in 
1919. The company had applied for a 
change of venue to San Francisco, claiming 
this was where the contract of insurance was 
entered into and where the company had its 
place of business. Governor Stephens is 
under the ban of anger on the part of many 
of insurance froternities because of his vetoes 
of acts that were favored by the insurance 
people. The residency agency measure and 
the agents qualification have been quietly 
put to death by the exercise of the veto 
power. The governor's acts in these matters 
have incurred for him the outspoken denunc- 
iation of both agents and brokers. The Home 
Fire and Marine is forging to the front again 
.ind there has been vitality blow:i into it by 
the Firemen's Fund. The company re-starts 
well and will soon, according to those be- 
hind it, be in the million dollar class. The 
Caledonian American Insurance Company of 
New York has appointed the Selback and 
Deane general agency as its agents for the 
Pacific Coast, inclusive of Alaska and Ha- 
waii. The same company represents the 
Hanover Fire, Delaware Underwriters, and 
the Concordia Fire. Strolling among the 
agencies shows about the normal amount of 
lapses and the indications are that business 
in insurance circles will be as good as that of 
last year. Isn't it possible to stop the man- 
ufacture and sale of fireworks entirely? That 
is — the sort of fireworks which make forest 
and grass fires possible. We note advertise- 
ments of fireworks and crackers "for outside 
of the city use." Compared with the city, 
there is infinitely more likelihood of a fire 
through the careless use of fireworks, such 
as skyrockets, roman candles and crackers in 
the country than there is in the cities and the 
chance of greater damage exists in the coun- 
try as well. 

The fearful toll paid the last fourth of 
July in California alone, should cause town 
and village authorities and the county supei- 
visors of California to issue ordinances, at 
once, absolutely prohibiting the use of fire 
works of any kind whatsoever, except under 
supervision of officials, and by permit, and 
then only when surrounded by every possible 
safeguard to prevent fires. 

It is supposed to be useless to appeal to 
the cigarette smoker, in this matter of fires, 
but. time and again, what are known as fires 
of "roadside origin" have occuned through 
cigarettes thrown by automobilists along the 
roads into the dry and highly inflammable 
grass. If the cigarette smoker cannot be 
made to observe ordinary care in the dispo- 
sition of his fire brands he at least can be 
summarily punished whenever discovered 
throwing away a cigarette stub. Examples 
should be made of such people. Those who 
smoke are not more criminally inclined than 
are others, but the reprehensible habits of 
the cigarette smoker MUST be curbed or the 
numerous fires caused by cigarettes will be 
used by the reformers who are opposed to the 
use of the cigarette and who w»nt to p,~>s 
similar laws to those in vogue in Utah in 
every other State in the Union to abolish 



the use of the cigarette altogether. There 
are those who believe this can be done and 
there are others who believe it would be an 
c-i'tiage to do so and that is exactly the po- 
sition occupied by those who were in favor 
of and those who opposed prohibition. Those 
who are in favor of the temperate and mo- 
derate use of tobacco had better keep a 
watchful eye on the cigarette smoker or in 
time they will all be prevented the use of to- 
bacco in any shape. The reformer is one 
who never tires. Why help him along? 



IS THE LONDON TIMES FOR SALE 

The report that the London Times is los- 
ing money and that Lord Northcliffe is de- 
sirous of selling his interest is causing con- 
siderable talk in England. Northcliffe's ans- 
wer to inquirers is that "The Times is for 
sale, only on news stands." 

In 1918-19 the Times made a net profit 
of $300,000. The next year its profits fell 
to about $250,000. It is thought that this 
year the limes will show a loss, as it has 
been a very bad period for most English 
newspapers, and unfortunately the future is 
far from clear. Northcliffe should be able 
to bear the losses of a bad year. There are 
no bonds to pay interest and the interest ac- 
count of the preferred stock is only $80,000 
a year. 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC DECREASE 

Net railway operating income of the 
Southern Pacific Company again shows a 
decrease from the income of 1920 in the 
monthly statement of earnings and expenses 
issued by the Company for the month of 
May. Ihe net railway operating income of 
the Company for April, according to the re- 
port issued last month, showed an increase 
in the net income over April, 1920, when 
there was a big deficit, partly caused by the 
switchmens' strike which started in April, 
1920. and extended into May. 

The fact that the May, 1921, net railway 
operating income shows a decrease from 
that of May, 1920, despite the effects of 
the switchmen's strike in May, 1920, in- 
come and the rigid measures of economy be- 
ing observed by the Company, is evidence 
of the continued business stagnation and 
lack of traffic. 



Ticket Gamblers — Two men were waiting 
for a train and one said: "I will ask you a 
ciuestion. I will buy the tickets, then you ask 
a question, and if you can not answer your 
own, you buy the tickets. 

The other agreed to this. 

"Well," the first man said, "you see those 
rabbit holes? How do they dig those holes 
without leaving any dirt around them?" 

The other confessed: "I don't know. 
1 hat's your question, so answer it yourself." 

The first man winked and replied: "They 
begin at the bottom and dig up!" 

"But." said the second man. "how do 
they get at the bottom to begin ?" 

"That's your question," was the first man's 
rejoinder. "Answer it yourself." 

The other man bought the tickets. 

— Boston Post. 



12 



San Francisco News Letter and 




ociot 



Engagements 

The engagement was announced of 

Miss Ruby Virginia Hale, daughter or Mr. 
and Mrs. R;uben B. Hale, and Mr. Oliver 
C. Field, son of Mr. and Mrs. C. 1 !. Field 
of Alaska, at a prettily appointed luncheon 
given at the Fairmont Hotci on Saturday by 
the bride to be. Miss Hale is a graduate 
of Stanford University and a popular mem- 
ber of the younger set of "3an Francisco so- 
ciety. Her fiance graduated from Stanford 
as a marine engineer and during the war 
served in the navy with the rank of lieu- 
tenant. 

Mrs. Ella Gilbert William? has an- 
nounced the engagement of her daughter. 
Miss Margaret Williams, to Dr. Robeil Lews 
Irvine Smith of Pasadena, the news having 
been told at a tea at the Williams summer 
home in Saratoga on Saturday afternoon. 

Mrs. Ruth Prior, daughter of Mr. and 

Mrs. James Knight Prior Jr.. and Chester 
Irving Williams of New York have cho-en 
September 7 for the date of their wedding, 
which will take place in the afternoon at 
Trinity Church. Dr. Harvey Hansen will 
read the marriage ceremony, which will be 
followed by a reception. After a honey- 
moon in the East the bridal couple wi'.i make 
their home in New York. 



Weddings 

-Mrs. Andrew J. MouiJer i? announcing 



the marriage of her daughter. Mrs. Louise 
M. Covode, to Harry Rodgers Smith, wh'ch 
took place in town several days ago. The 
bride is a member of one of the pioneer 
families of California. 

Harry Rodgers Smith is the son of Dr. 
Jerome Smith of Rochester, N Y. ?v'r. and 
Mrs. Smith will occupy the Charles Carter 
Nichols home on Divisadero Street during 



■*m&— 




139-153 GEARY ST. 

^rnar>t</Lpparel 
ron UUomen 
an 



idiry. 



1SS&S 



Stulc suvci Quality 
Without ExtpaVa^at\c<? 





I lie absence of the Nichols family, who are 
summering in Palo Alto. 
Mrs. Emma Builer Breenden and Fred- 
erick W. McNear were married Thursday, 
July 7, at a simple ceremony at the Hotel 
Linden at Los Gates, where the bride's 
mother, Mrs. Emma Butler, is passing the 
summer. On account cf the poor health o! 
Mrs. Butler, no elaboration marked the wed- 
ding. Mr. and Mrs. McNear !crt after the 
ceremony on a honeymoon journey to the 
Sierra, including a stay of <. fortnight or so 
at Wawona. 



Dinners 

Mr. and Mrs, Gailliard Stoney were 

hosts at dinner at their Jackson Street home 
on Saturday evening, complimenting Stephen 
1. Mather, who is visiting in California. 

On Saturday night Mrs. Flood arranged 

a surprise birthday dinner for her daughler, 
Miss Mary Emma Flood, at their beautiful 
home at Menlo Park. Mrs. Flood's house 
guests were: Mr. and Mrs. Newold Law- 
rence, Mr. and Mrs. Herman Phlegtr, Miss 
Helen Pierce, Miss Emily Merriman of Bal- 
timore, Richard McLaren, Barroll McNear, 
Edward Harrison and Gwyn Follis. Also 50 
other guests attended the dinner. 

Monday night Mrs. E. Dode, mother of 

Mrs. C. Augustus Spreckels, entertained her 
family at a dinner party to celebrate her 
birthday. The affair took place at the Dore 
home in San Mateo. 



Luncheons 

— — Mrs. H. F. Dutton entertained a party 
of seven at luncheon at Hotel St. Francis 
yesterday. Her guests were: Mrs. Thomas 
Eastland, Mrs. R. H. Smith. Mrs. Walter 
Martin, Mrs. George Pope, Mrs. Harry H. 
Scott, Mrs. D. C. Jackling and Miss Marion 
Zeile. 

Mrs. George T. Marye was hostess at a 

luncheon Sunday at her home in Burlingame, 
at which covers were laid for fifty-five. 

Mrs. Thomas J. Pearce, wife of Colonel 

Pearce, commanding officer at the Prpsidio, 
will entertain at luncheon for Mrs. William 
Mason Wright next Wednesday, July 20, at 
her quarters in the Presidio. 

Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels was hostess to 

her friends at a luncheon oarty at thp Bur- 
lingame Country Club Tuesday, Mrs. C. Au- 
gustus Spreckels being the guest of Honor. 

Miss Dorothy Meyer, the daughter of 

Mr. and Mrs. H. L. E. Meyer Jr., was hos- 
tess at an informal luncheon, entertaining 
on Monday afternoon at the Woman's Ath- 
letic Club. The guest of honor was Miss 
Llizabeth Campbell. 



Teas 



Rafael formed a setting for the tea at which 
Miss Barbara Beardsley entertained Tuesday 
afternoon for a large number of her sub- 
debutante friends. The affair was given in 
honor of Miss Kathleen Bradley. 



In and Out of Town 

Miss Leonora Armsby and her brother, 

George N. Armsby Jr., arrived a few days 
ago from New York and are visiting tiieir 
uncles, Mr. Gordon and Mr. Raymond Arms- 
by, at Burlingame. With their parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. George Armsby, they have lived 
in Washington and New York for the past 
four years. Mr. and Mrs. Armsby will re- 
main in the East this summer. 
Mrs. de St. Cyr, who has been at South- 
ampton, L. I., visiting her daughter, the 
Princess Miguel de Braganza, returned to 
her home in San Mateo on Sunday. 

Miss Jean Howard, daughter of Mr. 

and Mrs. Horace P. Howard, who has been 
visiting friends in Menlo and Palo Alto for 
the past week, returned Monday to her home 
on Broadway. Over the past week-end Miss 
Howard visited Mrs. William H. Taylor Jr. 
and her daughter. Miss Edna Taylor. Ear- 
lier in the week Miss Howard was a guest 
at the Frederick W. Kimble home in Palo 
Alto. 



Intimations 

The Russian Ambassador to Washing- 
ton, Boris Bakhmeteff, will arrive here this 
week and will be the guest of Mr. William 
H. Crocker at Burlingame. He will be in 
California several weeks and will be enter- 
tained by Mr. and Mrs. George 1 . Marye, 
Mr. and Mrs. George Pope and others at Bur- 
lingame. 

Mrs. George Riddell is paying her first 

visit to San Francisco in nine yea's and is 
with her aunt, Mrs. Robert S. Graves. She 
was formerly Miss Bessie Tilden, daughler 
of the late Mr. Joseph Tilden of this city. 

When in Santa Clara Valley, see the Val- 
ley from the scenic electric lines. 

Trolley trips start from San Jose or Palo 
Alto. 

PENINSULA RAILWAY CO. 

San Jose, Cal. 



Tk 



FOR 

Exdlaisnv© 
Em\ft®irtL>@niminin' 



@nflfe> 



lUannacment'of 

Halsey E. Manwaring 



The gardens and porches about the 

charming George P. Beardsley home in San 




California Advertiser /or July 16, 1921 



13 



and one of the original members o( the Bo- 
hemian Club. Mrs. Riddell has lived with 
her sister, Mrs. Orlando Bird Bidwell, in Vir- 
ginia and Baltimore since the death of Mr. 
Riddell. Mrs. Redmond Payne gave a lunch- 
eon Monday at her home in Los Altos for 
Mrs. Riddell and Mrs. Frederick Kellam 
will give a tea for her next week. 

Dr. Hubert E. Law, who, with Mrs. 

Law and their son, is visiting the latter 's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Warner, at 
the Casa Del Rey Hotel, was host at a re- 
cent birthday dinner party there. 

Charles A. Black, who has been in 

Washington and New York for the years 
during and since the war, will be here shortly 
to pass the midsummer weeks. 

The Swiss Minister at Washington, M. 

Peter, and Mme. Peter, are en route from 
the East to California, and will be here on 
Friday to visit Mr. and Mrs. George T. 
Marye at Burlingame. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Duncan and Mr. 

and Mrs. Corbett Moody and their children 
will be at Weber Lake for most of the 
month of August. 

— Mr. and Mrs. Harry Poett and their 
daughter, Miss Evelyn Poett, have sailed 
from New York for England. They will visit 
relatives there and will then travel on the 
continent for the remainder of the summer. 

— Mrs. Vernon Rood will come to San 
Francisco from Salt Lake City the latter part 
of the summer to visit her mother, Mrs. Curt- 
is Lindley. She and Mr. Rood have lived in 
Salt Lake since their marriage last year. 

— Letters from the Misses Folger, who 
went to Europe several weeks ago, tell of 
their interesting travels. They are now in 
Paris and are planning a visit to England. 
From England Mr. Ernest Folger and Miss 
Betty Folger will sail for home. Mrs. Folger 
and Miss Elena Folger will remain in Europe 
for several months longer. 

— Mr. and Mrs. A. King Macomber. who 
have been at their apartment in Paris for the 
last six or eight months, have moved to 
Deauville, where they have a chateau, and 
where they will pass the remainder of the 
summer. 

— Mrs. Edward C. O'Dea and her sister, 
Miss Mabel May, will leave on July 20 for 



"BEAUTY SALON"— 
THE POWDER PUFF— 

Now under New Management 

Hair restored to its natural color. 

Hair Dyeing and Bleaching. 

Katherine McNamara — Marcel Waver 

Inez Dere, formerly of the City of Paris 

212 Stockton St. Suite 305 

Phono Dour]' 



PROF. JOHN A. JACKSON 

Instructor of Slsimming 

TERMS 

Full Course $10.00 

Single Lesson $1.00. Six Lessons $5.00 

Lurlirte Baths, Bush & Lar^in Sis. 

Phone Franklin eu:t 



Cuba. They will visit there for a few days 

then sail for New York, where they will meet 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Rosseter. Mr. and 

Mrs. O'Dea are passing a few days at the 

vosseter farm near Santa Rosa. 



Affairs at the Fairmont 

Miss Ruby Virginia Hale gave a delightful 
Luncheon at the Fairmont on Saturday in 
the Gold Room. The color scheme being in 
black and gold Stanford colors. Miss Hale 
and most of her guests being members of the 
Kappa Alpha Theta of that University. The 
place cards were adorned with yellow bags 
tied in black ribbon and upon "letting the 
black cat out of the bag" the announce- 
ment of the engagement of Miss Hale to 
Oliver C. Field was announced. The bride 
to be was charming in a chic gown of navy 
taffeta her hat being a saucy affair to match 
the dress and adorned with pink roses. The 
guests who included: 

Misses Doris Johnston, Evelyn Johnston, 
Dorothy Walsh, Margaret Howard, Prudence 
Fisher, Lola Bellingall; Mrs. Melvin Price. 
Mrs. Weston Wilson, Carra Barnhart, Hazel 
Green, Nora Kreps, Margaret Robertson, 
Vera Boyd, Alberta Marx. Miss Hale is the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Hale well 
known in San Francisco society. The fami- 
ly make their home at the Fairmont in the 
winter and have a delightful country home 
where they spend the summer. 



VI N O B A R! 

The Brick with the Kick 

Make Your Own It 1» Simple 
Guaranteed not to ma^e Vinegar 

VINOBAR MFG. CO., San Francisco 

636-S8 WASHINGTON STREET 
Agent! Wanted 




FIREPROOF 

STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 

WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1636 Market St. 

Bet. Franklin and Gough 

Tel. Park 271 San Francisco 



^rTEKNOOK 



= r : J 



Hotel 
St. Francis 

Four to Six 
6KIENTAL SEtW.CE 



Uianaeo/MenuDail 



y 



.Music by 

ferdinand Stark's* 

Orchestra 

Thos. J. Coleman^TTlanaaer 



J. E. BIRMINGHAM 
* * * 


Main Corridor 

» * * 


PALACE HOTEL 

* * * 


Opposite Rose Room 
* * * 


JEWELS 

* » # 


In Platinum 

* * * 


REMODELING 
* * * 


Old Styles Into New 
* * * 


UNIQUE DESIGNS 
* ♦ * 


Time-Keeping Watch 
* * * 


FINE JEWELRY 

♦ * * 


Of All Descriptions 
* * * 


EXPERT 


Repair Work 



ELECTROLYSIS 

Eye-brows arched and motes, warts and su- 
perfluous hair permanently removed by my 
latest improved multiple needle machine. 
Work guaranteed. 

MADAM STIVER 

133 Geary St.. Whitney Building. Suite 723 

Phone Douglas 5232 

Oakland. First Nat. Bank Bldg. 

Suite 424. Phone Oakland 2521 



rYork 



I nmf'l 



P.rii 



A TREATMENT FOR THE SCALP 

AND HAIR. Scientifically correct, cosme- 
tically perfect, established and conducted by 
American Hospital Nurses, unqualifiedly en- 
dorsed and used by Eminent Physician,. 

THE FRANCES FOX INSTITUTE 

For the Scientific Care of the Hair 

S«i» 506 Crocket Buldui Phooe Satler 51 18 

Al Market ot Port ?t» S«a Frascaco 



14 



San Francisco News Letter and 



^tornohjh 




Ford Company Making Records 

After shattering records for 1921 with a 
production of 4,322 cars and trucks in one 
day, the Ford Motor Co. began mapping out 
a schedule for July that will, officials say, 
establish not only average daily but monthly 
records at the plant, with an output of ap- 
proximately 10 cars every minute. To be 
exact, the July schedule, basing calculations 
on an eight-hour working day, calls for a car 
every six and one-half seconds, approximate- 
ly 600 cars every hour, or 4,800 daily. 



Risky Investment 

One who pursues the delicate avocation 
of giving free advice to investors through 
the columns of a daily newspaper, has been 
asked his opinion of a certain automobile 
slock that has been industriously peddled out 
to clerks and mechanics, and which is a high- 
ly promising .proposition — only that, and as 
yet nothing more. The stockholders' friend 
replies to the inquiry as follows: 

"This is a time when the established motor 
manufacturers are fighting for their lives, 
and we think that'investment in a new com- 
pany is assuming more risk than a prudent 
investor cares for, as a rule. After this com- 
pany gets to making and marketing cars at 
a profit in a highly competitive and over- 
crowded field it will be time to consider it as 
an investment. Until then it is highly 
speculative." 



Dealers Assured Protection 

Persons holding lawful liens on automo- 
biles seized and sold by the government be- 
cause they are used in the transportation of 
liquor, are protected in their equity under a 
decision handed down by Federal Judge Tul- 
tle recently in the East. The ruling was 
made under the recent decision of the United 
States Supreme court that the Volstead law 
took precedence over all other statutes in re- 
lation to liquor. 

The decision is important because it is the 
first time an interpretation has been placed 
on the penalty clause in this district which 
is a center for smuggling from Canada. In 
the future not only will the dealers equity 
be protected but the owner of an automo- 
bile taken without his consent and used later 
in rum running will have the vehicle return- 
ed to him. 



Durant Price Is Set 

That general phrase, "less than nine hun- 
dred dollars," behind which those close to 
the new Durant car have taken refuge in 
speaking of the car's price, has been made 
definite. Private opinion that the car would 
sell at $980, as has always been given with 



the reservation that the final cost figures 
might permit a further reduction or require 
a lesser margin under the nine-hundred 
mark, and earlier disclosure of the real price 
therefore rendered valueless. The price, 
however, was disclosed last week as that 
named tentatively in contracts which are 
being sent out to the trade, and is regarded 
therefore as settled. It is known also that 
plans for production contemplate an initial 
rate of 90,000 vehicles, to be divided among 
the three plants that will produce this car. 
The Durant Motor Co. of New York, Long 
Island City, is to build 25.000; the Durant 
Motor Co. of Michigan, at Lansing, will have 
a capacity of 40,000; and the Durant Mo- 
tor Co. of California, at Oakland, is to be 
responsible for another 25,000. This will 
be an important addition to our growing list 
of California industries. 



Gasoline Stock Increasing 

That the country's stock of gasoline is 
still increasing is indicated by preliminary 
figures given out by the United States Bu- 
reau of Mines which show that there were 
on May 31, 808.551,519 gallons of gasoline 
on hand at refineries in the United States. 
I his is an increase of 61,328,619 gallons 
over the figures for April 30, at which time 
it was announced that the largest supply of 
gasoline on record was on hand. The larg- 
est increase of stocks during May was in the 
Oklahoma and Kansas division, amounting to 
21.088,059 gallons. In the Indiana and Illi- 
nois division there was a decrease of 1 ,040,- 
270 gallons. 



Lamp Reflectors 

In order to prevent the silvering of lamp 
reflectors from tarnishing when not in use it 
is good to give the surface a light coating 
of alcohol in which collodion has been dis- 
solved. This will form an excellent protec- 
tion and is easily washed off with warm 
water. 



Locating Squeaks 

Squeaks are sometimes a hazardous un- 
dertaking to locate. A body resting on the 
frame unevenly will in most instances cause 
a cracking sound. By placing strips of leath- 
er between body and frame (preferably 
where body bolts pass through frame) it 
often overcomes this noise. A rubbing or 
lattling noise can most frequently be attri- 
buted to the edges of doors rubbing against 
their frames. This is often the result of the 
body sagging in the center and can be re- 
medied by placing a shim of the required 
thickness under the body bolt on the •side 
where the door rattles. It sometimes hap- 



pens that a door will bind or stick; this is 
due from practically the same cause. In the 
latter instance, however, the body may be 
shimed too high on either side, and by re- 
moving a certain amount of shiming it may 
overcome the trouble. 



Use of Sponge 

Rubbing with sponges and chamois should 
be done in straight lines rather than in cir- 
cles. To prevent water drying and spotting, 
it is well to clean one panel at a time. Avoid 
applying chamois, and especially the sponge, 
with any great pressure, and do not rub 
after surface is dry. 



Do Not Drive in Ruts 

Driving in ruts is not only bad for the 
tire, but it is equally bad for the highway. 
It is only the lazy driver that "sticks" in the 
luts rather than being awake and on his 
guard to avoid them. 

Continued driving in one line or spot 
quickly eats through the top dressing of the 
macadam road and wears a hole or rut in 
the body of the best road. This is a difficull 
damage to patch, without renovating almost 
the entire roadway, and motorists should be 
glad to cooperate to this extent in keeping 
good the better highways. 



A Retarded Spark 

Don't drive on a retarded spark! This is 
cne of the most prolific causes of engine 
overheating. The cause is obvious, the ex- 
plosion takes place when a maximum of the 
cylinder wall is uncovered instead of the 
minimum, as is the case when the ignition 
takes place at the upper dead centre, the 
piston being at the top of its stroke. By 
keeping this in mind the car owner will 
lengthen the life of his engine. 



How to Prolong Car's Life 

Squeaking of the brakes is usually due to 
uneven friction. The gripping effect should 
be adjusted equally around the brake drum. 

Sudden changes in temperature hurt the 
car's finish. Heat in the garage should be 
kept uniform. 

Drain the carburetor frequently to draw 
off water and all foreign matter. 

Keep oil off the motor. It gathers dirt. 

Prevent blowouts by avoiding severe jolts 
f.nd maintaining full pressure. 



They Learn Fast These Days — Teacher — 
Now, can any of you tell me which is the 
most dangerous part of an automobile? Tom- 
my (who walks to school) — Yes, ma'am; 
the driver! 

So Different — Nowadays the job of paint- 
ing up the town must be done in water-col- 
ors. — Notre Dame Juggler. 



Novelty in Storage Batteries 

A sulphuric acid jelly which will not crys- 
talize is a welcome invention. Charles E. 
luberg of Philadelphia has perfected a jelly 
electrolyte to take the plpce of the liquid 
fu'phuric acid electrolyte in slon.<;e batteries. 
It will keep moist for years without I;ip ad- 
dition of water, and preserxes both the lead 
plates and the separators. It prevents sul- 
phation. 



California Advertiser for July 16, 1921 



15 



The Balri-Jel made under the trade mark 
"J-E" is proving very successful. It eli- 
minates 'expensive battery troubles, is non- 
ccrroding and non-sulphating, and does not 
have to be removed from the car or boM 
when in storage. Though left idlo for months 
ii will remain fully charged and not run 
down when not in use. it is recharged in 
the same manner as any l<"ad plate battery 
and turns the life of a storage battery from 
months into years. 



Snapshots of the Heart 

Recent discoveries have shown that the 
X-rays can pass through steel and iron, and 
many engineering firms are using the X-rays 
to photograph flaws in the castings of im- 
portant parts of machinery. 

This new work has been made possible 
by the wonderful X-ray tube invented by 
Dr. Coolidge, which gives out immensely 
powerful rays that can pass through four 
inches of steel plate. 

Now another wonderful invention has 
been described to the Roentgen Society of 
England. It is a new photographic plate 
twenty times as sensitive to the X-rays as 
the plates ordinarily used, and is likely to 
levolutionize X-ray work, as it will make it 
possible to take snap-shot photographs of the 
heart, the lungs, or, indeed, any part of the 
body, and even cinematograph "radio- 
graphs" showing the heart beating, or the 
lungs at work breathing. 

Only a few years ago it took half an hour 
to photograph the thicker parts of the hu- 
man body with the X-rays; with the new in- 
vention a small fraction of a second will suf- 
fice. 



Spiders as Weather Prophets 

There is a wealth of weather wisdom to be 
got from the observation of spiders. 

These insects can not spin properly in a 
high wind. Before a gale they may be ob- 
served strengthening their webs. 

The shape of the web is also a valuable 
indication. When the frame-lines are short 
and stout the insect's instinct has told it that 
wind and rain are coming, while long and 
slender frame-lines are a reliable sign of 
calm and fine weather. 

If spiders remain active during rain you 
may be certain it is only a shower and will 
be over soon. When, at the beginning of 
rain, they retire into complete indolence, the 
unsettled weather will almost certainly last 
for some time. The lime of day at which 
spiders mend their nets is also a good weath- 
er sign. If the mending is observed going 
on during a summer evening there will be no 
rain that night. When spiders are seen 
crawling on walls instead of attending to 
their nets wet weather is imminent. 



The Scared Admirer 
Married twice previously, first to an archi- 
tect and then to an actor, the marriage be- 
ing annulled in each case, Pauline Frederick, 
the cinema actress, is to marry again, this 
time to a millionaire. I do not think it is 
generally known that this popular movie act- 
tress acted in many plays — farces and dra- 



mas — on the legitimate stage before she took 
up film work. 

In one of these, "Joseph and His Breth- 
ren," she appeared as Potiphar's wife. In 
the play, of course, she wore her hair down, 
supplementing it with a long wig which 
reached below her waisl. One day an ad- 
mirer begged an interview for two seconds. 

It was a hot afternoon, and as the visitor 
was admitted to her dressing room, Pauline's 
hand went unconsciously to her head. It 
came down with the glorious hair held in its 
clutches. Her visitor gasped, grasped his 
hat, and fled. 

"It was a tragic disillusion," said Miss 
Frederick, laughingly. 



A Hot Race— In Texas they still tell the 
story of the Englishman who imported a fa- 
mous wolfhound from Europe in order to 
gain wealth by catching wolves, for which 
the state paid a bounty of $10 a head. 
When the dog came he invited some dyed- 
in-the-wool Texans to see the first chase. Be- 
fore long a wolf was sighted, the dog was 
freed from his leash, and the chase was on, 
but though the party wandered mile after 
mile they found no trace of either the dog 
or the wolf. Finally they reached a clear- 
ing where a native was chopping wood, and 
the Britisher cried: "I say, old chap, did 
you see a wolf and a hound pass bv here?" 
"Sure did. They just passed." "And how 
was the race?" "Pretty hot, stranger; but 
the dog was a little bit ahead." 



Slow Repast — A well known English writ- 
er visiting in this country attended a dinner 
given by a hostess whose hospitality is no- 
toriously inadequate. Her dinners have 
often been referred to as "samples," and in- 
vitations to them are not accepted with 
alacity the second time. This dinner was 
the usual inadequate kind. It served merely 
as an appetizer to the hungry Englishman, 
and when the coffee was served, indicating 
that the dinner was at an end. his evident 
dissatisfaction was amusing to the other 
guests. The hostess did not notice it. how- 
ever, and said to him amiably: "Now do 
tell me when we may expect the pleasure of 
having you dine with us again?" "Immedi- 
ately, madam, immediately." was the un- 
expected reply. 



Max — Smith's speech on prohibition was 
fine, wasn't it? Pax — Yes. he can always 
make a dry subject interesting. — Judge. 

She — Enthusiasm is contagious. He — 
Not always. I've courted girls who didn't 
seem to share my enthusiasm in the least. — 
Boston Transcript. 

Husband — The doctor has ordered me to 
observe the greatest possible quiet. Help- 
mate — In that case, dear, don't you think 
it would be an ideal time to get back into 
business? — Paris L'lllustration. 

Director — Have you ever been in any am- 
ateur theatricals or takci lessons in acting? 
Applicant — I'm sorry to say I haven't. Di- 
rector — Thank heavens' I'll give you an 
immediate try-out. — Rim Fun. 



Said one wife to another: "Oh, really, 
darling, husbands are such impossible crea- 
tures!" And the Other equally fed-up darling 
returned: "No, dear; the trouble is that 
they're so possible." — London Sketch. 

Railroad King — What do you think I 
need, doctor, to set me up again ? Doctor — 
Well, I think a little iron will help you. 
Railroad King — Good! I gobbled up a whole 
railroad system last week. — Homeopathic 
Recorder. 

Algy — Parker, I'm ruined socially! Last 
night at the ball I drank too much and stag- 
gered into everybody. Valet — Scarcely that, 
sir. Every one's talking of you as inventing 
a new dance. — London Passing Srow. 

Husband (angrily) — What! No supper 
ready? That is the limit! I'm going to a 
restaurant. Wife — Wait just five minutes. 
Husband — Will it be ready then? Wife — 
No, but then I'll go with you. — Minneapolis 
Journal. 

"Are you sure you can prove my client is 
crazy?" "Why, certainly," replied the emi- 
nent alienist. "And what is more, if you 
are ever in trouble and need my services I'll 
do the same thing for you." — Birmingham 
Age-Herald. 

"Dearest. I love you. Since the dawn of 
creation, since the birth of this world, since 
the beginning of time, I have known and 
loved you. Darling, will you be mine." 
"Oh. Tom. this is so sudden." — Dartmouth 
Jack-o'-Lantern. 



Two Views of It — "Success is making 
money." 'No; success is keeping what you 
make." 





"The House of Quality" 


GOLD1 




Block & McDonald, Prop*. 


Service 


Supreme Home Cooking 




Prices Reasonable 




172 EDDY STREET 


Visit 


them after the shoi» and meal times 



BERGEZ-FRANK/S 

Old Poodle Dog 

Luncheon 75c 

Served Daily— 11 to 2 

Choose full-sized portions from large menu, 

which is changed every day. 

Excellent Food— Beautiful Environment 

Prompt Set-rice 

French Dinner $1.50 

Including i»x. week d*r* «nd Sunday?, 5 lo 9 P. M. 

DANCING 



42 



BL SH JT . ABOVF- KEARNY 
■Vac Dowlas 2411 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. lo 9 p. m. 

Gus' Fashion 

The MOST POPULAR RESTAURANT 

65 Post Street. Near Market Street. 
Phone Kearny 4536 San Franciico, Calif. 

Meals Served a ta Carte. Also Regular- 
French and Italian Dinners. 

FISH AND CAME A SPECIALTY 



San Francisco News Letter and 




PL/EASURJlVS wand 

"Obey no wand but pleasure's — Tom Moore. 




tois^ca 



Midget at Orpheum 

Here they are again! The talented little 
people who run the gamut of human accom- 
plishments and make us wonder while we 
smile. Dancing and singing and acting all 
become something different when done by 
ihese tiny folk, and the arrangement of their 
elaborate act is a masterpiece of stagecraft. 
"The Chili King" occasions much mirth and 
applause, as George Austin Moore, the come- 
dian, knows how to sway his audience with 
song and anecdote. Edward Marshall is 
clever with his bits of chalk and does some 
striking caricatures while we wait. "A Trip 
to Hitland" remains, and is. the most popu- 
lar part of the program with the tune-loving 
portion of the audience. 



Alcazar's Bright Comedy 

Little Miss Gladys George, the Alcazar 
new leading lady and a young person of 
beauty and charm, must NOT say "Mom- 
mer." We are an indulgent audience at the 
Alcazar, an appreciative one and an enthu- 
siastic one at times; we make the best of 
everything and everybody and do r.o! hesi- 
tate to welcome our favorites. But we will 
not stand for "Mommer." Otherwise Miss 
George has made a decided and immediate 
hit with us; she is delightfully r>retty and 
has no end of dear little ways all her own. 
In the present play,"Mamma's Affair." she 
has a part well suited to her gifts, and Dud- 
ley Ayres is also well cast as the clever 
young physician; his bedside manner is so 
nerfect it must be his very own. Anna Mac- 
N?ughton always makes good: she has that 
sift of gifts in an actress — of putting per- 
sonality into a commonplace part. Chatterton 
and Chapman are serviceable. Leslie Virden 
does a remarkably good bit of work as the 
nervous mother, and Blanche Douglas is 
handsome and vocally agreeable, with strong 
dramatic possibilities. 



California 

The screen has a few bright lights, that's 
certain. While "Salvage" does not give Miss 
Frederick the oooortunitv to display her tal- 
ent as did "Madame X." the nlav is wholly 
satisfactory and leaves us with onlv the one 
desire — to see more productions of this cali- 
ber. Other features are given, which round 
out the program. 



Irrmorial 

"The Woman God Changed" contains 
much of the onginal desoite r he S^-u'.h Sea 
Isle setting. The court room plainlv shows 
lhat the director has visited such a nlace at 
le-st enough times to know how a d'gnified 
'-caring should be conducted. Il is to be 
h^oed some of the local legal fraternity will 
five the picture the once over. The acting 
of t^e cast is very well balanced -no one 
outshining the others enough to be conspicu- 
ous. Seena Owen is pleasing both as the 



dance-hall girl and as the demure leformed 
woman. Severi gives a fine rendition of 
Samson and Delilah to balance the bill 



Columbia 

Always at a motion picture one can be 
sure of poetic justice triumphing in the end. 
If it were not for this consoling thought, 
one could hardly bear the poignant pressure 
upon one's emotions in the wonderful pic- 
ture' "Over the Hill." now showing ^t the 
Columbia Theatre. The play is constructed 
on Will Carllon's rhyme-drama and makes 
a strong and affecting film. There is noth- 
ing subtle about it, and certainly nothing is 
left to the imagination; the elemental emo- 
tions are played upon until they give way, 
snd all over the theatre are heard the rack- 
ing sobs of strong men and the weeping of 
lender women. Mary Carr portrays the 
mother with heart-reaching gentleness and 
lovable chaim. The other characters are all 
excellent and the picture is a monument of 
screening skill. 



Alcazar New Bill 

An attraction of extreme interest is an- 
nounced bv the Alcazar, beginning with the 
Sunday afternoon performance, July 1 7th. 
when Booth Tarkington's fun classic of 
vouth. "Penrod." will be produced for the 
first time in San Francisco. Sharing the 
leading honors with Gladys George and Dud- 
ley Avres will be a clever iuvenile actor of 
considerable experience. Charles Metcalfe, 
ten years oM. who will appear in the title 
role. In addition to voung Metcalfe, who 
is considered one of the cleverest child act- 
ors in America, three other youngsters are 
needed in the cast. The story is not only of 
deep interest to grownups but should prove 
a treat for the children. Penrod is a pre- 
cocious vouth with a desire to be a detect- 
ive and he uncovers a real criminal in the 
course of his adventures. 



POWRY LECTURES 

John Cowper Powrys. the noted British 
orator and author, gave the first of a new 
series of lectures on Monday morning in the 
Red Room of Hotel Bellevue. to a most de- 
lighted audience of San rancisco's best rep- 
resentative people. 

It is in response to the urgent reouest of 
l^ose who attended his lectures last April 
that Powrys has returned to fill these pres- 
ent engagements. By all who hpve heard 
him he is regarded as one of the most stim- 
ulating speakers of the lecture platform to- 
day. 

His subject for the opening lecture was 
"luhus Caesar," and on Monday evening he 
sr>oke on "The Genius of Homer." Powys 
handled these topics in his usual brilliant 
style. 

Under the general subiect, "Great Per- 
sonalities," will be included lectures on Saint 



Paul, Dante, Abraham Lincoln, D'Annunzio, 
Joan of Arc and Queen Victoria. The sub- 
ject, "Influences That Have Made for Civ- 
ilization," will include lectures on "The Wis- 
dom of China," "The Jews and Their In- 
spiration," "The Contribution of Germany to 
the Civilization of the World," "Fr?.nce, or 
the Art of Life," "Russia, or the Unknown 
Future," and "England, or the Secret of In- 
dividualism." 

These lectures, which will continue every 
Monday and Friday at 1 1 a. m. and 8.15 p. 
m. during July and August, are under the 
management of Jessica Colbert. 



TOUCHES THE HEART 

The "Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse," 
which is the screen sensation of the year, 
is drawing enormous houses to the Curran 
theater twice a day. It was expected that 
this adaptation of the story by Vicente In- 
gram Ibanez would be enormously success- 
ful, but its reception exceeds all bounds; 
every scene is fascinating but the picture of 
the cemetery arouses the deepest sentiment. 
The feelings of all who suffered the loss of 
deal ones in the war are aroused to such 
an extent that many spectators depart in 
Pleasure's Wand 



PERENNIALLY POPULAR 

At Cafe Marquard, San Francisco's Paris- 
ian cafe of reputation, they are featuring 
the smartest show in town, with Miss Lav- 
inia Winn, the popular operetta comedienne, 
as star. The Summerland Revue introduces 
ail the melody masters, "adept artists at syn- 
copation." It would be difficult anywhere to 
find a cafe which has more features to please 
patrons, than Cafe Marquard, with its dinners 
de luxe at $2.50, its Continental luncheons 
at 90 cents, business men's luncheon at 75 
cents, and its elaborate a la carte service and 
after-theatre supper. And then the dancing. 
It is easy to understand its perennial pop- 
ularity. 



SAN FRAMCISCO 



T*t Wtt W m yAuovnue 




I 



" A Ii,?v EES 25 ™ 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 
Except SaU., Suns, and Holiday! 

AND THE SAME GREAT SHOWS 



Smoking permitted in dress circle and 
loges. 



California Advertiser for July 9, 1921 



17 



NO CONFIDENCE IN TURKEY 

Despite the changes, the Turk is at heart 
extremely conservative and it would be 
wrong to conclude that Turkish Family life 
has reached the Christian standard. Even 
in a household where the wife may enjoy li- 
berties, there is still the lack of real spiritual 
communion which exists between American 
husbands and wives. Although the women 
of wealthy families are exceedingly well edu- 
cated, the men look for intellectual com- 
panionship exclusively among members of 
their own sex; and often the women find 
themselves no more than toys and play- 
things. 

The conservatism of the Turk also shows 
itself in commercial and official life. Need- 
less to say, the Turk does not use a type- 
writer, and he also disdains a desk. When 
he wishes to write a letter, he takes paper 
in hand, literally, and, beginning at the right 
edge, rapidly covers the sheet with strange 
hieroglyphics. Turkish officials sign all do- 
cuments with a cachet, which contains the 
signature and the date. 

For many generations the Turks have been 
so busy fighting that they have left all trad- 
ing in the hands of Greeks, Armenians and 
that motley group known as "Levantines." 
Strictly speaking, a Levantine is any foreign- 
er born in Turkey. An American business 
man receives a rude shock on attempting lo 
transact business in the Levant. To begin 
with, he must discard all idea of confidence, 
the foundation upon which the entire com- 
mercial structure in the United States rests. 
In business transactions it is dangerous, and 
almost invariably ruinous, to accept any 
statement as true. No transaction can be 
completed without long negotiation, even if 
it be nothing more than the purchase of a 
can of sardines at the corner grocery. Hag- 
gling is everywhere the rule. There is as 
wild a clamor in bank offices to obtain a fa- 
vorable exchange rate as there is in making 
a purchase at a bazaar. Naturally, business 
conducted under such conditions is long and 
tedious. 



TODDLING AT TECHAU'S 

All New York is "Toddling." according to 
latest reports from the Eastern metropolis. 
All San Francisco is "Toddling." too, and 
dance enthusiasts elect Techau Tavern be- 
cause Elliston Ames and the famous Techau 
Tavern Orchestra are nlaying the latest New 
York dance hits, including the popular "Once 



in a Blue Moon" and "Spread Your Stuff," 
with a jazz that is simply irresistible. 

The lively Girl Revue presents entertain- 
ing interludes between dances, and an added 
attraction is the feature of "Lucky" dances 
awarded by prizes of Melachrino cigarettes 
and Miss Saylor's chocolates. 



A Blue Sunday — In Scotland observance 
of the Sabbath is very strict, and manual la- 
bor on that day is looked on with horror. 
One Sunday the good wife of Jock was hor- 
rified to hear a great knocking in the gar- 
den. Going out, she found her husband 
hamemring away at a barrow behind the 
trees. "Ma gudeness, Jock," said she, "what 
are ye doing? Don't ye know it's the Saw- 
bath?" "Aye," replied Jock, "but I'm be- 
hind the trees and I must knock the nails 
in." Said his better half, "Hist, mon! why 
dinna ye use screws?" 



Jolly Army Affair. 

Fort Mason's "Hard Times" party, in the 
post cafeteria, was a jolly affair. Indeed, 
so puzzling was the identity of certain fa- 
miliar figures, in costume, that it might al- 
most be called a masquerade. Those two 
affable officers. Colonel Bigelow and Colonel 
Knight, respectively post commander and 
Quartermaster chief, acted as hosts to all of 
their present sadly depleted staff and many 
of its former members. It was the last "fifty 
per cent" reduction of personnel which sug- 
gested ten term "Hard Times" on the invi- 
tations issued, and the added request that no 
one present should appear without "patch- 
es." So faithfully was the edict followed 
that this gathering was the merriest of all the 
parties given. Only Colonel Knight's unfail- 
ing "West Point" bearing betrayed him in 
his unfamiliar dress of torn overalls, rough 
boots, shabby shirt and soiled "cow-boy" hat. 
The prizes fell to Miss Bridge, pretty even 
in her absurd "Sis Hopkins" disguise, and 
Mr. Reinhart. whose black wig. theaterically 
"missing" front teeth and unspeakable cor- 
duroys, kept him a stranger to his closest 
associates until the close of the evening. 



WANTED — By lady of refinement and social 
education, a position as chaperon for a 
motherless girl in gentleman's home. 
Address Box T. News Letter. San Fran- 
cisco. 



>i».iiiin.r KiMitTiii it<-*MTvt. Syateai umi laaoetateal Sarrbafja Bauaka at * :,n 1'rnncUro 

The San Francisco Savings & Loan Society 



Sn\ Inga 



26 i 



Tin: * V \ I'll INCISI I" IIAXK 
lil.ntiin Strveti »an I->:inrl*rn. I :il. 



I nmmrrclnl 



Mlaalan llrnnvh. Mission and 
Park-PrraUlo nuiri.i Hraaea, 

U:iiiilu Mre«'t Itrnnch. Haighl and 1- 

.u MB :n>ih. insi 

laaeta * Ti.ss:t.i.'ii.i i Capital Letaally PaW iv IMIMIIN 

Dvpoalta ■7,T*zV*S1.14 RrHirr mil Cnilicl F**a... MMLMtVM 

I iii|ili>vrt'«' 1'i-n.ii.n I Ti ml !W,7.l".'*.~. 

OFFICERS 

- 
and Cashier: t: T. k ' 
l\ M WILLIAM HEW 

H. A I U'RNSTKIN 
Branch; « li.> District Branch: 

asrer Hatsrhl inch. 

nu \iiii ••! niKKi pons 
JOHN A BVCK GEO. TOL'RNV. E T K WALTER. 

HUGH Ol 

CHRISTEK DFELLOV neral 

Attorn 



Clever Girl Revue 

An entertainment that no out of town 
guests are allowed to miss is an evening 
spent at Techau Tavern. The highly effi- 
cient service and perfect cuisine make it the 
favorite dining place as well as the first 
choice for after-theatre parties. Those wish- 
ing to entertain their guests and at the same 
time show them the attractions that are most 
typical of San Francisco never fail to include 
this popular cafe. 

The clever girl revue, whose numbers are 
changed weekly, afford colorful and amus- 
ing diversion, while all San Francisco knows 
that Techau Tavern has the best dancing 
floor in town and the finest of jazz orches- 
tras. 

"Lucky" dances with prizes of Melachrino 
cigarettes and Miss Saylor's chocolates are 
a feature that appeals to the dancers. 



Gentlewomen — 

Jl trade that is of 

great importance: 

THE CARE OF THE HAIR 
THE CARE OF THE FACE 
THE CARE OF THE NAILS 

Hairdressing 
tM.arce\ing 

Cosgroves Hair Store 

Established 25 yean 

360 Geary Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone: KEARNY 3842 



{Berkeley Store: 2331 Telegraph Ave. 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

INSURANCE BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 



Summer Winds 

Mean Parched Skin 

unless you use 

COSGROVE'S 
VIOLET MASSAGE CREAM 

Sold under an absolute guarantee. 

Use a jar — if you don't like it for any reason, 
return jar and get money back. 



Cosg 



SOLD BY 

rove's HairStore 

Established 25 Years 



360 Geary Street 

Kearnv Francisco 

Berkeley Store 2331 Telegraph 



18 




LONE RANCHWOMAN'S JOURNAL 

The title of "The Desert and the Rose" 
causes one to imagine the book is a romantic 
tale of the frontier, but in reality the work 
makes no pretense at all to fiction. It is a 
frank and a very interesting retrospect of 
many incidents that came under the author's 
notice when ranching in New Mexico, and 
dealing with types of help in which most Am- 
ericans would have had small confidence. 

The author went to the dry and sunny 
climate of Southern New Mexico for the 
benefit of her health and located in the Mes- 
illa Valley, forty miles north of El Paso, 
Texas. Having purchased a good ranch, 
she had the usual needs of labor and thus 
came into communication with the peons, 
< nd other varieties of ranch inhabitants who 
live close to Mexico, and exude the charac- 
teristics of the hybrid Latin population. 

The different types are depicted as if by 
the skill of a talented artist. One can im- 
agine the sort of men and women and girls 
she met, and let it be said that her comments 
are far more to the credit of those working 
types than the ill repute. She cheerfully 
says good words of all who deserved praise. 

Though unfamiliar with the methods of 
farming under irrigation and physically 
handicapped by her rheumatism, the author 
realized annually a fair amount on her in- 
vestment. She succeeded "by ceaseless 
mental rather than physical application." 
Her book imparts a good many useful bits 
of information. Published bv the Cornhill 
Company, Boston. Price $1.50. 



DICKENS GREATEST OF ALL WRITERS 

Archibald Marshall, who has a record of 
twentv years as a successful novelist and is 
considered by English literary critics as the 
"successor to Anthony Trollope," declares 
that Dickens is the greatest of all writers. 
Expressing his preference in a New York 
Times interview, Mr. Marshall said: 

"I read Dickens all the time. Thackeray 
I read occasionally; Hardy, a good deal; a 
lot of Kioling. Every few years I read Mark 
Twain's 'Huckleberry Finn' through. It is a 
great book by a great author. I like Con- 
rad verv much and know him personally. 
Dear old Henrv James I have read constant- 
ly. I used to be a neighbor of his at Rye." 

Mr. Marshall began writing about the 
same time as Gilbert K. Chesterton and re- 
members when that rotund author was sing- 
ularly thin. 



SARCASM IS DANGEROUS 

"The fact seems to be," declares the New 
York Times, "that the world does not take 
kindlv to flattering glass of satire. Dickens 
was long under the ban of proud Britons 
who could not abide it that he neglected neo- 
ple of their own station and took his char- 
acters out of the ash boxes. They read An- 
thony Trollope instead." 



A SMOKING CENTENARIAN'S RECOL- 
LECTIONS 

Washington Bissell of Great Barrington, 
retired New York lawyer, who is 101 years 
old. says smoking has helped to prolong his 
life. "I have smoked and smoked." said 
Mr. Bissell on his birthday, "and it never 
seemed to hurt me. In fact, I think it has 
helped me to live and enjoy life for more 
than a century." 

He recalls having heard John Quincy 
Adams making a campaign soeech at Ro- 
chester in 1825. Adams was the whig can- 
didate against Andrew Jackson. "A short 
stocky man with a big voice and dressed in 
a black broadcloth suit," is the centenarian's 
description. The old man saw, in 1841. at 
Rochester, the funeral of President Wm. 
Henry Harrison. General Winfield Scott 
commanded the large military escort. Scott 
was six and one-half feet tall and looked like 
a giant. 



■aWS/SAVS////M/s//A'////////////yy///////s///////ssss///M?ss/s/. 



SUNBEAMS 

Guarding Her Reputation — Mob Leader — 
Can we swing these horse thieves on a 
branch of your apple tree, ma'am? Lady — 
Sir. I'm a spinster lady; and I can't have 
any men hanging around my house. 



Indefinite — When a woman 'phones her 
husband that she will see him about five, he 
doesn't know whether she means dollars or 
o'clock, but he surmises that it's both. 



Par'adox — You can buy cord at a cordage 
sale, but you can't buy rum at a rummage 
sale. 



As It Goes — Tall — George seems to have 
recovered from the iilting his old girl gave 
him. Short — Yes. he's been revamped. — Pitt 
Panther. 



One at a Time, Please — Professor— What 
is ratio? 

Student — Ratio is proportion. 

Professor — What is proportion? 

Student — Proportion is ratio. 

Professor — But what are ratio and pro- 
portion? 

Student — I can only answer one question 
■it a time. — The Villanovan. 



Quite True — "You can't iudge Deople by 
their names." "Is that so?" "One might 
think from the name that a grass widow was 
green." — Lafayette Lyre. 



The Chilly One— "Cold, dear? Bout 

to freeze." "Want m' coat, dear?" "No, 
just the sleeves." — Oregon Orange Owl. 



Undue Familiarity — Cop (Angrily to fair 
motorist) — The nixt time ye don't stop at 
me signal, I'll pinch ye! Fair Motorist (col- 
oring) — Sir! How dare you! 



To Avoid the Rush — "Last evening, sir, I 
distinctly ,^aw my daughter sitting in your 
lop. What explanation have you to make?" 
"1 got here early, sir — before the others." 



Beneficial — "Since the prohibition law 
went into effect, I notice that your husband 
is home every night. Aren't you glad?" 
"Not at all. He's always in the kitchen, 
making beer or something." 



His Reason — Rastus — So's yo gwine to 
line de army. Why don't yo jine the navy 



instead? Sambo — Niggah, 
fastah than Ah can swim. 



Ah 



can run 



Too True — Screen Actress — I have a cer- 
tificate from my doctor saying that I can 
not act today. Manager — Why did you go 
to all that trouble. I could have given you 
a certificate saying that you never could act. 
— Loew's Weekly. 



bab 



His Preference — She — Are you fond of 



He— Ye 



:es, very. She — What age 
do you like them ? He — Oh, about eighteen 
or twenty! — Judge. 



Not Interested in Single Ones — "She says 
there isn't a single man she cares for." 
"That's right. She's always after some 
other woman's husband." — Judge. 



For that stubborn cough 
Use Old Snake Doctor's Cough Remedy 

SNAKE DRUG CO. 

Formerly G. Leipnilz 8i Co. 

Now Located at 

127-129 KEARNY ST. 



FACIAL DEFECTS 
Crooked Noses, Lines of Age, Etc. 

(Facial Reconstruction) 

H. EARLE COGER, A. M. 

797 Bush St. Office Hours I to 4 

ban Francisco Phone Sutler 3617 



San Francisco Law School 

Third Floor Call Building 

Evening Senium for Men £*f Women, 7:30 to 9:30 

Applications for enrollment are being received now 

Classes convene Uonday, September 12 1921 

Write Today lor Catalogue 



PENINSULAR PATRONAGE SOLICITED 



POST-TAYLOR GARAGE, Inc. 

530 TAYLOR ST. 



Washing and Greasing Cars 
in a careful and efficient manner 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



Bank of New South Wales 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of Pro- 
prietors 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Aggregate Assets. 30th 
Sept. 1920 




$24,655,500.00 
16,750,000.00 

24.655,500.00 



$362,338,975.00 



SIR JOHN RUSSELL FRENCH, K. B. E., General Manager 



357 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian States, New Zealand. Fiji, Papua (New 
Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of Australasian Banking 
Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged. 

Head Office: London Office: 

GEORGE STREET. SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET. E. C. 2 

Agents : 
Bank of California, National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bank, Crocker Nat'l Bank 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Member of the Federal Reserve System 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRES1DIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement and 7th Avenue 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

DECEMBER 31. 1920 

Assets $69,878,147.01 Capital Actually Paid Up $1,000,000.00 

Deposits 66,338.147.01 Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,540,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund $343,536.85 

OFFICERS 

IOHN A. BUCK. President 

GEO. TOURNY. Vice-Pres. and Manager A. H. R. SCHMIDT. Vice-Pres. and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSE. Vice-President A. H. MULLER. Secretary 

\VM. D. NEWHOUSE. Assistant Secretary 

WILLIAM HERRMANN. Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL. Assistant Cashier 

G A. BELCHER, Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN. Assistant Cashier 

C. W. HEYER, Manager Mission Branch W. C. HF.YER. Manager Park-Presidio Dist. Branch 

O. F. PAULSEN. Manager Haight Street Branch 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

JOHN A. BUCK E. T. KRUSE I. N. WALTER A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY A. H. R. SCHMIDT HUGH COODFELLOW E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. A. CHRISTENSON ROBERT DOLLAR L. S. SHERMAN 

COODFELLOW. EELLS. MOORE & ORRICK. General Attorneys 



BOND DEPARTMENT 

THI ANGLO AND LONDON PARIS 

NAIIONAL BANK 



Su l-r and San«ome S'rects 
Phone Ke-'"y 5j^.O 
S*n hrancis^o, Cal I. 



RECOMMENDS 

IRRIGATION DISTRICT BONDS 

FOR INVESTMENT 

THEY ARE more secure than first mortgages because they rank ahead of 
first morgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT. 

Yield from 6 - to 634' 

Let us send voi< oi<r booklet THE IRRIGATION DISTRICT BOND 



THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE 

HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO. CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 Reseive Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 

STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptlv and at REASON \RLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and at LONDON. ENC: NEW YORK: 
PORTLAND. ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE. 450 CALIFORNIA STR ET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE. Manager W. J. COULTHARD. Assistant Manager 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



Normandie Garage 

Gough and Sutter Sts. 



Washing and Polishing Day and Night. 

Cars Oiled and Greased. 

Crank Cases Drained Free. 

Home Garage Trade Solicited. 



Fillmore 4815 



Old Hampshire Bond 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

The Standard Paper for Business Stationery. 
"Made a little heller than seems necessary." The 
typewriter paper* are sold in attraciive and durable 
boxes containing five hundred perfect sheets, plain 
or marginal ruled. The manuscript covers are sold 
in similar boxes containing one hundred sheets. 
Order through you, printer or stationer, or, if so de- 
sired we will send a sample book showing the entire 
line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

F Ma hi, shed 1855 

S7-45 FIRST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



BLANCO'S 

Farrell and Larkin Sts. 
Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without 

dining in the finest cafe in America 
Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner S1.75 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 

PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Office*— 505-507— 323 Geary Street 

Phone Douglas 2433 




THE BEAUTIFUL 

Hotel Manx 

Powell at O'Farrell: SAN FRANCISCO 



— Whether it is business or pleasure that 
brings you to San Francisco, you will 
find it to vour advantage to stav at this 
beautiful Hotel. <J Consider this a per- 
sonal invitation; we wnnt you to make 
the Hotel Manx your Home when vnu 
are here. <][ Attractive Summer Rates. 




oJC^-^^c 



fc C</CWX. 



MR. MANAGER: 



If you think it is warm, ask your Chef in the kitchen, who has 
it every day; he would like to make a few suggestions how to 
eliminate some of the excessive heat. 

Do you know that the Palace Hotel, Fairmont Hotel, Clinton Cafeteria and 
other large institutions have ALL GAS Kitchens? 

There Is a Reason — 



Contentment spells for better work and less waste. 

LET YOUR DEALER, OR WE WILL BE GLAD TO, TELL YOU HOW 
TO MAKE YOUR KITCHEN IDEAL AND SAVE MONEY AND WASTE 

Visit Our Industrial Gas Laboratory, 241 Stevenson St. 

Pacific Gas and Electric Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO DIVISION 445 SUTTER STREET 



■ P 



C 



Established July 20 1856 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



SATURDAY, JULY 23, 1921 



(Caltfornta AitaertiBfr 

$5.00 PER YEAR 








Let No Corn 

spoil one happy hour 



ANY corn ache nowadays is unfair to 
yourself. You can stop it by a touch. 
You can end the whole corn in short order. 

The way is Blue-jay — either liquid or 
plaster. One moment applies it, the next 
moment forgets it. The pain stops. Then 
the corn loosens and comes out. 

Blue-jay has done that to not less than 
20 million corns. 



It does it in the right, the gentle, the 
scientific way. Harsh treatments are un- 
necessary now. It is vouched for by this 
great laboratory, famous the world over. 

If you use wrong methods, cease them. 
If you pare corns, quit. There is now an 
ideal corn ender. It is saving millions of pain- 
ful hours. Ask your druggist for Blue-jay. 
Apply it tonight. It will end your dread of 
corns. 



L 



Plaster or Liquid 

Blue=jay 

The Scientific Corn Ender 

jllso Blue-jay Foot Soap Blue-jay Fool PowJet Blue-jay Foot Relief 

BAUER & BLACK Chicago New York Toronto 
Makers of B. & B. Sterile Surgical Dressing* and Allied Products 



Spend Your Vacation 

IN THE 

Beautiful Feather River Country 

THOUSANDS OF FERT ABOVE THE LEVEL OF 
THE SEA IN THE HEART OF THE SIERRAS 

Reached via 

WESTERN PACIFIC RAILROAD 

"The Feather River Route" 

— Numerous Resorts along the famous FEATHER RIVER and near the many 
lakes and streams where fish and gatne are abundant. 

WRITE FOR ILLUSTRATED FOLDERS 

ticket Offices: 50 POST STREET and FERRY BUILDING— Telephone Sutter 1651 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



The Largest Fire Insurance Company in America." 

FIRE AUTOMOBILE WINDSTORM 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



REASONABLE RATES 




J. B. CROWE 



3652 GEARY, at 1st Ave. 1055 Post St., at Polk 

PHONE FRANKLIN 7445 

GLAZING 
BEVELING 



AUTOMOBILE 
BUILDING 



Glass of All Kinds 



)<&$&$W&&$><&irt>&S>&&&&$Q^^ 



§>an iFrattriaro (Ehrontrle 









Leading Newspaper of th 


e Paci 


Fie Coast 








A 


N 


ewspaper 


made 


every 


day 








TO 


SPEAK 


TO 










Ever 


y 


member of 


every 


f ami 


ly 



Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for $1.15 a 

month including Sunday editions. 
Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or poslmaster. 



Juto 
Camp 
Comfort 
Outfit 




THE 
OUTFIT 

de luxe: 



AVh<-n purchasing' your camping outfit tin r- arc four esscnl 



COMFORT; second. CAPACITY'; third, COMPACTNESS; fourth, COST per person accommo- 
dated. The Auto Comfort outfit is more than a bed at night. It is a roomy camp home, 
It A IN or SHINE. Our Combination Cot makes a bed at night. Tabic Settee, MorrJii chair 



and .tending bed for day use. Our outfits accommodate from one to six people. Our 
sagging beds only weigh twenty-seven pounds. Send for literature and prices and we will 

fill your order direct if your dealer does not carry our g Is. Fours for comfort while 

camping'. 

THREE LEAF COT MFG. COMPANY, 

Sunnjvulc, Cnllfornlu. 



Manufacturers of Auto Camp Outfits, Folding- Tents. Beds, Chairs 
Dealers send for prices 



and Mattres 



PYR0-V0ID 

Dr. Hoagland's Home Treatment 
- for - 

PYORRHEA 

Package with full directions sent 
in plain wrapper for One Dollar 

Satisfaction Guaranteed or Money Refunded 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

Dental Specialist 

908 Market Street, at Powell 

San Francisco 

Dept. N. L. Established 1903 

SAVE YnUR TEETH 



An Ounce of Prevention is 
Worth Many Pounds of 
Ten - mile - from - no- 
where- regret. 

Let our expert automobile electricians 
inspect your starting, lighting and 
ignition systems regularly. It's the best 
insurance against a breakdown at an 
important moment. 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 

cMASTER eAUTOMOBILE SLECTRICMNS 
955 Post Street SAN FRANCISCO 



USE 

Associated Products 

"More Miles to the Gallon" 



Associated Oil Company 



Sharon Bldg. 



San Francisco 



We Stand for the Best in Business Training 




Si School 



Munson 



..for.. 

Private Secretaries 

600 SUTTER ST. FRANKLIN 306 

Bend fur rmnlog 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20. 1856. 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. XCIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JULY 23, 1921 



No. 30 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA 
ADVERTISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. 
Frederick Marriott, 259 Minna Street, near Fourth, San Francisco, Cal. Tele- 
phone Kearny 720. Entered at San Francisco, Ca]., Post Office as second 
class mail matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co., 30 CornhiM, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year, $5.00. Foreign: One 
year $6.00; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not be 
responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 



Having run to the end of their rope on sex-drama the movies 

are working animal pictures to a fine finish. 
* * * 

Even assemblymen are being pulled before the courts for vio- 
lating Dry fanatical provisions. Who is not a lawbreaker these days? 



aker th< 

* * * 

Hell is a a comfortable apartment house compared with starv- 
ing Russia these days, they say. 

* * * 

In our new charter, which is so badly needed, we should make 

the police judges appointive, and not elective. 

* * * 

A new charter for San Francisco is what we require to make a 

clean sweep in the City Hall. 

•Y. * v 

The Examiner wants municipal markets. Not if the unhappy 

taxpayer can help it. The municipality is too busy running the city 
into bankruptcy. 

.f v .v. 

How did the United States manage to exist before we had 

created all our vast library of legal wisdom, providing for the guid- 
ance and restriction of a citizen from the cradle to the grave? 

Did our absentee-newspaper publisher's hectic advocacy of the 

Soldier Bonus have any effect on its locomotor ataxia in Congress? 

Is he a perennial hoodoo? 

•Y- * ¥ 

Postponement of the Soldier Bonus by Congress will keep the 

Legion so busy it will ha\e little lime for all the many small affairs 
il has been worrying over. 

V -V ■¥ 

■ The newspapers say Siillman is losing hope of winning his 

malodorous lawsuit. And we can add that newspaper readers arc 
losing hope they will ever hear the last of the rotten mess. 

•v * 

The dailies should write up. how various automobile factories 

have reduced prices without due notice to San Francisco agents and 
caused them serious loss. Utterly dishonest. 
* * ¥ 

With Harding and his Cabinet running national affairs. Amer- 
icans should get over their fears of Bolshevism and invest in real 
estate. A nation which neglects land investments is not wise nor 

secure. 

■v- * * 

Do those wasteful Supervisors in the lily Hall ever think of that 

old story of the Sword of Damocles, swinging overhead suspended 
i single hair? The apathetic taxpayers will wake up one of these 
fine days. 



If much more of the whiskey in bonded warehouse evaporates, 

or turns into water, the Orpheum will be offering engagements to 
the magicians on the Prohibition Enforcement staff. 

What is the use of Congress wasting time and money in bringing 

in reports to prove that Josephus Daniels was a dub. Doesn't the 
whole United States and every Filipino mess-boy know it. Leave 
him in the woodshed. 

They are arresting people for selling port wine and a little 

claret. We are as fanatical as in the days of Cotton Mather, the 
Boston preacher who wanted to hang all old women who had epilep- 
tic fits, as witches. 

Washington E. Vanderlip will have a fine time making the 

American people believe he knows better than Secretary Hughes, 
how the United States shauld treat the Russian Bolshevists. Sit 
down Washington. 

The Shriners are getting ready to do big things in the enter- 
tainment of the Shriner Convention in San Francisco next June. In 
money it means millions to our city. In prestige, more. The Shrin- 
ers never do things on a cheap scale. 

¥ % .v. 

Those "masterpieces" that were slashed out of their frames at 

the Sutro Baths and were found somewhere near Spokane, may have 
been taken by some rancher, who wanted to tack them on his fences 
and keep out gophers. 

A New York corporation is suing Jim Rolph as director in a 

coffee plantation company, which, as the stockholders declare, lost 
them a million. If the taxpayers of San Francisco sued Jim what 
would they place their losses at ? 

They talk about San Francisco being a closed town because it 

hasn't a bridge over the bay. 

It has been a "closed town" for thirty years, because of the 
Closed Shop. 

-George Wheeler Hinman. the financial expert, says that our 



Nation's future "hangs upon our own efforts as never before." Our 
future always hangs upon our- own efforts, only sometimes the fact 
becomes somewhat clearer. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

Supervisor McLeran thought the Municipal Research Bureau a 

desirable concern till it refused to play monkey for him any longer 
and climb telegraph poles. Now he intimates that it amounts to 
nothing. Who ever but himself thought otherwise? 

* * * 

Deauville the fashionable French watering place boasts of its 

startling breaches of the staid proprieties. It wouldn't if il ever saw 
the one-piece bathing suits at Santa Cruz that the San Jose belles 
wear. 

* * * 

\ prominent "society girl and church worker" in Eureka is 

suing a policeman who arrested her for whistling on the street. Why 
not? If a Volstead Enforcer can jail you for drinking a glass of beer 
or wine, why can't a cop rob you of your freedom to whistle when 
you feel that way? 



San Francisco News Letter and 



DITqDIAL, 




Press dispatches announce that M. Jon- 
Pope Between Two Fires nart. the French Ambassador to the 
Vatican, has had an audience with the 
Pope. It is important news, though' we pay but little attention to it 
here on the Pacific Coast, so far away are we from the centres of 
world politics. The visit of an Ambassador of France to the Pope 
is big politics. It is not religion, though nominally France is a 
Roman Catholic country. But the Vatican has viewed it with sus- 
picion ever since the Reign of Terror, when the French revolution- 
ists butchered their Catholic clergy as savagely as they did their nobil- 
ity and royalty. Again, in 1871, when the Communists held Paris 
after the war with Germany, the revolutionists were hostile to their 
clergy. 

Still later, the French democracy expelled their religious orders 
in a manner which was more suggestive of fanaticism than reason 
and justice. The monasteries and convents, had what might be 
called vested rights. No matter what might be thought of their dog- 
mas, and rituals, they were entitled to humane consideration. To 
expel religieuses from their shelters and throw them on the world of 
which they know but little, does not appeal to fair-minded men of 
any sect. Governments should at least try to appear just. 

The French government, when going through its latest spasm of 
materialism ordered all the crucifixes to be removed from the 
courts of law. Formerly French witnesses were sworn on the cru- 
cifix as the emblem of Christian faith. The French Minister of Pub- 
lic Instruction in a memorable address in Paris said: "Now we have 
driven Christ out of our courts we shall not stop until we drive him 
out of our schools." 

Remembering all that, and the deeds of Napoleon, who robbed 
Rome of art treasures, it is hardly likely that the Vatican regards 
France as a stout pillar of orthodox catholicity. For many years, 
the former palace of the French Embassy in Rome has been aban- 
doned. All at once France has appointed M. Jonnart as Ambassador 
to the Vatican and sent with him a staff of five people, including 
two secretaries. Why this sudden move and who is the Ambassador? 

The reason is, that Germany has had an ambassador at the Va- 
tican for a year and the German is said to be urging the Pope to 
help in the consolidation of Austria, Bavaria and Prussia. Germany 
is the endless nightmare of France. 

In America we regard Germany as Lutheran. But for Germa- 
ny's interference, Martin Luther and his pamphlets would have been 
made a bonfire in Rome. Nevertheless, the Roman catholic popu- 
lation in Germany is large, and devoted to its creed. Bavaria is 
even more Catholic than Ireland. It is dotted with churches and 
shrines. Crucifixes are erected at many cross-roads and the natives 
kneels before them and pray as they do in South America. 

The former Kaiser's government aimed to establish cordial rela- 
tions with the Pope, for political reasons, and thereby gave great 
offense to German freethinkers, who wished all friendly relations 
with the Vatican severed. 

Under altered conditions in Germany, the old political policy of 
placating the Pope and his followers in the German Catholic sec- 
tions, is continued. France has decided that she must also have an 
ambassador at the Vatican, but in a measure in what might be called 
"straddling the fence." Her selection of an ambassador is Senator 
Jonnart, who for thirty-five years has represented the district of 
Pas-de-Calais in the French Parliament. He was formerly Governor 
of Algeria, and had to restore peace with the Mahometan subjects 
of Franch. Recently he has had a conciliatory mission for France in 
Syria, and has also represented his country in the Grecian and Turk- 
ish troubles. He was selected by the Paris government to thwart 
the military projects of King Constantin of Greece and at once 



placed 3,000 French soldiers on the Isthmus of Corinth and gave 
Constantin twenty-four hours to reembark his army of the Pelopon- 
essus. All of which was at variance with the desires of the British. 

Senator Jonnart may therefore be regarded as a man of action, 
as well as an experienced diplomat and lawmaker. The desire of his 
Government is to make it appear that he goes on his mission to the 
Vatican as man of open mind, who realizes that "France is a nation 
of great Mahometan strength and above all of great Catholic 
strength." As one of the important French Government journals 
expresses it: "The Senator from Pas-de-Calais is not more Catholique 
than Mahometan," which may be taken to mean that no sect can 
lay claim to him as its exclusive property. His religious preference 
will make little differences in his mission to Rome as he goes to talk 
politics and nothing else. The Vatican will no doubt meet him in 
the same spirit, and if the Pope regards the resumption of cordial 
relations with France, which once was a bulwark of Catholicity, the 
Senator from Pas-de-Calais will be able to keep the German Am- 
bassador from putting anything over on him. 

It is announced that his appointment of the French Ambassador 
to Rome is temporary and its object specific, which politicians inter- 
pret as notice to the world that France is not permanently committed 
to the plan of having an ambassador stationed at the Vatican. 

Caradinal Gasparri. has offered the hospitality of the Vatican 

palace to the French Ambassador, but he has preferred to make his 

headquarters at an hotel. 

* * # 

An instructive story of political 
Dictator? and. the Yel'.ovt Press graft is being spun in the Bul- 
letin's sporting columns by Marion 
Salazar, who was sent by his newspaper to report the fistic affair in 
New Jersey. Tammany in its palmiest days, when police captains 
paid large sums for thir jobs arid maintained steam yachts, was a 
rattletrap political flivver, compared with the machine operating in 
Woodrow Wilson's former bailiwick, while the pugilists and movies 
were puling over their recent scheme. 

Governor Edwards of New Jersey, it seems from Salazar's state- 
ments, entered heartily into the project. The fact that it was against 
the law to hold prize fights in New Jersey bothered him not at all. 
"Go right ahead, gentlemen." he said to promotor Tex Rickard," 
my brother 'Corn' Edwards will build the ring for you." The ring 
was to have cost $125,000. Its actual cost was nearer to $250,000. 
But Rickard like many other "game sports" never kicks when he has 
a chinch. He is not reported to have uttered a word of protest on the 
day of the fight when the expensive but flimsy ring structure, with 
its 90.000 spectators, including over 5.0C0 women, swayed so fear- 
fully that only a miracle averted a frightful tragedy. 

The political machine in New Jersey also picked out the referee 
of the fistic affair. The boxers selected Edgren. the sporting writer, 
but the political machinists caucussed and named the City Marshal 
of Jersey for the well-paid snap. While the pollies caucussed on the 
graft, the army of reporters was ordered to "sit outside," like a 
bunch of hoboes; and they did it without a word of protest. How 
could they protest at being kicked out of a caucus, to promote a 
grafting prize-fight scheme which they were feverishly promoting. 

The Jersey politicians appointed 1000 special policemen at $10 
a day to preserve "order" while the fight in the ring — a felony under 
the State laws, was in progress. Who got the rake-off on that part 
of the scheme Salazar does not hint. The distribution of tickets 
was another phase of the game. According to Salazar, Rickard's 
right arm was weary from handling out bundles of tickets to the 
political grafters, and tickets were worth money on that day. 

All of which influences Brother Salazar to close his expose of the 
graft with the cryptic utterance "Governor Edwards is Boss in New 
Jersey." He might have added that there is nothing to prevent 
every State in the Union from having its Poo-bahas long, as general 
disrespect for the laws and the courts is characteristic of the public, 
and promoted by the yellow press. Largely through the evil influ- 
ence of the sensational press, we are undergoing a Mexicanizat'on 
of American politics. Dictators, like the head politician of New 
Jersey, are in favor. The further they depart from the laws, the 
more popular. New Jersey's dictator was shown in the ring with 
the sluggers as a prize product of American independence, because 
his acquiescence had made a vast scheme of graft possible. Not a 
word was printed about the political features of the scheme, till 
the public had been "shaken down" and the loot divided. 



California Advertiser for July 23, 1921 



When State dictators, of the character of the gentleman who is 
Boss of New Jersey, become more numerous in the United States by 
the connivance or cowardice and crookedness of yellow newspapers, 
they will extend their ambitions to division of the national graft 
instead of State graft. We shall have a reproduction of revolution- 
ary Mexico on a large scale. Dictator fighting dictator. The one 
thing which might console us for that condition would be the inevi- 
table suppression of the agency most powerful in bringing it about. 
Dictators in national power never argue with yellow newspapers. 
They simply throw the editors into jail and heave the type into the 
streets. 

The kicking out of reporters at Jersey, while the politicians ar- 
ranged the graft, was a mild foretaste of what the sensational news- 
papers are bringing on themeslves. 

* * ■¥ 

The announcement that the Anglo- 
Business Moving Up Town California Trust Company has leased 

the corner of Market and Jones streets, 
opposite the Hibernia Bank, is interesting. Business is going up town 
in San Francisco, much as business has gone up town in New York. 
San Francisco has been very slow to recognize that its lines of busi- 
ness expansion, run west and south. As yet we have hardly begun 
to realize that San Francisco is extending to San Mateo, and that 
the suburban towns are closing up the spaces between them. In the 
thirty years that San Fracnisco has practically stopped its upward 
progress at Sixth and Market, New York has been extended a hun- 
dred blocks from the centre of night life at Fourteenth street and 
Union Square. Thirty years ago most of the large theatres were be- 
low Fourteenth street. Now they are forty blocks above it. 

When the Hibernia Bank located at the junction of Jones and 
McAllister, people thought that it was a risky move, but the wise di- 
rectors had vision. The great popular savings bank is now in the very 
centre of the city and before long that centre will be at Market and 
Van Ness. Daniel Bumham, the famous Chicago architect, pointed 
out the real centre, when he was called here to lay out city plans 
after the fire of 1906. 

When we learn sense enough to cease war on our city railroads 
and begin, in earnest, to build up San Francisco, its growth in the 
direction of San Mateo should be very rapid. It has as yet scarcely 
commenced, owing to the apathy of large property owners on upper 
Market street, and the lack of vision of many real estate men who 
follow the ways and ideas of the pioneers, that regarded Montgomery 
street the permanent centre of our seaport. 
■¥ •¥ -Y- 

The Attorney-General of California is making a 

The Real Point great splurge about American landowners, who 

sell out to Japanese r-nd camouflage the records. 

Some of the newspapers are praising the Attorney-General for his 

alert patriotism in exposing the offenders. 

But the really important point is being missed entirely. Why are 
landowners so ready to sell to Japs or anybody else? Is it the taxes 
or the labor problems that they cannot solve? 

Every day we hear of some while rancher who is trying to get 
rid of his holdings because the labor question has worn out his pa- 
tience. Not that his ranch is unproductive. By no means. Many 
California ranchers are a fine investments for the people, who can 
cultivate them. The ownership of land in California is passing into 
the hands of aliens of various kind. American owners, discouarced 
by their difficulties, are ready to transfer their interests to anybody 
who offers them a fair price, and it will be as hard to stop them as 
to muzzle bottleggcrs. 

If the Sacramento statemen would cut taxes one half and jail 

all the Bolshevist agitators and the profiteers who are bleeding the 

American farmer to death, there would be more American citizens 

willing to cultivate their lands. 

* ¥ ¥ 

In the matter of propaganda to raise salaries 
School Propaganda of school teachers, the State Superintendent 
Will C. Wood is the smoothest politician in 
California. He is always working the daily press. Latterly we have 
heard much about the county schools being sadly in need of teach- 
ers, as the young women would not accent the miserable pay. and put 
up with the hardships inseparable Irom teaching in the rural dis- 
tricts. All propaganda. Now Mr. Wood is out with a personal 



spiel about the "financial struggle of teachers and the necessity of 
increasing their salaries." 

Within two years the propaganda emanating from Mr. Wood's 
office in Sacramento has added to the taxes of California, ten mil- 
lion dollars for teachers' salary increases. Mr. Wood's staff of poli- 
tical propagandists are insatiable as a plague of locusts. Like the 
daughters of the horse-leech they continually cry "give!" "give!" 

On what big office has Superintendent Wood fixed his eagle eyes? 
It cannot be Governor for the awful example of Woodrow Wilson 
as a pedagogue in public office, has blacklisted schoolmasters for 
the remainder of this generation. 



Causes of Building Crisis 

LOS ANGELES, the Open Shop town, appears to be one of the 
few places in the United States where there is encouraging act- 
ivity in building. The latest news from New York is far from 
satisfactory. San Francisco has been tied up by labor troubles for 
two months. 

There can be no activity in the building industry until it is 
realized by State and municipal governments, that people do not 
put their money into buildings for benevolent reasons. Houses are 
built as speculations, and in San Francisco building, in late years 
has been a very bad speculation. Our politicians in collusion with 
the unions, have done everything possible to rob investors in build- 
ings. Erection has been made as expensive as possible. Whatever 
way was the lowest and most costly, has been chosen by our Board 
of Works as the method to fo'low. If an owner undertook to re- 
model a building, and did not comply with every drastic regulation 
of the Board and the unions, he had to tear out the new work and 
do it all over. That pleased the business agent of the unions, but rob- 
bed many a man, established the belief that it was a dangerous pro- 
position to put money into real estate. On Market street, a row of 
tenements owned by a very wealthy family, is being torn down and a 
fence olaced around the vacant lot. If improved, the new tenements 
would be leased at once, but the rich owners prefer to leave the land 
unimproved, hoping perhaps that someone more courageous or patri- 
otic will build near them and increase the value of their vacant prop- 
erty. When there are so many non-taxable securities in the investment 
market it is not to be expected that people will prefer o risk their 
money on buildings that are taxed heavily, and where the landlord 
is largely at the mercy of politicians. 

This is a very serious question. The old generation of citizens 
that put their savings into homes, do not exist anymore. The new 
generation live in apartments, and what they expect will be- 
come of them, when they grow older and lose their earning power, 
heaven only knows. The high rents eat them up, and they never 
can save a cent. The old-fashioned home was a great stimulus to 
save something and even if the house was jerry-built, it was worth 
something as long as it stood up. Then there was always the chance 
of the ground increasing in value by reason of some improvement 
in the neighborhood. 

San Francisco will not improve as long as we are fettered by the 
city charter which Mayor Phelan was instrumental in having passed. 
Il was defective in many ways, and the labor demagogues and Bol- 
shevists have made it so much worse that our taxpayers are eaten 
up by official parasites. It cost about $5.0C0,000 to run the city 
when the charter was adopted. Now we spend about $25,000,000 
a year for upkeep. It is easier to adopt a new charter and get rid 
of all the parasites than put them in jail for obtaining their salaries 
under false pretenses. 

It is certain, if the sensible citizens do not get busy and remedy 
the evils that affect realty ownership and building, our city shall 
go back instead of forward. The idea that San Francisco can lei 
cheap demagogues run our municipality and still advance is a pipe 
dream. 



Ibanez has found former Russian leader Kerensky and ought to 

write him up as the Fifth Horseman of the Apocalypse. And lo when 
the fifth seal was opened there was a rustling of whiskers in Russia 
and the $65,000,000. loaned by poor simple Uncle Sam vanished 
like a drop of water on the Mojave Desert. Ibanez might get a clue 
from Mr. Kerensky where all that swag went. Of course no one 
would ever suspect Ktr. 



San Francisco News Letter and 



England's Worst Enemy 



By HARVEY BROUGHAM 



WE read so much about De Vaiera and the Irish troubles that 
we exaggerate their importance, as compared with the im- 
portance of Ghandi, the nationalist leader in British India, 
and his agitation extension of Indian liberty. The Sinn Fein notable 
and his aspirations are relatively of small importance. At the most 
Ireland cannot effect much change in the political conditions of Great 
Britain, bu^ Ghandi's plan if successful would mean the expulsion of 
the white man's civilization from Asia and the inauguration of a new 
social condition in India which regards the white man's Factory 
Chimney with hatred. 

Ghandi is a dangerous force as viewed by the British, for he 
unites uneducated and superstitious Indians in a movement to restore 
the laws and customs of his race before the British conquerors came. 
He is more than a political agitator. He is a popular saint of a 
kind which has often arisen in Asia, the land of professional "holy 
men," who regard all worldly display as "pomp and vanity." In 
Ghandi's eyes the ideal citizen is a native Indian who lives on the 
edge of the jungle in peaceful observance of the olden laws, and 
whose entire wordly possessions not bring three dollars at auction. 
This reactionary creed it at once the strength and the fatal weakness 
of his propaganda. Ghandi may start a movement to drive the white 
men out of India, but eventually physical force will extinguish his 
philosophy of a world controlled by "soul force." Human nature 
never changes at the core. 

Who is this Hindu, St. John the Baptist who wanders in the 
desert, and stirs up the Indian native against British Herods? St. 
John, in his day never ceased to rail against his rulers who held 
their power by consent of Ancient Rome, but at last Herod Antipas 
threw him into a dungeon and cut off his head to please his wife 
Herodias. Will Ghandi share the fate of most Asiatic propagandists? 

This apostle of "soul-force" is a frail little man. 52 years old, 
the son of a low caste Hindu of the presidency of Bombay. He has 
fasted so much that, physically, he is a mere shadow of a man. 
He never wears shoes, dresses in coarse white trousers and a cap 
of the military service cut which is known throughout India as the 
"Ghandi Cap." When at home he often sits in front of his house 
squatted with his legs crossed in Oriental style, and surrounded by 
his disciples. He is a true Hindu. 

It may sound offensive to repeat, but Christians, including some 
American missionaries, having seen the man's humility and devotion 
to his ideals, have compared him to Christ. In that fact we find the 
extraordinary popular favor which the patient propagandist enjoys. 

He is really a philosophical anarchist and notwithstanding his 
appearance of poverty is a man of some education and travel. He 
was intended for the law and finished his legal training in London 
where he donned European dress, read law in the Middle Temple 
and brought his young Eastern mind into its first contact with 
western civilization which distressed him. 

The period of his change to that of an Asiatic agitator began 
when he went from London to South Africa to defend an Indian 
who had been arrested under the laws against immigration of Asiat- 
ics. Being a British subject as well as was his client he thought they 
should have equal rights with the white people in South Africa, a 
British colony. He learned that such was not the fact and began a 
campagne for Indian rights. He and his entire family were thrown 
into jail, an act against which he protested in one of the first of the 
hunger strikes. He was kept in jail for two years and his health has 
never completely recovered. In all. he was jailed three times and 
once he was ambushed by friends for suspected treachery and left 
for dead. But his long campaign of passive resistance finally com- 
pelled General Smuts to negotiate with him and the Smuts-Ghandi 
legislation is still on the statute books at Cape Town. By this time, 
he knew that the problem of white men vs. brown men is the biggest 
problem in any empire which attempts to rule both; he believed that 



Indians would never receive their full "lights" in any white dominion 
until they had first won them in India. 

The Amritzar affair in the Punjab has further embittered 
Ghandi. Amritzar is a town with 150,000 people. An English 
v.omrn missionary was attacked and injured, rioting broke out. The 
troops fired on the rioters with machine guns and then bombed 
Amritzar from aeroplanes. Over 500 Indians were killed and 
2.000 wounded. A military order compelling all Indians to crawl on 
hands and knees through the street where the missionary was at- 
tacked has been most resented by the natives. The Prince of Wales 
wrs to have opened the first Indian Legislative Assembly last winter, 
but owing to the native bitterness, it was decided to send the Duke 
of Connaught as an older man. The natives received the Duke in 
silence in empty streets where the shops were all closed. Similar con- 
ditions prevailed when he embarked for England. 

Although Ghandi is the Government of India's greatest foe, the 
Government is forced to refrain from arresting him; for it is Ghandi, 
and Ghandi alone, who has directed not only Hindu resentment at 
the Punjab atrocities but the more explosive wrath of India's Mo- 
hammedans over the Turkish Peace Treaty into the silent channels 
of passive resistance. Take Ghandi away and the Government of 
India might see at once the dawn of that red day which all white 
men in the East dread but which they never talk about, the day 
when the East "breaks loose." 

Although he is the most powerful enemy the Government of In- 
dia has ever encountered, the Government is forced to treat him as 
a friend. In fact, one of the first official acts of the new Viceroy 
of India, Lord Reading, was to summon the dark little Hindu to a 
conference at Delhi. 

Ghandi's programm was arranged in four stages: 

1. Refusal to accept Government titles and positions. 

2. Refusal to attend Government schools. 

3. Refusal to serve in the Government police or the Indian 
army. 

4. Refusal to pay Government taxes. 

Thus far he has used only the first two stages. If necessary to 
rid India of the British, he says he will utilize the third and fourth 
stages. If all four stages should fail, if "souldforce" fails. I0.0C0,- 
000 Hindus are to leap to the sword. India is to be purged of the 
British within three years. 

With Ghandi stand the two Mohammedan leaders, Mohammed 
and Shaukat Ali. Back of this trio stand the Indian National Con- 
gress and the All-India Mohammedan League. Now Hindus are 
permitted to enter the Great Mosque of the Mogul Emperors at Dehli 
— both religions joined apparently in such union as India would 
never have deemed possible. 

It is this union which has impressed Clemenceau so greatly that 
since his return to Paris, from his tiger hunting in India he is reported 
to have said, England cannot hold India with its copulation of 330,- 
000,000. 



Beggar Elected Councillor 

The farce of the election of a beggar as city councillor in Am- 
sterdam has come partly to an end. inasmuch as the hero has signed 
a declaration that he will not take his seat. He gave this undertaking 
in prison, where he is serving a sentence for drunkenness. 

However, the people who started the affair are continuing their 
activity on the same lines. They have now founded a new party. 
the official name of which is "Rapalje party" (the Party of the 
Rabble.) The one and only point of their programme is to ridicule 
and to fight by all means, however disreputable these may be, the 
compulsory vote. The new party has already branches in Amster- 
dam and Rotterdam, and they have declared their intention to put 
up more beggar candidates in coming elections. 

In the meantime the Government has postponed without date the 
debates on the new bill introduced by them to avoid the recurrence 
of happenings of this kind. — Manchester Guardian. 



The income of the Anti-Saloon- League of New York for the 
fiscal year ended April 30 was $356,000, of which comely little sum 
$237,000 went for salaries, labor and clerk hire, and traveling and 
hotel expenses. 



California Advertiser jot July -23, 1921 



Open Shop Dangers 

By L. T. THOMPSON 



1 hough the newspapers state that the plumbers have accepted 
the Open Shop or American Plan of industry, it should not be taken 
as a certainty that labor has shaken off the shackles of the labor 
politicians. It is well for employers to remember some important 
tacts about the industrial condition which the Closed Shop has 
caused. 

hor thirty years the Gompers administration has been riveting 
the bonds on organized labor. No apprentices worth speaking of have 
been trained. 1 hus a serious scarcity of skilled labor has been 
brought about. Some trades refused to sanction apprenticeship at 
ail. Some confined it to the sons or other relatives of union mem- 
bers. In the trades that tolerated apprenticeship the limit was so 
small that the number of new journeymen was sure to be less than 
required. 

Death end disability from old age are constantly reducing the list 
of active journeymen. If therefore a union restrict apprentices to 
one for e.ery six journeymen, the requisite supply of skilled labor 
would be sure to vanish. By the time that an apprentice had learned 
his trade, some of the six journeymen on which his ratio was based, 
would have dropped out of the craft. In ten or twenty years, at 
taat rcite of reciuiting, the trade would not have nearly enough ac- 
tive men to meet the demand, if even no expansion of business took 
place. But in the United States there is constant expansion, so 
the restriction of apprentices has placed employers in several crafts 
at the mercy of their men. There is in most trades a scarcity of help, 
deliberately created, and it will take some time to restore the equili- 
brium. 

I hat is not the worst feature. Many of the new men who have 
come into the skilled trades are not properly trained. It takes five 
jears to make a competent journeyman, but most of the American 
journeymen have not had three. The rules for apprentices have been 
made by the unions and purposely designed to give the employers 
the worst of it. Before the apprentice is half trained, he is paid 
such an amount that his services are generally a loss to the employer, 
and consequently many employers have objected to any apprentices 
in their shops, as being worse than useless. That view, being fav- 
orable to the union creation of scarcity, the employers have been 
enccuraged to discard apprenticeship and hasten their own undoing. 

In former days apprenticeship in America was regulated by State 
laws. An apprentice was compelled to observe them. In Europe, ap- 
prenticeship had to be paid for. The employer was regarded as con- 
ferring a favor on the apprenticeship by teaching him a trade, and 
allowing him to have access to the shop and use of tools. Generally 
five years was the foreign apprentice period. The legal theory was 
thai the employer had a right to benefit, to some extent, by the 
labor of his apprentice. The latter therefore did not immediately 
receive large wages. His pay was small and was slowly increased. 
If the apprentice ran away, the police sought him out as a fugitive 
and brought him back. The effect of this system was to provide 
a class of thoroughly skilled craftsmen, who are hardly to be found 
in the United States amongst native mechanics. Many of the best 
mechanics in America are aliens, who served their apprenticeship in 
Europe under the old conditions. Complaint is often heard of the 
preference ^' Xl '" foreign mechanics in the United States, but such 
men are preferred because of their superior training. They have 
learned their trades and that is why they obtain good positions and 
get the best pay. 

I he Federation of Labor has, therefore, been a great curse to 
industrial America, for it has shut American boys out of the trades, 
and driven them into the undesirable fields of unskilled labor, the 
Army and \.i\>. 

In the unskilled field they are brought into competition with the 
lowest order of alien and negro labor, and the inevitable consequense 
is that many of them take to crime. We first of all educate an 
American boy. then permit a selfish labor trust to shut him out ot 



the skilled trades, and when he yields to the temptations of crime 
we lock him up in a State prison to become a hop-fiend with no 
hopeful outlook on life. It is something for patriotic Americans to 
think over. 

The future of American industry lies in the Open Shop, but there 
is a great deal more to be done than have an announcement placed 
in the newspapers, that some Chamber of Commerce has signed up 
with the unions to accept the American Plan. Where are the em- 
ployers to get Open Shop help in trades that are organized 100 per 
cent? For thirty years the Federation of Labor has been urging 
men, and coercing men, and murdering men to solidify their organ- 
ization. Every good mechanic is in the unions. He has wisely pre- 
ferred to pay his dues and go along quietly, instead of being black- 
listed or beaten to death. He does not care much whether he goes 
into on Open Shop or a closed shop, if left in peace. He understands 
his trade and the employer will be glad to retain him in any shop. 

But what of the political bum who is living on the prestige of a 
union card and cannot or will not do an honest days work? 

He may stand far higher in the union than the best mechanic in 
the shop. He attends every meeting and talks on every proposition 
to strike. From the moment he enters the Open Shop, he is or- 
ganizing on the job and as far as he can he demoralizes the con- 
cern. He cannot be thrown out for there is no surplus of skilled labor 
at hand. 

The fact is, and employers had better realize it, there is an arti- 
ficial scarcity of labor and it can only be improved by a period of 
missionary effort. The Open Shop can do the improvement, but not 
in a day or in six months. The business men of the United States 
have allowed themselves to be out-generaled by politicians and only 
realize their position when they find themselves robbed of most of 
their profits. They have reached the stage where they can no longer 
protect themselves by passing their expenses up to the consumer, for 
the latter is on strike with his back to the wall. 

It is something that the business men have gained the first battle 
in the fight for the Open Shop, but much remains to be done. 
Eternal vigilance is the price of liberty. 




FOR the Man who would have his 
dress an expression of self, in its 
irrectness and evident quality — 
md him to our Mad e-to-Mea sure 
I >ress Shirts, Robes, ruxedo Shii ts, I 
mas. Sport Shirts, Linden* ear. Neckwear 




U HY - 

D. C. HEGER 

116-118 Kearny St. 



San Francisco News Letter and 







The Oraagemen and Catholics — It's a queer turn of political af- 
fairs in the Green Isle, when De Valera says to Sir James Craig the 
Ulster leader, "You can't come into this caucus that Sinn Fein is 
holding with Lloyd George." A few days ago, it was Sir James 
who was vociferating in a rich Belfast accent that he would have no 
talk of any kind with "Traitors." But De Valera dodges that pet 
term by dubbing himself a patriot all the same as George Wash- 
ington. There is some slight difference but slight difference are not 
worth considering in Irish politics. 

The British Premier seems to have become so mixed on the sub- 
ject of Irish patriots and rebels, that he never can get out of the 
tangle. Just before the world war, the orangemen were preparing 
openly to rebel, and had started to drill and arm. General French 
had resigned his position in the British army, to command the Ulster 
revolutionists. A number of other British officers followed General 
French's example. Suddenly it was all changed. As if by magic, 
French was commanding the British forces in France, and the Or- 
angemen were close with the British war office, while the Sinn Fei- 
ners were blacklisted as pro-German and dangerous rebels. 

Suddenly another shuffle of the political pack of cards. De Val- 
era who was expected to be shot, as soon as the Black-and-Tans laid 
hands on him, has had an ovation in London, and is holding confi- 
dential talks with the British Premier, while the Orangemen's leader, 
Sir James, is left to cool his heels outside till the pow-wow is fin- 
ished. It all looks like opera bouffe at this distance from the British 
Isles. Woodrow Wilson's historic Cabinet could hardly make a 
worse mess of it. 

What a lot of trouble the British would have saved themselves 
by letting the Orangemen and the Sinn Feiners fight it out like the 
Kilkenny cats and then picked the victors after the fur ceased to 
fly. It's only a narrow sectarian fight at the best, and if the 80 per 
cent Catholics inflict a political defeat on the 20 per cent of Orange- 
men, what difference will it make in the world's sectarian distribu- 
tion. There are 500,000,000 Christians divided somewhat evenly 
into warring sects over small matters of ritual. In all Ireland there 
are not much more than 4,000,000 people since the Black and Tans 
energetic reduction of population and the increased emigration to 
America. In England alone there are more Catholics than in all 
Ireland. Yet His Holiness the Pope shows no immediate inclination 
to abandon Rome and locate in Piccadilly. Nor would he be likely 
to move the Vatican to Cork the moment De Valera cleaned up Sir 
James Craig's constituents and put Sinn Feiners in every Irish office 
fat enough to support a jaunting car and a goat. 



Like A Public Dump — I often wonder what travellers must think 
of San Francisco when it keeps its ocean beach, near the Cliff House, 
in such wretched condition. It would not be a credit to a little 
Mexican harbor after a revolution. Sometime the sand is swept by 
the wind so that the roadway is like a dune. That, however, is 
but a temporary inconvenience. The unkempt condition of the beach 
is however permanent. Perhaps somebody is paid for sweeping it 
up and burning the rubbish, but if so the job is a sinecure. The row 
of wretched shacks along the roadway, would be a discredit to Mil- 
pitas. Many experienced travellers pass through San Francisco. 
We should not let them carry away a bad impression of our city. 
Now being vacation time the beach is like a public dump with all 
the old papers fluttering around. 



Promoting Bolshevism — The Prohibition Enforcer with the Zen- 
ophonic name, is certainly using the new broom effectively on the 
bootleggers, but it must be remembered that if the culprits did not 
find a ready and profitable market for their poison, they would not be 
in the risky business. 

If the Enforcer used a hundred new brooms, he could not stop 
the underground flood of tanglefoot which is welling up in San 



Francisco and all through the United States. Bone dry prohibition can 
never be accomplished, but Bolshevism can be spread amongst the 
discontented multitude robbed of their beer and wine. The harder 
the Enforcer works the more Bolshevism. 



Sets People Thinking — It seems that the "disabled" veteran of 
the world war who walked off with $30,000 worth of securities, be- 
longing to his employers, McDonnell & Co., San Francisco, invest- 
ment brokers, was receiving $100 a month because of physical dis- 
abilities. Besides that the 21 year-old-thief got a salary from his 
civilian employers. Are there two sides to this hullaballoo about 
"cruel neglect of disabled heroes." 



Some practical joker must be making up the Examiner's 

"forms." Alongside Arthur Brisbane's editorial paragraphs this 
week, on wonderful human progress, the humoristic printer placed 
the story of an English Episcopal minister in Florida, who was tarred, 
feathered and flogged for preaching social equality of negroes. Next 
to the news of the minister's experience was a story of a Florida 
chambermaid who was tarred and feathered and had her hair clipped, 
because she committed bigamy in Texas. Adjoining these two edi- 
fying scraps of proof that the world progresses, was a column about 
a 67-year-old realty broker of Los Gatos, who was caught in his 
pajamas in a rich widows apartment on Larkin street, and forced to 
make over his residence, and other property, to his wife who sues 
for divorce. Oh yes the world progresses at headlong speed. That's 
■why we are all so giddy. 



DISAPPOINTED CUSTOMER 

An elderly lady in Iowa was in the habit of receiving notice from 
her butcher on what day he was going to kill and so ordered her 
joints accordingly. One day the butcher's son called on her as 
usual and informed her that father would be killing a pig tomorrow, 
which notice elicited an order from her for a loin of pork. Not, 
however, receiving the expected joint, she made a point of seeing 
the boy when next he called and asked him why he had not brought 
the pork as promised. "Oh. mum." replied the boy, "father didn't 
kill after all yesterday, as during the night our pig got better of the 
cholera." 




Ihe treasured^ 
secret of coffee - 
roastind-producef 
tiie wondrous flavor 

(Swell's 

^-^ KAIIONAl CREST 



Off 



California Advertiser jot July 23, 1921 



WHAT PROHIBITION IS DOING 

Commenting on the anti-Volstead paraders in New York who 
marched five miles in a temperature of 90 degrees in the shade the 
Portland Spectator remarks: 

"The courageous and hardy marchers in the parade of protest 
hold the opinion that the prohibition law is an unwarranted inter- 
ference in their personal affairs — a brazen violation of their right 
to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. They regard the Vol- 
stead amendment with feelings of disapprobation and disgust similar 
lo those aroused by the Tea act of 1 773, when some of our intrepid 
forefathers joined in an enterprise of which we are very proud, and 
which is enshrined in history as the Boston Tea Party. Pendulums 
swing to the incessant change of time; who knows but that before 
long we shall give to the perspiring protestants against the Volstead 
law a little of that applause that is still accorded those who, mas- 
querading cs Mohawks, showed their resentment against the Tea act 
by turning old Boston harbor into a huge and very tempestuous 
teapot? 

In the meantime, prohibition is not prohibiting those with money 
and the desire for liquor from getting all they want. Home-brewing 
has taken, and holds, its place as the queen of kitchen industries. 
Illicit distilling on a commercial scale that is highly renumerative is 
practiced in communities where heretofore it was unknown. Our 
imports of liquor from Canada and Mexico and by ocean paths are 
numerically respectable if legally reprehensible. Our bootleggers, 
thick as autumnal leaves that strow the brooks in Vallambrosa, may 
be infamous, but they are quiet and rich. Every few days we hear 
of scandals in police departments whose members share the inor- 
d.nate piofits of the illicit trade in liquor. 

These things are unlawful — criminal, and violations of a law 
should not be charged against the law; we all know that, or, at 
least, some of us, know that. But there are the deplorable facts — 
a few of them. Something could be said of the hip-pocket bars, 
wilhcut which few public or private dances are complete; the dis- 
licssing excesses among young people who find pleasure in drinking 
because it has the added filip of unlawfulness; the frightful increase 
in debasing drug consumption. But these need not be discussed 
now. The point is that prohibition is not, and cannot be, enforced 
because a majority of the people believe it is violative of rights that 
are inalienable. They look on prohibition as the colonists did on the 
Tea act, and as the earlier colonists did on the anti-tobacco, anti- 
lace, anti-sport, and anti-everything-else laws designed to make life 
a .perpetual funeral party. 

The prohibition law has done some good; a lew drunkards who 
cannot afford the price are sober. But it has done, and is doing, 
incrlculable harm; many persons who can afford the price have In- 
come d unkards; and with our home-brews and illicit stills and ubi- 
quitous botlleggers and hippocket bars, we are becoming a nation 
of lawbreakers. Probably the parade in New Y oik was more than 
a mere protest against a bad law. 



auctioned off and the proceeds given to charity. It would be a 
substantial donation and the buyer a proud woman. See this fine 
Skunk tippet I'm wearing? It's from the animal that ran across 
John D. Rockefeller's golf links. 



SURPRISE REVUE AT TECHAUS 

The Surprise Revue of the Year is causing talk among those 
who frequent Techau Tavern. New both as to numbers and pretty 
girls, original in idea and artisticly lovely in costuming, the revue is 
. received with much applause. 

Dancers pronounce Techau Tavern Orchestra the best in town for 
"Toddling," and every evening finds enthusiastic performers of the 
popular new slop thronging the spacious dance floor. After-theater 
parties are in particularly high favor, and the delicious and dainty 
suppers served are an added attraction. The "Lucky" dances con- 
tinue to be in high favor, the nri?es being boxes of Melachrino Ci- 
s and Miss Savior's Chocolates. 

Dinner is now both table d'hote and a la carte, while the 85c 
special luncheons are particularly popular with these who wish to 
entertain their friends. 



ENVY OF WEALTH 

I \in when a skunk runs across John D. Rockefeller's golf links 
and is chased by the keeper the yellow newspapers have to feature 
it .is a big stry. And yet we keep up the prestense that we do not 
adore wealth and all its beglongings. The Skunk's fur should be 



President Harding's successful advocacy of free crude petroleum 

and fuel oil gives universal satisfaction. 

¥ ¥ .Y- 

Edward James Cattell, statistician of the City of Philadelphia, 

who is visiting here, declares San Francisco will grow more in the 
next ten years than it has in the past thirty. But the Rolph admin- 
istration hasn't been in office thirty years, Mr. Cattell — only about 
half that. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

We begin to have doubts of Chairman A. D. Lasker of the 

United States Shipping Board. All his talk is about how much the 
other fellows squandered and how much more money he needs than 
Congress has appropriated. Let us watch him. 
¥ ¥ ¥ 

Samuel Gompers objects to admission of Chinese to Hawaii. 

Sure. What the Hawaiian sugar planters need to make their busi- 
ness a mint is white labor at a dollar an hour, with double pay for 
overtime. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

Having worn himself out in politics, old Bill Bryan is drawing 

a salary from the Volstead brotherhood, and you can bet a bottle 
of "bootleg" it's a liberal salary. Old Bill will be able to leave a 
million or two in his will for nobody ever hears of his spending 
a nickel on charity, notwithstanding all his platform benevolence. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

The pugilistic promoters are killing the goose which laid golden 

eggs as large as steamer trunks. Having set all the fools crazy about 
the Dempsey-Carpentier little match of twelve rounds with big soft 
gloves, and raked in fortunes, they are now trying to work up ex- 
citement over a slugging match between the Frenchman and Mr. 
Mike Gibbons, who ought to be piling lumber instead of wasting his 
time punching a bag. Anybody foolish enough to spend a dollar on 
another "International" slugging match should be deprived of his 
vote. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

Il is going some, in the way of press agency! A film soubrette 

ol Los Angeles gets nearly two columns of free publicity and a twelve 
inch double column portrait, on the pretext that she has made a 
pongee-silk dress costing $1.75 while sitting around waiting for the 
cry "camera," If a merchant who pays thousands a year in advert- 
ising asked that amount of free notice he would be thrown out of the 
yellow newspaper office. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

The newspapers predict a speed of 1000 miles an hour, when 

the air-mail service is established. But where are all the aviators 
to come from. Nearly every day there are a couple killed, though 
■a? ha\e not hit up a speed of 100 miles an hour? And how about 
the holidays, when all of L'ncle Sam's boys in the post office lay 
off and let the mail go plotz. for all they care. The Fourth-of-July 
newspapers from New York, haven't reached San Francisco yet, on 
this 20th of July in the Year of our Lord 1921. We have to go 
some yet. to reach that 1000 knots an hour. 

The EYE and the BRAIN 

Headache, Dizziness, Weak, 
Inflamed, Smarting, Sensitive or Gluey 
loating Spots, Crusty or Granu- 
lated Eyelids, Astigmatism, Watery Eyes 
and inability to see object* clearly — all 
these symptoms and many other ailments 
can be directly or indirectly attributed to 
EYE STRAIN*. 
TO RELIEVE THESE AILMENTS YOU 

MUST REMOVE THE CAUSE 
The latest and most scientific instruments 
1 in examining children's eyes and 
complicated cases of eye defects. 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

EXCLUSIVE KVF>ir,HT SPECIALIST 
Charter Member American Association of 
. . c ians 
27 V I Francisco 

960 MARKET STREET 

Be" Mid Taylor 

I RAN CI SCO 




10 



San Francisco News Letter and 





FINA NCIAL S 




AN EXPECTED SENSATION this past 
week was the announcement of the suit 
brought by the stockholders of the Chiapas 
Coffee Company. G. Amsinck & Co., who 
own a big block of stock, and one other 
stockholder, who owns a much large number 
of shares, charge gross mismanagement and 
attendant losses upon which they hope to re- 
cover from the directors. The suit involves 
George U. Hind and James Rolph, Jr., and 
others. The stockholders petition for a re- 
ceiver and an accounting of the affairs of 
the company. Much sympathy has been ex- 
pressed as to Mr. Hind. This is one of a 
number of ventures in which some of the 
stockholders have figured, which has at last 
come before the court, and it is expected 
that others will follow. 

Work in construction of the downtown 
sky-scrapers is taking on a more active look. 
It is reported that more than five thousand 
men are at work in the business and resi- 
dential districts on the American Plan. In 
Oakland the building trades' unions have 
come to time and have accepted the terms 
of the contractors. That means that the 
American Plan is in full blast in Oakland. 
Building activities will almost immediately 
commence. The next step is to bring down 
the price of materials. The wholesale lum- 
ber dealers are ready to drop their prices an- 
other notch. The lumber yards may have to 
be forced to drop their .prices; cement must 
come down, house builders' hardware must 
drop. The plumber must be brought to time. 
We want prosperous times and the only way 
to have them is to quit profiteering. In some 
directions prices of materials have already 
tumbled. The material man must not think 
the public is insisting on a lower wage for 
labor and that, on the other hand, it will let 
him off easy. The material man must bear 
his share of the cost cut in building. We 
need and must have thousands of houses in 
San Francisco, and all should assist in bring- 
ing about their construction. 
¥ 9 # 

The financial world — in other words, the 
banking interests — are vitally interested in 
this problem of wages, hours, material costs, 
as far as it relates to the building trades or 
investment in buildings or houses. Until some 
sort of a stable base of wages, hours, pro- 
duction and material costs has been reached 
there will be very little money loaned for 
building purposes and very little money 
loaned on mortgages. Real property must 
have a fixed value, and if that value is not 
fixed but is based on all the workman can 
get, all the material man can force out of 
the owner, and if the work hours are to fluc- 
tuate, and the worker is to do as little as 
possible to earn his wage, then capital must 



and will look elsewhere for investment or 
will not be invested at the present time. 

In these days of tax free municipal, state 
and federal securities no sane man is going 
to put his money in real estate or in the con- 
struction of residences or buildings for busi- 
ness purposes unless the way is made just as 
smooth as it can possibly be made for him. 
and yet let the other fellow live. Labor 
unions have put too much "grief" in their 
tactics. They are frightening the man of 
money away from investment in building of 
any kind. This is too bad and we should 
make every effort to lure the capitalist back 

to his old habits. 

* * * 

Just about now is the time for the crepe 
hangers to send out their news that the out- 
look is for very bad crops all over the coun- 
try. The fact is that we are sure to have 
middling to good crops in nearly every sec- 
tion. 

The bridge building project is taking on 
a practical shape, and it is said the surveys 
will be begun immediately, and that those 
who are actively sponsoring the thing find 
no difficulty will be met with to raise the 
necessary money to carry on the work. The 
cost of the preliminary surveys will be in the 
neighborhood of one hundred thousand dol- 
lars. 

SHIPPING — San Francisco is getting its 
share of what shipping is moving over the 
Seven Seas. The shipping strike is practic- 
ally over and vessels are not interfered with. 
Last week a number of vessels cleared for 
foreign ports, and in the coming week sev- 
eral new freighters and passenger vessels will 
leave on their appointed routes. The Toyo 
Kisen Kaisha has placed a new and faster 
vessel on the run between this port and Val- 
paraiso, Chile. The Harrison Direct Line 
will have two small freighters in very shortly 
to load for the United Kingdom. Suzki & 
Company are bringing in a lot of Japanese 
coal. This coal is consigned to a local coal 
company and is shipped here from Darien. 
Coastal business is improving, and with the 
strike ended the lumber business should im- 
prove generally. 

One of the notables in the shipping and 
exporting and importing line on a visit to San 
Francisco last week, and who is now on his 
way to Seattle, is J. T. Lilly of the firm of 
Norton, Lilly & Co. of New York and San 
Francisco. 

V ¥ ¥ 

A general rate cutting is being predicted 
and expected. This has been precipitaled by 
the action of the Mitsui people who have, it 



is said, accepted a cargo of tea for San 
Francisco from Yokohama for one-half of 
what British or American vessels would quote 
to carry it. In some quarters, rate cutting 
would be made most welcome as a possible 
spur to business. In other quarters, it is said, 
that no amount of rate cutting can stimulate 
business until such time as the exchange sit- 
uation is bettered and other conditions lend 
themselves to an improvement of business on 
the seas. In the meantime, those who in- 
c'u'ge in rate cutting are taking part in a most 
expensive pastime. It hrs been known for 
some time that there was a cutting of rates, 
but this has at no time been serious enough 
to call for general comment. Now it begins 
to look as if, with improvement in business, 
there is to be a real rate war. 

INSURANCE— The Milwaukee Mechanics. 
Milwaukee, will establish a California head- 
quarters. This company was formerly ac- 
tive in California but withdrew. It is now 
returning, according to Mr. Bird, the vice- 
president, recently in San Francisco, to the 
land of milk and honey. Detailed plans for 
the coast have not as yet been announced. 

The Capital Fire of Sacramento has closed 
a deal by which it will reinsure its entire 
business with the Royal. 

The invitation extended by the San Fran- 
cisco Brokers' Exchange to the California 
Association of Insurance Agents has been 
most cordially received. Applications for 
membership are already on file. The Brok- 
ers' Exchange and the Northern California 
Agents are planning to attend the meeting 
of the National Association in September, in 
Los Angeles. As we have remarked before, 
either the Yale or the Harvard will be char- 
tered for the occasion. 

In years gone by several questions have 
gone the rounds among the people which 
have remained unanswered. One of these 
was, "Who struck Billy Patterson?" and an- 
other was, "Is worms snakes puos?" In the 
insurance world, somebody in New York has 
started a question going, and it is as follows: 
"What is Zapupe?" And an Eastern news- 
paper says that, while in no dictionary or 
cyclopaedia, it means a "hard fibre." C. C. 
Dominge and W. 0. Lincoln give that defini- 
tion in "Fire Insurance Inspection and Un- 
derwriting." So, now, you know what "Za- 
pupe" is. 

MINING — There is a great deal of invest- 
ment of large and small capital in oil min- 
ing going on all of the time. In metals min- 
ing there is a very quiet season, and I lie pie- 
diction made, last winter, that this was to be 
one of the greatest of the discovery, develop- 
ment and production years in gold and silver 
mining is not at all likely lo be carried out. 
* * * 

The daily papers have contained an ac- 
count of charges supposed to have been 
brought against the backers of Broken Hills. 
Graham Rice is said to have been the moving 
spirit in this deal, and the public has been 
beguiled into subscribing for shares in this 



California Advertiser for July 23, 1921 



company through the ancient device of 
"wash sales." It is almost astounding how 
easily Rice managed, if the stories told in 
the press are true. Rice has a record stretch- 
ing clear across the country. He is alleged 
to have started in life as one Herzig. At 
one time, it is said, his firm carried the name 
of Maxim Gay and had its headquarters in 
New Orleans. From Canada to the Gulf and 
from New York to San Francisco Herzig- 
Gay-Rice has gone his merry way, sometimes 
hindered and sometimes punished. He has 
been promoter and publisher, and, except 
for some queer quirk of the brain, might have 
been a great financial genius. Where he will 
bob up next, no one knows. As long as the 
"sucker lists" last Rice will be able to "put 
something over." There is one born every 
day. 



HAS LLOYD GEORGE BAMBOOZLED 
THEM? 

A special dispatch to the New York Her- 
ald from Canada sheds a flood of light on the 
Imperial conference in London, of which so 
much was expected by the British Colonies. 
The Canadian Premier went to the confer- 
ence vowing that unless the Anglo-Japanese 
alliance was arranged in a way satisfactory 
to the United States, Canada would not ac- 
cept it. The Premier of Australia was equal- 
ly frank and friendly to the United States 
and so was the New Zealand Premier. But 
it seems that the things have happened in a 
way much different from what the British 
colonials expected. Instead of their standing 
up and dictating to John Bull what he should 
do, Mr. Bull has signified to the colonial 
premiers that he is capable of running his 
own imperial affairs. 

Most startling of all, the Colonial Premi- 
ers have not had a chance to say a word 
about the Anglo-Japanese treaty, for Lloyd 
George informed them that it was not a mat- 
ter to come before the Conference. In other 
words, the Treaty was not to lapse in July 
as they expected. It had not been "de- 
ncunced" in the usual manner of treaties 
about to lapse and consequently was to re- 
main in effect another year. According to 
the Herald's special dispatch: 

"Bamboozled" is the word used by some 
Canadian newspapers to lie it has 

been done to Premiers Meighen ol Canada 
and Smuts of South Africa by Mr. Lloyd 
George in connection with the Japanese Al- 
liance. 

"Mr. Meighen left Canada understanding 
thai the chief item for discussion at the Im- 
perial Conference would be the renewal of 
the treaty, which otherwise, it waa under- 
stood, would automatically terminate on 
July 1 3. both parties to it having intimated 
that as it stood the treaty was not in conson- 
ance with the League of Nations. 

"The Dominions, not consulted when the 
original treaty was drafted, were neverthe- 
less bound by it. As lor its renewal, they 
were to 'be consulted. Much emphasis on 
this consultation has been used in recent 
months by Downing Street. 

"The charge is made here (Toronto) that 
the 'consultation' would reveal a demand 
from the dominions for the renewal of the 



treaty, at least from Hughes and Massey of 
Australia, with acquiscence or at worst feeble 
resistance from Meighen and Smuts and that 
this demand would furnish an excuse for re- 
newal of the treaty in the eyes of American 
opinion. 

"Proceedings of the conference have for 
the most part been secret, but it is known 
that the opposition that came from Meighen 
and Smuts was of no perfunctory sort. 

"Then the amazing announcement came 
that the treaty wasn't going to lapse on July 
at all; that there having been no formal de- 
nunciation it would continue automatically 
in force for another year. 

"One inference from this interpretation of 
the incident is that consultation with the do- 
minions on foreign affairs is sought only 
when the result of the consultation will serve 
the purposes of the British Foreign Office. 
When the consultation doesn't result as ex- 
pected, the need for it is abolished — in this 
case by a decision of the Lord Chancellor. 

"The charge that has been made in respect 
to the allegation as to the treatment of Am- 
erican opinion and the bamboozling of the 
Crnadian Premier can scarcely be left where 
it is." 



11 

After Bigger Game — "It certainly does 
beat all," said the fat plumber, "what 
changes the automobile busniess has brought 
about." 

"Yes," the thin carpenter agreed; "good 
roads are nearly everywhere now." 

"I wasn't thinking of the roads." 

"What's the main idee, then?" 

"I was thinking of the effect on crime." 

"What effect has the automobile business 
on crime?" 

"It has greatly reduced the number of rob- 
beries." 

"Indeed! " 

"Yes; or, rather, the style of robberies." 

"In what way?" 

"The burglar who used to break into a 
brnk or store now takes his little bag of 
tools and opens a repair shop." — Film Fun. 



Hesitant Hubby — "Myrtle's husband is 
really a nice man, but so vacillating." 

"How do you know?" 

"Myrtle says he spent a full hour yester- 
day trying to decide whether he would wash 
the car, the dog or the baby." — Film Fun. 



Trouble Certain — They tell a little story 
that throws some light on the kind of liquor 
that is handed out in a drinking-place of the 
metropolis. 

A stranger in the city went up to a bar- 
keeper and ordered a drink. 

After serving the stranger the barkeeper 
immediately grabbed him by the collar and 
hustled him to the door. 

"Whaddye putting me out for?" the 
stranger demanded, indignantly. "I ain't 
started nothin' yet." 

"I know," the barkeep replied, "but you 
are going to in a minute." — Youngstown 
Telegram. 



Boatman: No, mister, I can't let you have 
a boat just now. There's a heavy swell 
just come on. 

Profiteer: Swell be hanged! Ain't my 
money as good as 'is? — Pearson's Weekly 
(London). 



The Adjusting Habit — Widow: Do you 
mean to. tell me that you won't pay me this 
$10,000 life insurance policy that my hus- 
band carried for twenty years? 

Adjuster (formerly with a fire insurance 
company) : That's what I said. Be reason- 
able, madam. We must take off 95 per cent 
for depreciation. You must admit that your 
husband at the lime he died wasn't in as 
good shape as when he took out this policy. 
— Film Fun. 



SAFE READY PORTABLE LIGHT IN YOUR HOME 



The Quick- Lite W Electric Lantern 




The most wonderful home convenience on the market today 

JISK YOUR DEALER TO SHOW IT 

No Matches, No Wick, No Oil, No Dirt, No Delay, No Danger 
Two Bulbs, Two Batteries, Two Colors 



A-| r f\ I" hone— enn- form — oa the roed -everywhere 
\f hM Need a QUICK-LITE III' rRIC LANTERN I'-, 



v., I ., ..it li K I ITE I 
plete \, ith Duplex Bai 



trr\. 7", hour- intermittent burning: 



$7,50 



Kwick-Lite Electric Corporation 

Kwick-Lite Building, 360 Kearny St. 

Department 3S-X 



12 



San Francisco News Letter and 




ociot 



ett, Mrs. Alexander Hamilton and Mrs. Law- 
rence McCreery. 



THE marriage of Miss Lorna Williamson 
and Mr. Andrew Talbot will take place 
the latter part of September. It will 
be a large church wedding, but the arrange- 
ments have not been completed. 

Mr. and Mrs. Willard Williamson and their 
daughter returned Tuesday from New York 
and Europe, and are at the Fairmount. Mr. 
Talbot will come from Boston next month to 
remain until after the wedding. He will take 
his bride to Europe for their honeymoon and 
they will travel for several months and will 
eventually return to San Francisco to live. 

Mr. Talbot has not been in California for 
several years. He and his mother, Mrs. An- 
drew Pope Talbot, moved to Boston and he 
has been at Harvard College. He is related 
to the Pope and Talbot families here. 

The marriage of Miss Margaret Madison 

and Mr. Wakefield Baker will take place the 
second week in September at St. Luke's 
Church, and will be a large affair. There 
will be several bridesmaids, among them Miss 
Caroline Madison and Miss Anne Bibblee. The 
Madisons are spending the summer at their 
home in Ross Valley and will not move to 
town before the wedding. 

The wedding of Miss Anne Bibblee and 

Mr. Frederick Beaver, whose engagement 
was announced at the same time as that of 
Miss Madison and Mr. Baker, will take place 
the first week in October. 



Dinners 

Mr. Frank D. Madison gave a large din- 
ner Friday evening at Pastori's in Marin 
county to celebrate the birthday of Mr. 
Frank D. Anderson. About forty friends 
from Ross Valley and San Rafael were there, 
including Mr. and Mrs. Anderson, Mr. and 
Mrs. Alexander Lilley, Mr. and Mrs. Ken- 
neth Kingsbury, Mr. and Mrs. Henry E. Both- 




139-153 GEARY ST. 

\martjlpparel 

ron (JJomen 

and u\jsses 



Style? atvcl Quality 
\Vitkovit ExtpaVaJan.c 





in. Miss Louise Boyd, Mr. and Mrs. Forest 
Cary, Mrs. Truxton Beale, Mr. and Mrs. Sew- 
ard McNear, Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Crooks, 
Miss Maude Fay, Mr. and Mrs. George W. 
Kelham, Mrs. William Babcock, Mr. and Mrs. 
Harrison Dibblee and others. 
Miss Ellita Adams was hostess at an in- 
formal dinner and dance at the Adams home 
in town on Tuesday evening. The party was 
in compliment to Miss Evelyn Merriman of 
Baltimore and Miss Mary Emma Flood. 

Colonel and Mrs. E. P. Orton were hosts 

at a small dinner party at their quarters in 
the Presidio on Wednesday evening, enter- 
taining in honor of Major and Mrs. William 
Robert White, who have received orders to 
go to Camp Dix, New Jersey. Major and 
Mrs. White are leaving within a few weeks. 
Colonel and Mrs. Thomas Pearce and Col- 
onel and Mrs. Moore Falls were the other 
guests. 



Dance* 

Miss Katherine Bradley gave a large 

dance Friday evening at her home in San 
Rafael. It was a farewell to some of her 
friends, as she and her mother, Mrs. Ernest 
Bradley, will leave soon for Europe. They 
will spend a year abroad and will go first 
to France and Switzerland, where Miss Brad- 
ley will complete her education. Later they 
will visit Mrs. Bradley's relatives in England. 



Parties 

Mrs. Nion Tucker gave a party Friday 

at her home in Burlingame to celebrate the 
second birthday of her little daughter. Nan 
Tucker. About thirty children from Burlin- 
game and San Mateo were there and their 
mothers were also invited. Games were 
played and there was a large birthday cake 
with two candles. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. Moore are en- 
tertaining friends over the week-end at their 
country place at Santa Cruz. The guests in- 
clude some of the emn and women connected 
with Mr. Moore as Director General of the 
Exposition in 1915. In the party are Mr. 
and Mrs. Gaillard Stoney, Judge and Mrs. 
Charles W. Slack. Mrs. Frederick Sanborn 
and Miss Laura McKinstry. 

Mr. Raymond Armsby's birthday was 

celebrated Wednesday by two parties. His 
brother. Mr. Gordon Armsby, gave a picnic 
in the hills back of Burlingame and enter- 
tained some of the young people down the 
peninsula. In the evening Dr. and Mrs. Max 
Rothschild gave a dinner at their Burlingame 
home for Mr. Armsby. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jean de St. Cyr, who re- 
lumed from the East on Sunday, entertained 
the members of the Thursday Poker Club at 
her home in San Mateo. Among the mem- 
bers of the clubs are Mrs. George T. Marye, 
Mrs. Bernard Ford, Mrs. Frederick W. Pritch. 



Luncheons 

Mrs. Marshall Williams gave a luncheon 

party on Thursday in honor of Miss Margaret 
Williams, whose engagement to Dr. Robert 
Lewis Irvine Smith of Pasadena was an- 
nounced at a tea given by Mrs. Zlia Williams 
last Saturday at their home at Los Gatos. 
The William S. Kuhn home in Burlin- 
game was the scene Monday afternoon of an 
informal luncheon at which the Misses Kuhn 
entertained a few of their friends from town 
and the peninsula. 



In Town and Out 

Mr. and Mrs. Milo Robbins have sev- 
eral friends as their guests over the week-end 
at Palo Alto, where they have rented a house 
for the summer. The party includes Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry Washington Dodge, Miss Mary 
Gorgas, Miss Thelma Saunders and Mr. 
Frazer Bailey. 

Mrs. Henry J. Crocker and Miss Marian 

Crocker have returned from Coronado, where 
they spent several weeks and are at their 
home in Buchanan Street. Later they will 
go to the Crocker ranch at Cloverdale. 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Park returned 

Wednesday to their home in Burlingame from 
Santa Barbara, where thev visited Mr. Park's 
father. Dr. C. C. Park. Mrs. Park's brother, 
Edward H. Clark Jr. ?nd Mrs. Clark are also 
back in Burlingame. They have been in the 
East for the past six weeks and returned last 
week. Mr. and Mrs. Clark Sr. are here from 
New York and spent the week-end in Bur- 
lingame with their son. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roderick Tower have re- 
turned to C?lifornia from the East and are 
in Los Angeles, where they occupy the resi- 
dence of Mrs. Nathaniel Wilshire. During 
their absence they visited Mrs. Tower's 
father, Mr. Harry Payne Whitney, and Mr. 

When in Santa Clara Valley, see the Val- 
ley from the scenic electric lines. 

Trolley trips start from San Jose or Palo 
Alto. 

PENINSULA RAILWAY CO. 
San Jose, Cal. 



Tk 



FOR 



EM@D^»n3fl' 



.@nnfe> 



Halsey E. Manwaring 




California Advertiser for July 23, 1921 



13 



Tower's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charlemagne 
Tower. 

Mrs. Charles Butters of Piedmont and 

Mrs. Wendell P. Hammon have gone to San- 
la Barbara for a month and are at El Mi- 
rasol. They have a number of friends in 
Santa Barbara, among them Mrs. Harry 
Howard Webb, who gave a tea for them last 
Sunday at her home. 

Miss Ruth Hcbart has gone to Lake Ta- 

hoe to join her father, Mr. Walter Hobart, 
at his summer lodge. Next month, Mr. Wal- 
ter Hobart Jr. will arrive from the East to 
spend a month with his father and sister at 
the lake. Miss Hobart and her brother will 
leave for Philadelphia in September, to be 
present at the wedding of Miss Hannah Ho- 
bart and Mr. Leonard Prince of Chicago, 
which will take place at the home of the 
bride's mother, Mrs. Charles Wheeler. 

Mrs. Philip Van Home Lansdale has 

gone to the mountains near the Yosemite Val- 
ley for a several weeks' stay. She will re- 
turn to town about the first of September and 
will leave for the East a little later. She 
has rented her house on Broadway to Mrs. 
Virginia Maddox, who is spending the sum- 
mer in Los Gatos. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick W. McNear 

(Emma Butler Breeden) were at Wawona, 
enjoying the golf and other diversions. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Clay Miller of Palo 

Alto have taken a house in Carmel for the 
summer. 

Mrs. Frederick Henshaw left last Satur- 
day for the Russian River, where she will 
visit Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Piexotto at their 
cottage. 

Mrs. Veronica Baird has returned from 

New York and is at the Fairmont. She went 
East several months ago and her grand- 
daughter. Miss Marie Louise Baldwin, went 
with her. Miss Baldwin is now visiting her 
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Baldwin, in New- 
port. 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert J. Dibblee and their 

daughter are spending a month at Lake la- 
hoe, where they have rented the cottage of 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Poett. who are spend- 
ing the summer in Europe. 

Mrs. Julius Krutlschnitt Jr. is here from 

her home in Arizona visiting her parents. Mr. 
and Mrs. Frederick M. Pickering. A string 
of small affairs has been given to welcome 
Mrs. Krutlschnitt. 

Mrs. Jack Harligan. who is home from 

an arduous campaign of war work in Poland 
and elsewhere, is taking a well-earned rest. 
She is visiting Mrs. George Barr Baker at 
the Burlingame Country Club. Both of these 
women have inspired a round of affairs to 
welcome them. 



r 



"BEAUTY SALON"— 
THE POWDER PUFF— 

Now under New Management 

Hair restored to its natural color. 

Hair Dyeing and Bleaching. 

Kalherine McNamara — Marcel Waver 

Inei Dere. formerly of the City of Paris 

212 Stockton St. Suite 305 



intimations 

Friends of Clemente Fatjo will be 

grieved to hear of his serious illness. Mr. 
and Mrs. Fatjo are at Los Gatos for the 
summer. 

Letters of sympathy are being sent to 

Mrs. Frederick Forest Peabody for the death 
of her mother, Mrs. Thomas Burke, which 
occurred in Santa Barbara on Monday. The 
late Mrs. Burke, who was an English woman, 
was often in San Francisco. 
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred S. Tubbs, Mrs. Wil- 
liam B. Tubbs and Miss Emily Tubbs write 
interestingly of their visit in Naples, Italy. 
They plan to be in London for a few weeks 
before returning to San Francisco late in 
the summer. 

Mrs. Willard Chamberlin is being given 

a cordial welcome at a round of small social 
affairs that are pleasant reunions of her 
friends. 

On Monday Mrs. Bernard Ford had a pic- 
nic party for Mrs. Chamberlin. On Wednes- 
day evening Mr. and Mrs. Paul Fagan had 
a few friends at a dinner dance at the Hotel 
St. Francis. 



PALACE HOTEL BOOMS BRIDGE 

The Palace Hotel began a very active 
"Bridge the Bay" campaign of its own this 
week. As the hotel has been a potential fig- 
ure in the history making of San Francisco, 
the management decided to get whole-heart- 
edly back of the bridge the bay movement. 

On the menu cards "bridge" illustrations 
are appearing. Emil Burgermeister. the chef 
at the Palace Hotel, has arranged a series of 
special dishes, such as "Bridge Soup," 
"Bridge Cake." and others. 

One of the most unique features of the 
Palace Hotel campaign is the efforts of Vic- 
tor Goeffrion. leader of the Rose Room Or- 
chestra, and Oliver Alberti, his talented vio- 
linist, a composer of note. GeofTrion and Al- 
berti collaborated and arranged a catchy 
"bridge" medley in which is featured "Lon- 
don's Bridge Is Falling Down." In this med- 
ley they carry out the idea, "San Francisco's 
bridge is building up." 

Every department of the hotel is contrib- 
uting a feature to the campaign. 



EVERY DAY MORE POPULAR 

The Melody Masters are becoming more 
popular every day at Cafe Marquard. the 
"Parisian Cafe of reputation." Geary and 
Mason streets, for their wonderful dance mu- 
sic. Lucky are the patrons of Cafe Mar- 
quard. for they have the best of life's pleas- 
ures offered to them- -food to please a sy- 
barite, music and entertainment, that is an 
instant cure for business cares, and dancing 
that gives expression to the joy of life. What 
more could any man want. Never is any pat- 
ron with a torpid liver and a gloomy outlook 
on life found grumbling at Cafe Marquard. 
Trie prices are as pleasing as the quality of 
the viands and the perfect service. Would 
that the world had many a place like Cafe 
Marquard. but it takes the experience of a 
lifetime, and special talent in many directions 
to make even one. 

The Grand Prize Revue with Walter Em- 
erson and Caprice Ardonne is a wonderful 
succ 



JtiffiHOOH 



c==x= 



Hotel 
St Rands 

Four to Six 
6KIENTAL, SERVICE 



ChanqeofMenuDail 



M 



1 



.Music by 

ferdinand Stark's* 

Orchestra 

Thos. J. Coleman-Tnanacrer 



J. E. BIRMINGHAM 

* » * 

PALACE HOTEL 

* » * 

JEWELS 

» * * 

REMODELING 

* * ♦ 

UNIQUE DESIGNS 

* • » 

FINE JEWELRY 
» » • 

EXPERT 



Main Corridor 

* * * 

Opposite Rose Room 

* ¥ * 

In Platinum 

* » * 

Old Styles Into New 

* * ♦ 

Time-Keeping Watches 

* » * 

Of All Descriptions 

* * * 

Repair Work 



ELECTROLYSIS 

Eye-brows arched and moles, warts and su- 
perfluous hair permanently removed by my 
latest improved multiple needle machine. 
Work guaranteed. 

MADAM STIVER 

133 Geary Si.. Whitney Building. Suite 723 

Phone Douglas 5232 

Oakland. First Nat. Bank Bldg. 

Suite 424. Phone Oakland 2521 



A TREATMENT FOR THE SCALP 
AND HAIR. Scientifically correct, cosme- 
tically perfect, established and conducted by 
American Hospital Nurses, unqualifiedly en- 
dorsed and used by Eminent Physicians. 

THE FRANCES FOX INSTITUTE 

For the Scientific Care of the Hair 

San*506CnK>«BdUis* Phooe Sonet 51 18 

Al Market At Port Sts.. San Ftaadseo 



14 



San Francisco News Letter and 




^^atomohilQ 



for the motor industry. The Cadillac factory 
is now within twelve cars a day of its capa- 
city and will soon produce 125 cars a day. 
The factory is keeping up the highest stand- 
ards in construction and style. 



Cheaper Cars Demanded 

THE business slump is causing serious 
thoughts about the need of reducing 
the size and cost of automobiles. Wise 
men say that we are not likely to have a re- 
turn of the era of financial extravagance — 
at least not for some time. 

The old notion that the world had reached 
a new level is fading rapidly. It used to be 
that nobody asked prices. Now price is the 
first question, and in too many cases is tco 
high to please the customers. There is com- 
plaint in every direction. 

The wise car dealer now is one prepared 
to meet the demands of a more economical 
public. Dealers in automobiles cannot offer 
the splendid American cars of the first rank 
at bargain prices for the multitude. The cost 
has been too great. Economy was not what 
was looked for. The desideratum was excel- 
lence of quality, splendor of appearance, 
durability and speed. All those qualities are 
guaranteed in the high-priced cars now. 

The dealers are looking to a cheaper mar- 
ket and will have to find smaller and lighter 
cars, less speed and little pretense to style, 
to please purchasers with slender purses. No 
one confessed to having a slender purse in 
recent years. We were all wearing the airs 
of millionaires. 

Who can produce a car which will com- 
bine the qualities calculated to find ready 
sale amongst the economical? The immedi- 
ate answer might be "Henry Ford," but ex- 
perienced and enterprising as he is. the field 
is too vast for him alone to fill. There will 
be room for many Henry Fords, and no 
doubt many men will aspire to become car 
manufacturers for the populace. For it is 
unthinkable that the people having once ac- 
quired the motor habit can ever lose it. The 
new style of car for economical buyers mu-l 
be somewhere about $1 COO, and have all 
that can be furnished for that price. Of 
course, it will not be a flyer, or a miracle of 
elegance, but if it can give the economical 
purchaser a reasonable amount of pleasure 
and wear it will receive a great deal of pa- 
tronage. The lower the price the better for 
trade. Perhaps we may begin to hear of 
cheap cars such as were undreamt of a few 
years ago. We shall see. 



Now With Anderson Company 

Charles B. Shanks, wide'v and well known 
among all the old-timers, has become affili- 
ated with the Anderson Motor Company, 
Rock Hill, S. C, in the capacity of vice- 
president, where he will have general suDer- 
vision of sales and advertising. Shanks dates 
way back to the days when he was sales 
manager of the old F. B. Stearns Company 



in Cleveland, where he later distinguished 
himself as advertising manager of the Win- 
ton Motor Carriage Company, as the present 
Winton Motor Car Company was then 
known. In recent years his activities have 
been entirely devoted to the publishing field, 
but he has retained his trade acquaintance 
and broadened his knowledge of the industry, 
sd that he brings to his new post a wide 
range of experience. 



Certainly a "Knockout" 

The new Elgin roadster is certainly a 
knockout. For real style and class you posi- 
tively cennot find its equal. From radiator 
cap to tail-light it is a perfect fulfillment of 
the public demand for a distinctive two-pas- 
senger car that will combine smart lines with 
reliable and economical performance. 

The Elgin roadster is offered in two colors, 
chrome yellow and sage-brush green. Hand- 
some and durable Spanish leather will fur- 
nish the upholstery, its beautiful shade har- 
monizing perfectly with either of the stand- 
ard roadster colors. Special Elgin design 
individual steps are features. The sweeping 
lines of the fenders tend to add grace to the 
lines of the whole car. A roomy luggage 
compartment under the rear deck is acces- 
sible through a large side door provided with 
a strong lock. 

An extra-long gear-shift lever makes gear- 
shilling a pleasure. A racing-type radiator 
cap with motometer is standard equipment 
on all roadster models. Note the graceful 
lines of the top as shown in the above photo- 
graph. Five wire wheels are also standard 
on this model. 

With these many unusual features we be- 
lieve that the Elgin roadster will present an 
undeniable appeal to the motoring public. 
Rounding th<' Elgin line into completeness as 
it does, it gives the Elgin representative the 
ability to fulfill a request for any body stvle 

The new roadster will be ready for deliv- 
ery about July 15th and will be listed at 
$1795 (San Francisco). Further informa- 
tion on the roadster will be furnished on re- 
quest. 



Cadillac People Optimistic 

Phil T. Prather, who is manager of the 
Don 1 ee concern in San Francisco, has re- 
turned from Detroit and revels in our brac- 
ing ocean breezes after sweltering in the 
torried wave beyond the "Rockies." Prather 
went to Detroit to attend the annual summer 
conference of the Cadillac distributors. The 
meeting this year was held in the new Cadil- 
lac factory, and was attended bv all the dis- 
tributors in the United States. Reports from 
all places gave assurance of a bright future 



Auto Dealers Claim Loss 

From Indianapolis comes the report that 
many of the Indiana salesmen for the Dodge 
Brothers car are disgruntled with the action 
of the company in reducing prices June 8 
and are trying to force a meeting of the 
hoard of directors of the Indiana Automotive 
Trade Association to trke action in their own 
behalf. The cause of complaint, according 
to word received here from various state 
dealers, is the fact that reducing the price 
crused serious money loss to manv dealers 
who had guaranteed prices for the year. 
These dealers who had guaranteed nrices say 
that about two weeks before the price reduc- 
tion announcement was made, they sent <~\A 
letters to prospects and others guaranteeing 
the price. This was done, they declare, be- 
cause they were given to understand by the 
company that th»re would be no change in 
rrces. when in fact, thev allege, the stock- 
h-l'ers of the comnan" had voted a month 
- : o to the time the letters were sent out 
by dealers to reduce prices. 

According to present plans, the state sec- 
retary expects to call a meeting of the board 
of directors some time in September, to make 
arrangements for a state meeting later in the 
vear. probbly in December, but in case the 
D'dge Brothers dealers are successful in 
forcing the issue, the board meeting may be 
advanced. 



24.77 Miles on Gallon of Gas 

In an enclosed car cross-country contest 
at Chicago, conducted by the Elgin Motor 
Car Corporation, and participated in bv deal- 
ers in various parts of the country. 7.1 cars 
covering a total distance of 3185.77 miles 
made an average of 24.77 miles to the gal- 
lon of gasoline. The average distance cov- 
ered by each car was slightly over 150 miles. 
One of the objects of the contest was to de- 
termine the utility of the enclosed car for 
cress-country touring. 



Hughson Man of Vision 
Everybody is admiring (he new Fod sales- 
rooms and service concern opened at the cor- 
ner of Eleventh rnd Market streets by Wil- 
liam L. Hughson. It certainlv looks like solid 
business and real progress. Thee is no finer 
location or better managed establishment in 
the United Slates. 

One needs but a glance at Mr. Hughson's 
new salesrooms to realize what an improve- 
ment he has made in the selection of his 
place of business, rnd the food use he has 
made of h's opoortunities. He is one of the 
bright business men, who can see that Mar- 
ket street is the great thoroughfare of our 
metropolis. The statician of Philadelohia. 
row visiting our city, predicts that San 
Francisco will grow more in the next ten 
vears than it hrs done in the past thirty. 
Strangers notice the signs of progress more 
than residents. It was so in Los Angeles, 
which was a sleepy village until the people 



California Advertiser for July 23, 1921 



15 



of the Middle West and Eastern states began 
to pour in. 

What makes Mr. Hughson's new establish- 
ment so desirable is that we are on the eve 
of a great development in the San Maleo 
suburb. Sleps are about to be taken to pro- 
vide better electric service so that the sub- 
urbs in San Mateo will grow rapidly. That 
will occur just as soon as our population can 
reach them, without having to make a long 
trip to Third and Townsend streets. For 
owners of automobiles the Peninsular sub- 
urbs are now ideal. All the motor cars in the 
suburbs pass Eleventh and Market streets. 

Mr. Hughson has chosen his location well. 
He is a man of vision. His new establish- 
ment is a credit to him and his city. 



Hints for Motorists 

Watch the brushes of the generator occa- 
sionally to see if they are sparking. This 
may be due to: dirty commutator, rough 
from burning; high mica, or worn out of 
true. The brushes may not be properly 
fitted, they may be stuck in the guide, have 
a weak spring, or be used up. When spark- 
ing is noticed have the trouble investigated 
immediately as the commutator will be badly 
damaged and the battery will not receive the 
proper charge. 

If you have a vacuum tank on the fuel 
line of your car do not neglect to drain the 
water pocket occasionally. This also helps 
to clear it of sediment. There is usually a 
water pocket in the bottom of the carburetor, 
which should also have an occasional clean- 
ing. If these precautions are neglected ycu 
will s'oner or later have trouble which will 
stop the engine and may lake some time to 
locate. 



Do not neglect to try the brakes every 
time you take the car out. Choose a mo- 
ment when the way is clear ahead and then 
speed up and try the service brake. After 
this try the emergency brake. Do boll 
several times. It is a good plan to have some 
one stand where he can watch the wheels as 
the car stops. If one wheel continues to re- 
volve and the olher one locks and slides, the 
brakes are badly out of adjustment. The 
loose one should be tightened until hnlh hold 
evenly and neither of them lock when the 
ca 1 is stopped. 



During the hot weather it is advisable to 
try the fan belt occasionally, for il thai is 
loose the engine will heat. If the fan ran 
be mo ed easily or will spin il it is gi\en ■ 
start, the belt is too loose and should be 
tightened immediately. This does not apply 
to belts that have an automatic take up de- 
Sice. 



Il you have not already done so. clean out 

the cooling system. Dissolve two pounds of 

washing soda (one pound for a Ford or other 

smill engine) in hot water and pour into the 

radiator, tilling up with fresh water. Run 

ii as usual all day and drain out that 

night Fill with fresh water Mid change again 

y. This will go I lone way 

I preventing overheating in summer. 



RAPACIOUS THEATRICAL UNIONS 

The New York theatrical managers are 
complaining that owing to the high cast of 
producing new plays, it will be impossible to 
send many on the road this season. The the- 
atrical unions, it is said, have helped to bring 
on the stagnation. Formerly the producers 
in New York, skinned everybody — authors, 
actors, and mechanics. Now the unions have 
turned the tables on the managers and are 
going in the other extreme, if one can be- 
lieve the appended letter from the Repertory 
Theatre — a combination of actors which had 
obtained permission to produce plays of 
" John Ferguson." 

"Previous to opening, the manager was 
visited by innumerable applicants for posi- 
tions of electrician, stage carpenter and prop- 
el ty man. As the theatre had a permanent 
staff of such employes, and as "John Fergu- 
son is acted throughout in one scene, each 
applicant was informed that no additional 
crew would be needed or engaged. The union 
representing these stage employes, thereupon 
announced to the cooperative organization 
that according to their rules and regulations 
the company would be required to duplicate 
these employes, because, some years ago, the 
play, with another cast, another production 
and another management, had been sent on 
tour. In vain it was explained that the com- 
pany was a duly organized and bona fide re- 
pertory company, that it had taken honest 
title to the property, and that the play had 
never, under the management of the present 
Repertory Theatre Company, been sent on 
tour or elsewhere. 

"To shorten the story, the union insisted 
upon its demrnd; a duplicate crew of em- 
ployes were engaged at the road salaries of 
$62.50 each, and the play was produced. 
Thus we found two men for each position, 
and nothing for any of them to do. But lis- 
ten! At the end of the week an extra bill 
was presented for a new employe, a curtain 



raiser, for $30! With a double crew of em- 
ployes, two carpenters, two electricians and 
two of everything where there had been one 
before, it was found that it was the duty of 
none to raise and lower the curtain. It was 
admitted that to have done so would not 
have been a violation of the many and mys- 
terious union rules, but none of these rules 
specifically stipulated that it was the duty of 
either of the road or house crew to raise the 
curtain. The amount involved was not great, 
but for a cooperative organization, composed 
of acting players financing their own enter- 
prise, this seemed to point to disaster. There 
was no insurance that the subsequent de- 
mands wculd not be equally as ridiculous, 
unjust and unreasonable. This is one of the 
demands of labor which makes the business 
precarious, and causes more than one am- 
bitious and youthful producer to hesitate 
when he thinks of joining the ranks." 



Explained — A guest in a Florida hotel 
complained to the manager: 

"Your restaurant is conducted in a very 
rotten way. At lunch today I found a hair 
in the ice-cream, a hair in the honey, and a 
hair in the apple-sauce." 

"Well, you see," the manager explained, 
"the hair in the ice-cream came from the 
shaving of the ice. The hair in the honey 
came. I suppose, from the comb. But I can't 
for the life of me understand about the hair 
in the apple-sauce, for I bought those apples 
myself, and they were all Baldwins. — De- 
troit Free Press. 



The Lay of the Land — "Jones," said 
Brown, "do you know that there are two 
kin's of chickens?" 

"Yes," laughed Jones, "poultry and hu- 
man." 

"And alike in one big respect?" 

"How's that?" 

"Both kinds laying for mankind." 



CASA DEL REY, 



Santa Cruz 
California 



THE MILLION DOLLAR FIREPROOF HOTEL 

The ideal spot for your summer outing with its warm beach bathing: dancing: 
good music: artistic, home-like, spacious lobby. 

This is a most wonderful place for children. Beautiful playgrounds; sanitary 
warm bathing pool; swimming instructors: saddle ponies for children. Special 
kitchenette where maid can prepare food for young children. 

Motor reads in line condition via Sargents. Chittenden Pass and Watsonville, 
or the Coast Route via La Honda. The Southern Pacific offers special round trip, 
week-end rates as well ,-s tickets good for several weeks. 

Cottage City, operated on the European plan, is also under the same manage- 
ment as Casa Del Rey. 

Correspondence regarding rates for families with maids and children solicited. 
Special rates by the week or for extended stays of a month or two. Address: 

CASA DEL REY, Santa Cruz, Calif. 

MORRIS & WARNER. 'Proprietors 
Phone 6O0 



16 



San Francisco News Letter and 



Pl/EASURI/S WAND 

"Obey no wand but pleasure's — Tom Moore. 





Orpheum 

Back on his old stamping-ground, Tom 
Wise appeas in a pleasing little skit, "Mem- 
ories," ably supported by Nila Mac, Ralph 
Belmont and Pickering Brown. The plot is 
simple and deals with the casual adventure 
of an old though affluent actor. The humor 
is mild and entertaining. 

Singer's Midgets are held over from last 
week and seem to be as well received as ever, 
while George Austin Moore, Kennedy and 
Francis also come in for a good share of ap- 
plause for two-weekers. 

Some good singing is offered by Marion 
Weeks and Henri Barron. Miss Weeks, a 
delicate soprano, is very acceptable in the 
numbers given. The short stunt by Harry 
Cavana and Nancy is cleverly executed. 



"Penrod's" Pranks at Alcazar 

The readers of Booth Tarkington's delight- 
fully amusing Penrod stories will find vast 
entertainment in their dramatization this 
week at the Alcazar. The selection of real 
children for the parts of Penrod and his 
friends was a clever stroke; not stage chil- 
dren, mind you, but real, live, human boys. 
Charles Metcalfe, in the title role, gave an 
excellent performance; Sumner Getchell, as 
his chum, Sam, was "just boy," and the two 
little negro neighbors, Herman and Verman, 
were impersonated by members of a race 
that loves nothing so well as "actin' up." 
The four acts are somewhat long drawn out. 
but most enjoyable. The Alcazar idol, Dud- 
ley Ayres, was relegated to inconspicuous pa- 
renthood, and Gladys George was only an 
older sister. They were both agreeable in 
the parts, however, and Leslie Virden was a 
sympathetic mother. Bert Chapman had a 
good opportunity as the young lover, but Mr. 
Chaprjian has very little sense of humor. 
Charles Yule immortalized the character of 
Jarge, the weak-witted cousin of the redoubt- 
able Delia (Anna MacNaughton). Miss Mac- 
Naughton lent the power of her great tal- 
ents, as well as a delicious bit of brogue, to 
the part of the much-tried cook in Penrod's 
family. Florence Printy, a mere maternal 
parent, we saw for a moment only, looking 
wonderfully pretty. Thomas Chatterton is 
certainly an ideal villain. The large cast 
was well fitted with suitable parts and the 
performance went off with the smoothness 
and finish that characterizes the work of the 
Alcazar management. 



Imperial 

"The Woman God Changed" well justifies 
a two-weeks' run. Seena Owen has an ex- 
cellent company and gives a fine display of 
her versatility in characterizations of caba- 
ret girl and the woman who has found her 
soul. Severi continues the musical features 
and other fill-ins contribute to the entertain- 
ment. 



California 

Speed, speed — "Too Much Speed." With 
all the excitement of a spill with his future 
father-in-law, a jail sentence, an elopment, 
no plot to involve one is needed. What- 
ever may be said of "Wally" Reid's pictures, 
humor abounds and one leaves the theatre 
without being wrecked morally. 



THE OLD STOCK COMPANY DEMANDED 

The situation in New York in the thea- 
trical business is so unpromising that man- 
agers and actors are discussing how provin- 
cial cities will get any road shows worth see- 
ing this year. The general impression is that 
the old style of local stock companies will 
come into favor again. There will be travel- 
ing stars who will make tours, and while they 
are playing an engagement the local stock 
companies willl make tours in their districts. 

Manager William A. Brady in r.dvocating 
that plan says: 

"The time is ripe for stock companies. In 
Los Angeles Morosco ran a play forty-one 
weeks. In San Francisco an original play 
ran twelve weeks. Many other cities are 
good for a six weeks' run. If a picture like 
"Way Down East" in Kansas City can run 
eight weeks, an original play produced by a 
stock company can do the same. 

"There is a healthy public demand for 
high-class plays and players — a demand thai 
is just as keen in Denver, New Orleans or 
Seattle as in New York. Why should they 
not see the "School for Scandal," "Diplo- 
macy" and "She Stoops to Conquer"? The 
only answer is because New York bars 
them." 



was written by Frank Mandel, author of 
"The High Cos! of Loving." the extremely 
amusing vehicle in which Kolb & Dill ap- 
peared here. It is alive with mirth and filled 
with absurd situations. As its name would 
indicate, there is a predominance of female 
characters, and supporting Gladys Cieorge 
and Dudley Ayres, who will assume the had- 
ing roles, will be Edna Conroy, specially en- 
gaged for the production. Miss Conroy was 
one of the stars in Robert Hilliard's recent 
success, "A Fool There Was." and has also 
Hayed leads with Wilton Lackaye. Henry 
Dixie and William Courtleigh. She comes 
here from Los Angeles to appear in the role 
of "Lucile Early," one of the most import- 
ant characters in the play. 

The story concerns itself with a young 
married man who allows his philanthropic 
tendencies to prevail over his good judgment. 



ORPHEUM OFFERINGS NEXT WEEK 

Gus Edwards, who has written more pop- 
ular songs than any other in the world, comes 
next week to the Orpheum in his Song Revue 
of 1921, which jumps direct from New York 
to San Francisco for the summer engage- 
ment. Gus brings a cast numbering thirty. 

Arthur Wanzer and Maybelle Palmer, skil- 
tologists. will present "She's Hard to Get 
Along With." 

Zuhn and Dreis. eccentric comedians, will 
offer a skit which is a healed family argu- 
ment. 

"Sandy" Edwards, "the wee Harry Lau- 
der," in imitations and Scottish folk songs. 

In their interpretative costumes the Clin- 
ton Sisters will give Chinese, Gypsy and 
Egyptian dances. 

Bailey and Cowan, with Miss Nile Mac, 
will remain another week. 



Alcazar's Nexf Bill 

Anoti'ui recent New York comedy success, 
"My Lady Friends,' will have its first San 
Francisco pioduction al the Alcazar, begin- 
ning next Sunday afternoon, July 24th. ft 



RICH REWARDS OF SUCCESS 

The leading actress in a successful music- 
al show in New York is now receiving a 
weekly salary of $1,750. The production is 
bringing its managers a profit of $10,000 a 
week, so there has been no expression of dis- 
satisfaction at the amount paid to her. But 
it is large for a young woman whose New 
York experience covers barely six years. 

Another actress from a musical play which 
has just closed its run intends after a while 
to prepare for the operatic stage. But she 
'ill sing for a few years more in operetta. 
If her salary continues what it is now she will 
soon have an income of $5,000 from her in- 
vestments. Such is the rate of compensation 
for the youthful favorites nowadays, especial- 
ly in the musical plays. 

But it must be borne in mind that these 
are the bright lights in the picture. There 
a e troops of girls who can hardly exist on 
their stage earnings. 



BIG SHOW GIRLS NEGLECTED 

The large, slowly moving stage beauty is 
rs htlle in demand now in musical comedy 



SAM FPAHC1SCO 



TWE 0«T W w **AV>Dfc<*\U.fe 




I 



MA E?v EES 25 AND 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 
Except Salt., Suns, and Holidays 

AND THE SAME GREAT SHOWS 



Smoking permitted in dress circle and 
loges. 



California Advertiser for July 23. 1921 



17 



as she is in vaudeville. Quite the opposite 
type is sought by the stage directors. The 
little, animated, fiery person with jazz in ev- 
ery gesture and expression is the kind of fe- 
minine aid that is now sought out. Nobody 
looks at the big girls any more. 



PERSONALS 

The death of Mrs. William T. Coleman 

occurred last Saturday in Monrovia. She 
was a daughter-in-law of Mrs. Edith Bland- 
ing Coleman and was formerly Miss Alice 
Young of Burlington, Iowa. She was mar- 
ried to Mr. Coleman in 1915 and they lived 
in Monrovia. 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis Davis, who have 

been motoring in Europe, write of their stay 
in Spain. They are visiting historic places of 
interest. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. K. Boisot, formerly of 

Chicago, are paying a visit to theii -laughter, 
Mrs. Byington Ford, at Del Monte. 

Miss Ida Bell Wheaton, who has made 

her home with her uncle, Mr. Silas Palmer, 
and Mrs. Palmer, since the death of her 
mother, the late Mrs. George Wheaton of 
Oakland, will go to New York to Miss 
Spence's school this year. She will leave in 
September with her cousin, Miss Julian 
Adams. 



Mrs. Bertram Nixon has bought the Jol- 

liffe house on Broadway and will take pos- 
session of it next month. Mrs. Nixon has 
lived for several years at the Nixon ranch 
in the Napa Valley, but since the death of 
Mr. Nixon, a few months ago, has spent 
much time in town. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Pickett Withers are 

spending their honeymoon in California and 
were guests of Mr. and Mrs. Willis Walker 
at their home at Pebble Beach over the 
week-end. They have gone to Santa Bar- 
brra to join Mr. and Mrs. John J. Mitchell 
Ir. (Lblita Armour). Mrs. Withers was Miss 
Margaret Pirie. an intimate friend of Mrs. 
Mitchell, and has been her guest at Santa 
Barbara several times during the past few 
years. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hooker have ar- 
rived in London and joined Mr. and Mrs. 
Osgood Hooker, Miss Aileen Mcintosh and 
Mr. Osgood Hooker Jr. Miss Mary Julia 
Crocker and Mr. Harry Crocker have also 
joined the party, and after a few weeks' stay 
in London they will go to the continent. 



"Ah, good! Your stomach is much bet- 
ter?" 

"Yes, doctor, but the trouble now is that 
my heart stopped beating after receiving 
your bill." — Le Rire (Paris). 







at last-ihe Rrfect Battery 



SERVICE 

for all makes of 

STORAGE 
BATTERIES 

Brinizyourbattery 
problems here. 



You put it in your car and FORGET IT. 
It requires no water — no attention. Costs no 
more than any good liquid type battery and 
lasts longer. Plates cannot buckle — over- 
charging can't hurt it — the "JE" Battery 
can be left entirely discharged for long periods 
without deterioration. Puts more pep and 
power into your starting system. Eliminates 
all ordinary battery troubles. 
The "J-E" Battery is unconditionally guar- 
anteed for 18 months. Put one in your car 
TODAY— Then Forget It. 



Storage Battery Dealer 

Telephone CITY Address 

^se* _ T— C Battery 

Requires no Water 




Gentlewomen — 

Jl trade that is of 

great importance: 

THE CARE OF THE HAIR 
THE CARE OF THE FACE 
THE CARE OF THE NAILS 

Hairdressing 
tT&arceling 

Cosgroves Hair Store 

Established 25 years 
360 Geary Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone: KEARNY 3^42 
{Berkeley Store: 2331 Telegraph Ave. 



VI N Q B A R! 

The Brick with the Kick 

Make Your Own It Is Simple 
Guaranteed not to make Vinegar 

VINOBAR MFG. CO., San Francisco 

636-38 WASHINGTON STREET 
Agents Wanted 




FIREPROOF 

STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 

WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1636 Market St 

Bet. Franklin and Gough 

Tel. Park 271 San Francisco 



BERGEZFRANKS 

Old Poodle Dog 

Luncheon 75c 

Served Daily— 1 1 to 2 

Choose full-sized portions from large menu. 

which i» changed every day. 

Excellent Food— Beautiful Environment 

Prompt Service 

French Dinner $1.50 

Inducting Ux. week da ri And SuadavB, 5 to 9 P. M. 

DANCING 

421 BLSH ST . ABOYF KEARNY 
PVmk iWu 2411 



18 




-Agitated Stranger : 
Do you wish a 



FOSTER A BOWERY GENIUS 

After the Kentucky newspapers have been 
writing up the "splendid record" of Stephen 
C. Foster, in connection with his famous 
songs of Southern life, and the proposition 
to buy "the old Kentucky home where he 
was born," it is stated that he never saw 
Kentucky. 

According to Harold Vincent Milligan. who 
has lectured on the subject in New York, 
three of the more famous songs by Foster 
were written when he was a resident of the 
Bowery and "more or less down and out." 
Foster is best remembered as a song writer 
by his "Old Kentucky Home," "Way Down 
Uoon the Suwanee River," and "Old Black 
Joe." 

Foster never saw the Suwanee River (it 
was originally the Peedee and later the 
Yrzoo River in the original version of his 
song). Trie fact that there is a house in 
Bardstown. Ky., which is marked with a 
tablet as the exact spot where he wrote his 
famous "Weep no more, my lady," refrain, 
only proves how unreliable is history — espe- 
cially what may be called guide-book history. 

Something caused the song writer to leave 
his wife and family in Pittsburg and take 
up his life arcund the Bowery. In his inter- 
esting lecture Milligan says: 

"The cause of Foster's domestic trouble 
and the date of his arrival on the Bowery 
are not known. But we know he took to 
drink and was more or less of a dereli< '• for 
severrl years. Whether he wrote his best 
sonss under the influence of liquor or after 
he had sobered up we don't know, but we 
do know that his songs are the most widely 
known American songs that have ever been 
written. There are many people who regard 
'Way Down Upon the Suwanee Ri\er' as the 
greatest of all native compositions. 

"Dream of Jennie With the Lieht Brown 
Hair" Fos'.er wrote in Pittsburgh when a 
young man. 

"K?ty Bell" he wrote after he had become 
a resident of the Bowery. Foster's famous 
songs were all written in that part of the 
nineteenth century when the nigger-minstrel 
stage was at its glory and popular songs of 
the Southern flavor were in demand. 

Another account of Foster's career states 
that he once visited Kentucky, but did not 
write any of his Southern songs there. His 
domestic trouble was due to his being a 
dreamer and his wife a practical woman. He 
undoubtedly became a victim of dnnk and he 
spent his last few davs forlorn and unknown 
in Bellevue Hospital, New York. 



Strcne on Appetite — "Why did vou dis- 
charge that splendid cook you had?" 

"It was the only way to get our guests to 
go home." — Boston Transcript. 



COSTUMES OF RAGS 

Cleveland Bonner, originator of spectac- 
ular ballets, is called in New York "the king 
of shreds and patches" on account of his 
talent for making stage costumes out of col- 
ored rags. Talking with a New York Herald 
reporter he said: 

"I suppose you are wondering what I can 
do with rags, and what relation they bear to 
the creation of costumes. With me they are 
e\erything. A background of dull cloth, 
then some brightly colored rags scattered 
over it, and over them a thin net — and what 
do you see? A gown or a robe so gorgeous 
that when it is seen from the audience you'd 
take your oath it cost thousands. Yet it costs 
almost nothing. That's the secret of my de- 
s'gning." 

SUNBEAMS 

Aunt Susan's Dilemma — Aunt Susan, an 
old Maryland darky, was being registered for 
the fiist time. Like many other women who 
were torn between their desire to vote and 
retain their youth. Aunt Susan neither rel- 
ished telling her age nor discussing other pri- 
vate matters. 

"Vvhat are your affiliations?" asked the 
registrar. 

'Why. boss, I don' hav' to tell dem, do 
I?" queried Aunt Susan in dismay. 

"Answer the question," commanded the 
hard-hearted registrar. 

"But, boss," protested Aunt Susan, "I don' 
like to. He's got a wife and five children." 
— hhiladelphia Public Ledger. 



A Lady Greaser — Mrs. Hiram Offun : We 
must treat our new cook with respect. She 
belongs to the Revolutionary Dames where 
she came from. 

"Where'd she come from?" 

"Mexico." — Rochester Democrat and 
Chronicle. 



A Costly Business — Seth says he has quit 
the law. He and Lige Smith went to law 
for a shoat. He won the pig which soon died 
of cholera, and he and Lige each had to sell 
a horse to pay their lawyers. — DeWitt New 
Era. 



Not for Him — "Here, boy," said the man 
to the boy who was helping him drive a 
bunch of cattle, "hold this bull a minute, will 



you 



V 



' No." answered the boy, "I don't mind 
bein' a director in this company, but I'm 
darned if I want to be a stockholder. — Car- 
loons. 



Getting Off Easy- 
Here, take this dollar. 

Head Waiter: Yes, 
table? 

Agitated Stranger: Heavens no. But 
when I parade up here with three girls you 
juts say there isn't a table left and there 
won't be one before about next Wednesday 
noon. — Life. 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

Gus' Fashion 

The MOST POPULAR RESTAURANT 

65 Post Street, Near Market Street. 
Phone Kearny 4536 San Francisco, Calif. 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 
French and Italian Dinners. 

FISH AND CAME A SPECIALTY 



For lhat stubborn cough 
Use Old Snake Doclor's Cough Remedy 

SNAKE DRUG CO. 

Formerly G. Leipnitz & Co. 

Now Located at 

127-129 KEARNY ST. 



FACIAL DEFECTS 
Crooked Noses, Lines of Age, Etc. 

(Facial Reconstruction) 

H. EARLE COGER, A. M. 

797 Bush St. Office Hours 1 to 4 

San Francisco Phone Sutter 3617 



San Francisco Law School 

Third Floor Call Btltldlllg 

Evening Sessions for Men & Women, 7:30 to 9:30 

Applications ror enrollmenl &r* being received now 

Classes convene Monday, September 12, 11)21 

Write Today For ('Dialogue 



PENINSULAR PATRONAGE 60LIC I T E D 



POST-TAYLOR GARAGE, Inc. 

530 TAYLOR ST. 

Washing and Greasing Cars 
in a careful and efficient manner 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

INSURANCE BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

Phone Kearny 391 San Franckco 



"The House of Quality" 
GOLDEN GATE DAIRY LUNCH 

Block & McDonald, Props. 

Service Supreme Home Cooking 

Prices Reasonable 

172 EDDY STREET 

Visit them after the shoiv and meal times 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



Bank of New South Wales 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of Pro- 
prietors .- 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Aggregate Assets, 30th 
Sept. 1920 




$24,655,500.00 
16,750,000.00 

24,655,500.00 



$362,338,975.00 



SIR JOHN RUSSELL FRENCH, K. B. E., General Manager 

357 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian States, New Zealand, Fiji, Papua (New 
Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of Australasian Banking 
Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged. 

Head Office: London Office: 

GEORGE STREET. SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET. E. C. 2 

Agents : 
Bank of California, National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bank, Crocker Nat'I Bank 






The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Member of the Federal Reserve System 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement and 7th Avenue 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

DECEMBER 31. 1920 

Assets $69,878,147.01 Capital Actually Paid Up _...$!. 000,000.00 

Deposits 66,338.147.01 Reserve and Contingent Funds „ 2,540,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund. $343 ,536.? 5 

OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK, President 

GEO. TOURNY, Vice-Pres. and Manager A. H. R. SCHMIDT. Vice-Pres. and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSE, Vice-President A. H. MULLER. Secretary 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary 

WILLIAM HERRMANN, Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL. Assistant Cashier 

G A. BELCHER, Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN. Assistant Cashier 

C. W. HEYER. Manager Mission Branch W. C. HEYER. Manager Park-Presidio Dist. Branch 

O. F. PAULSEN. Manager Haight Street Branch 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

JOHN A. BUCK E. T. KRUSE I. N. WALTER A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY A. H. R. SCHMIDT HUGH GOODFELLOW E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. A. CHRISTENSON ROBERT DOLLAR L. S. SHERMAN 

GOODFELLOW. EELLS. MOORE & ORRICK. General Attorneys 



BOND DEPARTMENT 

THZ ANGLO AND LONDON PARIS 

NATIONAL BANK 



Su ter and Sansome Streets 

Phone Ke.my 5600 

San Francisco, Cal. I. 



RECOMME.XDS 

IRRIGATION DISTRICT BONDS 

FOR IWESTMENT 

THEY ARE more secure than first mortgages because they rank ahead of 
first morgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT. 

Yield from 6 to 6^1 
Let us send you our booklet THE IRRIGATION DISTRICT BOND 



THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE 

HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO. CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 

STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptlv and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and at LONDON. ENC; NEW YORK: 

PORTLAND. ORE.: SEATTLE. WASH.: MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE. 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE. Manager W. J. COULTHARD. Assistant Manager 




N. W. CORNER 

POtK and POST STS. 



Normandie Garage 

Gough and Sutter Sts. 



Washing and Polishing Day and Night. 

Cars Oiled and Greased. 

Crank Cases Drained Free. 

Home Garage Trade Solicited. 



Fillmore 4815 



Old Hampshire Bond 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

The Standard Paper for Business Stationery. 
"Made a little better than seems necessary." The 
typewriter paper* are sold in attractive and durable 
boxes containing five hundred perfect sheets, plain 
or marginal ruled. The manuscript covers are sold 
in similar boxes containing one hundred sheets. 
Order through you, printer or stationer, or, if so de- 
sired we will send a sample book showing the tntire 
line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 

37-45 FIRST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



BLANCO'S 

Farrell and Larkin Sti. 
Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without 

dining in the finest cafe in America 
Lnncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner $1.75 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 

PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Office*— 505-507— 323 Geary Street 



m 




The Roamer Due- 
ienberg Motor 
holds the follow- 
ing World's Rec- 
ord: — 

One Mile— 

34.2Ssec. 

Two Miles — 

lm. 08.86sec. 

Three Miles— 
lm. 43.69sec. 

Four Miles — 
2m. 18.08sec. 

Five Miles — 
2m. 53.48sec. 

Kilometer — 

21.56sec. 





ROA 

y4 m e ric a s S m artesi Car 

Fastest Mile Ever Traveled 
in Stock Chassis 

At Daytona, Florida, a Roamer with Duesenberg motor triumphed over 
all motordom and established new world's records. 

Fastest Two Miles! Fastest Four! 

Fastest Three! Fastest Five! 

And Fastest Kilometer! 

By a Non-Professional Racing Driver! 

BARLEY MOTOR CAR COMPANY, Kalamazoo, Michigan 

ROAMER MOTOR CAR COMPANY 

1801 VAN NESS AVE., SAN FRANCISCO Phone Prospect 2005 





Established July 20 1856 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



SATURDAY, JULY 30, 1921 



AND 

(California Aotiprlterr 

$5.00 PER YEAR 



Discussed in this Issue 

Mark Twain and the Christian Scientists 

Disgraceful Scene at Supervisors' Meeting 

Triumph of the Open Shop 

Our State Disgraced at Turlock 

A Delicate Subject Gingerly Treated 

America's Rabelais Discovered in S.F. 

New Angles of Anglo- Japanese Alliance 

Improper Reduction of Assessments 

Financial Developments of the Week 

Absurdity of a General Strike 

Gossip of Society and Theatrical News of Interest 



Sold at all news stands 



10 cents 




RESPONSIBILITY 

From the quarry where the 
rough granite is hewn, 
through the processes of 
drilling, cutting, sawing, 
carving, and polishing, to 
the final assembly and fab- 
rication into the Memorial, 
one organization demon- 
strates by consistent success 
the value of this single re- 
sponsibility for design, man- 
ufacture, and installation. 

One standard, therefore, 
governs the design and man- 
ufacture of the materials as 
well as the engineering and 
construction service. 

Booklet "DN" on Memo- 
rials, sent on request. 



Raymond Granite Company, Inc. 

CONTRACTORS 

GRANITE— STONE— BUILDING— MEMORIAL 

3 Potrero Avenue, San Francisco. 1350 Palmelto Street, Los Angeles. 




J. B. CROWE 



3652 GEARY, at 1st Ave. 1055 Post St., at Polk 

PHONE FRANKLIN 7445 

GLAZING 
BEVELING 



™n° g b,le Glass of All Kinds 



^8*Sx s *S><SkSx8kS>3k8kSx8hSX!>8x ! *8kSxS>3k^^ 



^>an iffranrigfn (Ertromrlg 



Leading Newspaper of the Pacific Coast 



A Newspaper made every day 

TO SPEAK TO 

Every member of every family 

Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for $1.15 a 

month —including Sunday editions. 

Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or post matter. 



Juio 
Camp 
Comfort 
Outfit 




When purchasing: your camping: outfit there are four essential points to consider: First, 
(iniFOUT; second. CAPACITY; third. COMPACTNESS; fourth. COST per person accommo- 
dated. Tin.- Auto Comfort outfit is more than a bed at nisrht. !t is a roomy camp home. 
RAIN or SHINE. Our Combination Cot makes a bed at night, Tabic Settee, Morris chair 
und Rending lieil for day use. Our outfits accommodate from one to six people. Our mm- 
sagging beds only weigh twenty-seven pounds. S.nd for literature and prices and we will 
fill your order direct if your dealer does not carry our goods. Yours for comfort while 
camping, 

THREE LEAF COT MFG. COMPANY, 

Sunnyvale, fallforniji. 



Manufacturers of Auto Camp Outfits. Folding Tents, Beds, Chairs and Mattri 
Dealers send for prices. 



PYR0-V0ID 

Dr. Hoagland's Home Treatment 
- for - 

PYORRHEA 

Package with full directions sent 
in plain wrapper for One Dollar 

Satisfaction Guaranteed or Money Refunded 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

Dental Specialist 

908 Market Street, at Powell 

San Francisco 

Dept. N. L. Established 1903 

SAVE YOUR TEETH 



USE 

Associated Products 

"More Miles to the Gallon" 



% 

Associated Oil Company 



Sharon Bldg. 



San Francisco 



We Stand for the Best in Business Training 




Private Secretaries 

600 SUTTER ST. FRANKLIN 306 



An Ounce of Prevention is 
Worth Many Pounds of 
Ten - mile - from - no- 
where- regret. 

Let our expert automobile electricians 
inspect your starting, lighting and 
ignition systems regularly. It's the best 
insurance against a breakdown at an 
important moment. 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 

PIASTER AUTOMOBILE SLECTRIC1ANS 
955 Post Street SAN FRANCISCO 



Solid fur CHtliln 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856. 




SAN £g§S?«*So 




111 



Devoted to the Leading Interesls of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. XCIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JULY 30, 1921 



No. 31 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA 
ADVERTISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. 
Frederick Marriott, 259 Minna Street, near Fourth, San Francisco, Cal. Tele- 
phone Kearny 720. Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post Office as second 
class mail matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year, $5.00. Foreign: One 
year $6.00; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not he 
responsible for the return of anlj unsolicited manuscripts. 



"Grandmotherey legislation," is what visiting English business 

men call our dry spasm and blue-law agitation crusade. 

Will we never more see the good, honest old ten-cent loaf of 

bread on the family table? 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

Why doesn't it ever occur to the busy reformers to demand a 

reduction in our fire insurance rates? 

9 V ¥ 

What an awful shock it will be to the business agents to go 

back to hard work when the Open Shop goes into full effect! 

When will we start on the plans for a new Charter in San 

Francisco to clean out the City Hall and lower taxes? 
¥ ¥ ¥ 

It is announced that the film industry is gravitating to San Fran- 
cisco. We won't care if it is gravitating to Hades unless the quality 
of the sex pictures improves. 

Now that the Open-Shop American Plan is sweeping the con- 
tinent the unions may let up on their opposition to members joining 

the National Guards. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

What will the City Hall push do for a slogan instead of "Helch 

Hctchy and Pure Mountain Water." if the Pacific Gas and Electric 
buys up the outfit as an auxiliary electric plant? 

Representative Johnson of Kentucky wanted to shoot a commit- 
tee witness who called him "a liar." How angry those lawmakers 
get when people copy their blackguardism. 

Two women motorists in Colorado were overtaken by a water- 
spout and swept over a cliff. It would be a slow motorist in Cali- 
fornia that a waterspout could overhaul. 

» » • 

Andy Gallagher will referee the tug-of-war at the Sinn Fein 

picnic. The report that he intended to do some of the hard pulling 

was maliciously false. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

The actual figures of the rival paraders in New ^ork. it seems. 

were 15.000 in line for canning Volstead and 8.000 in line with old 
Bill Bryan camouflaged as a Christian Endeavorer. 
* * * 

Wi'l Russia go back to the Vodka as soon as Lenine checks in. 

which promises to be soon? Russia, the United States, Turkey — 
all three bone dry. Can't we find better company? 



Why cite the holdups in Golden Gate Park as proofs of wide- 
spread robbery? What about the open robberies of customers in 
the shoe stores, hat stores, tailor shops and all the other profiteers' 
dens? 

Pussey-foot Johnson promised to have Johnny Bull on the 

water wagon in a year. But Johnny has just added an hour to the 
legal day for loading up and increased the strength of whiskey to 
the pre-war percentage. 

Driver of a truckload of grain alcohol, en route from Agnews 

to San Francisco, chloroformed at Mountain View, and can't tell 
how the twelve barrels vanished. What Volstead enforced is sus- 
pected ? 

* * * 

Instead of wasting columns on domestic tangles, why don't the 

newspapers just say, "An ordinary triangle problem for Judge Gra- 
ham?" Great savings of print paper and a boon to the weary read- 
ers. It's always the same old story. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

The Citizens' Training Camp at the Presidio has been as suc- 
cessful as might be expected in a period when the nation is afflicted 
by Bolshevists and revolutionary labor unions. Next year the camp 
will be a lot bigger. 



Golf is a fine exercise for fat business men, but rifle clubs to 

teach our young men to handle rifles would be a far better public 
investment. Don't get crazy on the illusion that we will never need 
riflemen again. 



Supervisor McSheehy has got in wrong again by getting the 

assessment on the old St. Nicholas Hotel property reduced, when it 
should have been raised, if anything. Mac looked like Mayoralty 
timber once, but he is earning the title of "the political squab." 



-Does that dismissal of a bigamy charge against a former 



soldier, by Police Judge O'Brien, indicate that we will soon need 
another recall election? Why don't we adopt a new charter, making 
police judges appointive and thus lift the ermine out of the political 
mire? 

* * * 

Presbyterian conference in New York protests against the "in- 
fidel and revolutionary philosophy of American colleges." That's 
the way the Inquisition spoke of the Scientists who dared to say 
the world was not flat, nor the moon and stars stuck in the sky to 
save candlelight. 



The Mayor of Canton. China, is studying our San Francisco 

municipal methods with a view to imitation. Here is a chance to 
swap off our City Hall bunch for a gang of Canton statesmen that 
will sweep the sidewalks and clean the windows as well as talk 
politics. 



San Francisco News Letter and 



DIToBIAL, 




Although the Supervisors are trying to 
Meddlesome Supervisors raise funds in many ways to meet city ex- 
penses, they are reducing Assessor Ginty's 
assessments on upper Market Street property, which the owners will 
not improve or sell. Upper Market Street is one of the things of 
which San Francisco should be ashamed. There is no finer main 
street in any city than Market Street. Even with the four-track 
impediment the Rolph administration has placed upon the street, 
the thoroughfare offers great business advantages. 

But upprogressive property owners have retarded the improve- 
ment of upper Market Street. Either they lack the money or the 
enterprise to erect anything but poster fences. The primitive sand- 
lots remain bare. 

It should be the public policy of cities to encourage necessary 
building. Where owners allow their property on important streets 
to remain idle, so that they may gain an unearned increment by 
the enterprise of their neighbors who build, the unenterprising ones 
should be taxed to the limit. They should not be encouraged to 
follow a dog-in-the-manger policy by declining to sell and holding 
back till they get their fancy price. 

That is what some of the property owners on upper Market Street 
are said to be doing. They have been offered fair prices, it is said, 
but they refuse to accept, and the progress of our city is injuriously 
affected. In some instances the vacant lots and blocks are estates, 
controlled by executors. Such officials may have a selfish personal 
interest in delaying sales so that their salaries or fees would be con- 
tinued. Where there happens to be a conflict of heirs, a crafty 
executor may manage affairs that his position becomes a life job. 

A mere handfull of people own the unimproved blocks on upper 
Market Street that are such a detriment to civic improvement. Tax- 
ation is the only thing that will stimulate such persons to build. • 

Assessor John Ginty understands well the state of affairs which has 
retarded the irmrovement of Market Street. He is a notably fair 
assessor, and whatever assessment value he has placed on the unim- 
proved lots and blocks is certain to be the proper figure. The Super- 
visors, however, have undertaken to reduce the official assessments, 
thus helping to delay the sale of the unimproved lot and blocks to 
owners with ready money and the requisite stock of enterprise. 

That there is a demand for good buildings in the neighborhood so 
lamentably backward is shown bv the class of desirable tenants who 
are leasing any structures capable of being used as motor vehicle 
salesrooms. A substantial new building at the corner of Market and 
Eleventh was snapped up at once by one of the leading men in the 
automobile and tractor business. 

This neglect to improve fine property on our main street is im- 
portant as we have here a large proportion of single taxers who point 
out such cases as proof of their dangerous theories. The present 
system of electing our Supervisors at large is largely responsible 
for unimproved districts being left a menace to civic progress. 
Supervisors at present profess to represent the entire city, but, in 
fact, they represent nothing but their own general incapacity. In 
the new charter, which the public is meditating. Supervisors should 
be elected from their wards. Then taxpayers in the wards would 
know just where to place the blame for the neglect which is now 

the strongest characteristic of our municipal service. 
¥ * * 

The letter of G. W. Luce, Freight Traffic 
No Redaction of Rates Manager of the Southern Pacific Number 

on the subject of a reduction in freight 
rates, seems to be regarded by the press as a finality. Mr. Luce's 
letter was in replv to an inquiry from Charles P. Bayer, president 
of the California Association of Commercial Secretaries. 

"There can be no general reduction in freight rates at this time 



because with all the savings that the railroads can possible make, 
as a result of wage reductions and other economies, they can hope 
to earn only with the greatest difficulty the amount necessary to 
meet their fixed charges for 1921." Such is Mr. Luce's statement, 
and he supports it by an array of facts and figures that carry con- 
viction. 

"Under government control the railroads were not permitted, as 
were other business enterprises, to make large profits and roll up big 
surplusses on which they might draw during periods of depression. 
They were restricted to the same net returns they earned during the 
three years before the United Slates entered the war. Their prop- 
erties were allowed to deteriorat. The number of freight cars avail- 
able actually decreased 126,000 under government control. The 
recent business depression has hit the railroads as hard as any other 
class of business. 1 hey must be permitted to put their properties 
in good condition and get upon their feet financially if they are to 
meet fully the traffic requirements when general business improves. 
They cannot do this if general reductions in rates are made at this 
time. 

"If the railroads, by granting reductions, absorbed the loss in 
profits that confront various interests today, the carriers would be 
overwhelmed. The railroads must first cure their own weakened con- 
dition and establish themselves firmly before they can extend help 
to those industries that are suffering from the general depression. 
They cannot jeopardize the country's transportation system in order 
to meet a temporary business emergency." 

Referring to the recent wage cut of 12 per cent, ordered by the 
United States Railroad Labor Board, Mr. Luce shows very clearly 
that it could not justify a reduction of freight rates. The wage cut 
is less than 50 per cent of the last wage advance, effective May I, 
1920. It is only 18 per cent of the $2,230,000,000 increase in 
wages made during the war period. 

Mr. Luce has shown by figures of traffic that present rates are 
not preventing movement of any commodity for which there is an 
actual market. Ocean freight rates, though now almost at their 
lowest point in their history, have not stimulated business or traffic. 
Present business stagnation is due to worldwide economic conditions, 
and would have come had there been no increase in freight rates. 
Mr. Luce is positive on that point. 

He takes occasion to mention that the war tax on freight and 
passenger traffic is a phase of the rate question which is worthy of 
consideration. On the basis of 1920 traffic it is estimated that the 
railroads will remit to the federal government an annual tax of 
$268,000,000. This is not part of the rates and the railroads collect 
it for the government. 

The state taxes are also referred to by Mr. Luce in furnishing 
proofs of the load under which his road is staggering. The South- 
ern Pacific Company alone would pay to the state of California 
this year $6,125,700.28 under the old rate of 5J4 per cent on 
gross receipts, but it is now called upon to pay $8,167,600.37 under 
the new rate provided in the King tax bill. 

That increase is. of course, figured into the freight bills that the 
shippers have to pay. 

Mr. Luce certainly makes out a strong argument against any 
reduction of rates under existing conditions. 

That was an edifying and dignified pro- 
An Orator's Expulsion ceeding at the Board of Supervisors on Mon- 
day when old Tom Zant was officially ex- 
pelled for having uttered, aforetime, criticisms disrespectful of the 
Finance Committee. Citizen Zant belongs to the type of patriots 
who formerly vociferated on the "sandlot" against the Chinese and 
the "Bloated Bondholders." We should not call his a "Sandlotter," 
for we have no knowledge that he ever devoted his oratorical tal- 
ents to the gatherings at the historic forum of the disgruntled. Per- 
haps he had not attained the full measure of his disputative powers 
when Kerneyism was in flower. 

It is a mental impossibility for Citizen Zant to hide his light under 
a bushel, and whenever in open session the affairs of state are under 
consideration his rotundity is likely to command attention. As 
applied politics appears to be his trade, he manages to maintain an 
uncertain connection with the municipal payroll. His utterances 
have, therefore, a semi-official flavor, not always gratifying to our 
municipal rulers. "No man is a hero to his valet," and few Super- 



California Advertiser for July 30, 1921 

visors, except those who have jobs to give away, are in Citizen Zant's 
eyes, the noble patriots they describe themselves before election. 

At present Mr. Zant's attitude toward the Finance Committee 
seems to coincide with that of the taxpayers, so restive under the 
increase of the municipal expenses from $6,000,000 in 1906 to $25,- 
000,000 in in 1921, without corresponding increase of population. 
Not having the stenographic report of Citizen Zant's remarks on the 
Finance Committee, we are unable to judge whether the animadver- 
sions demanded ari apology or the perpetual banishment of the 
orator from the City Hall. Most citizens would have hailed the de- 
cree of expulsion as a flattering compliment, and placed the greatest 
possible distance between themselves and the Supervisors' chambers. 
Not so Citizen Zant, whose patriotism glows the more brightly the 
harder that foes of the common weal try to snuff him out. 

He turned up at the Supervisors' meeting on Monday and Ser- 
geant-at-Arms Tiv Krelling — a lightweight wrestler in his day — was 
instructed to cast out the presumptious intiuder. Having by official 
orders thrown out one Julius Caesar Saulmann, a charter expert, 
some year ago, with fatal consequences, it is said, the Sergeant-at- 
Arms handled the elderly and overweight Zant with prudence. But 
the tabooed orator clung to the railing and shrieked to the populace 
(mostly job chasers). The scene was as dignified as a poundmas- 
ter's descent on the unlicensed family pet, and the hysterical screams 
of his female owner to arcuse neighborly aid and baffle the myrmi- 
dons of the law. 

Our sagacious Chief Magistrate naturally injected himself into the 
fracas by calling to the struggling orator from the lofty seat of 
authority that an apology was all that could stop the expulsion. 
Citizen Zant's spirit of voluntary martyrdom came to his aid. He 
refused to crawfish, and the Sergeant-at-Arms, injecting a little more 
vim into his formidable biceps, the blacklisted spellbinder was torn 
from the railing and projected into the outer loneliness. 

What a noble fresco for the Board of Supervisors' chamber that 
spirited scene would make? It is only matched by the recent Con- 
gressional scenes, where a Kentucky Representative wanted to shoot 
an offending committee witness, or where a dozen Senators had hard 
work to keep two august wearers of the toga from getting tangled up. 



The leaders of the British coal miners are trying 
Imaginary Gains to explain what the men gained by striking for 
thirteen weeks and then going back to work, 
minus their wages for the time they were idle. 

Mr. Hodge, the college-bred miner who never mines, but hoists 
his heels on a desk in his fine offices in London when not making 
street-corner speeches, explains that the men have won a great 
principle. 

To on outsider it looks as if the miners have won nothing more 
than they could have had at the beginning of their ruinous strike. 
They wanted the principle of "the pool" established and they lost. 

Lerdcr Hodge declares that they have won "the principle of profit- 
sharing," but the Manchester Guardian, a notably fair and inde- 
pendent English newspaper, says that "there is no improvement." 

Says the Guardian: "The principle of profit-sharing had been 
agreed upon in March, before the stoppage, and the actual propor- 
tions in which it is now agreed that earnings should be divided be- 
tween wages and profits are almost exactly what the owners were at 



that lime claiming. 



Profit-sharing schemes have some- 



times failed because the men. however willing to share in profits, 
are unable to share losses. This difficulty the owners intend to 
overcome by temporarily meeting losses themselves out of their 
standard profits and recouping themselves later when the industry 
can afford it. A difficulty which may arise later is that men who 
share in the profits are apt to demand some sort of control over 
the management, whose efficiency largely determines how big the 
profits are to be. This will be met to some extent by the joint in- 
spection of books. That is an important concession which should, 
at any rate, keep the peace for a while. The profit-sharing part of 
ihe scheme will not come into full force until the end of September 
When the miners' loss of wages for thirteen weeks is placed beside 



the financial gain of the profit-sharing scheme it will be found that 
the men are heavy losers. But Leader Hodge and the others who 
do the talking and dodge hard labor continue to get their fat salaries. 

In a letter to the Belgian Minister of Industry 
Altrustic Delusions and Labor, King Albert explains his reasons 
for having signed the new law committing his 
kingdom to the eight-hour day. The Belgian Parliament adopted the 
law after long deliberation, and it is evident from King Albert's let- 
ter that he was in no hurry to put his signature to the bill. What 
kings do these days, in approving economic laws, cuts little figure 
with thinking people. There are not many European kings left, 
and the few are more intent on pleasing their subjects than trying 
to knock sense into their heads. 

Nobody questions that eight hours a day is long enough for any 
kind of worker. But there is no divine law which prevents them 
from having to work eighteen hours. In fact. Providence seems to 
pay no attention at all to the matter. People work long or short 
hours, according to their needs. Industrial nations, in competition 
with others that work long hours, must keep long hours themselves 
or abandon the competition and go hungry. Everything in this 
civilization of ours is relative. 

Belgium is an industrious country, which cannot support one-half 
its population of five millions by its natural resources. It is driven 
to competition in the markets of the world, and if its competitors 
work ten or twelve hours a day it will find it hard to sell its goods 
in the world markets. In his letter to the Minister of Industry and 
Labor. King Albert sagely remarks: "Reform in domestic law does 
not reform competition in foreign markets." 

Just now, if reports be correct, German mechanics are working 
ten and twelve hours a day. The enormous indemnity Germany has 
to pay the Allies must be liquidated in goods. The German mark 
has sunk so low in the world's exchange that a German mechanic 
paid in German paper marks receives about 60 cents a day, meas- 
ured in American money. In addition to his low pay, the German 
worker toils ten and twelve hours, and no one should lose sight 
of the fact that the German mechanic is a very efficient worker. How 
is Belgium, with its eight-hour day, to meet the competition of Ger- 
many with its ten or twelve-hour day? 

Before the war reputable English newspapers, like the London 
Telegraph, were full of complaints about the impossibility of British 
manufacturers' meeting German competition in their own market. 
Germany was then prosperous and did not work as hard as now. If 
England could not compete with Germany before the war, how 
is she to meet the fierce German competition of today in goods 
produced by German mechanics paid 60 cents a day and working 
ten hours, at least? 

He would be a wise prophet who could forecast the full effect 
of this German competition in the world's markets. At present, the 
flow of orders is toward Germany, and her factories are working 
overtime. What chance has an American manufacturer, paying a 
dollar an hour, or half that, to underbid a German firm paying its 
mechanics 60 cents a day? It is like bringing industrial America, 
or England, into competition with an Asia, highly skilled and effi- 
cient to the last degree. Such is the economic condition which war 
has brought upon the workers of the world. 

We may see very soon a general abandonment of the altruistic 
theory that workmen must be paid wages that will guarantee their 
living on a plane worthy of white citizens. Already in England 
there is a repudiation of various benevolent projects to raise the 
British workers to new social levels. The hopes on which the Brit- 
ish workers were fed are giving way to the old and gloomy belief 
that life for the toiler means endless hard work and finishes in the 
poor house. The great economic laws of supply and demand even- 
tually overcomes all the popular enactments of politicians to make 
everybody a gentleman with soft, white hands, working a few hours 
a day and spending the remainder of his time at golf or tennis. 

What the white world needs more than anything is a campaign of 
commonsense which will give it a saner outlook on life, based on 
the old-fashioned principles of honesty, industry and economy. 



San Francisco News Letter and 



Mark Twain and Christian Science 

By HARVEY BROUGHAM 



THE Christian Science Community appears to be in conscien- 
tious distress, judging by the full-page ads appearing in large 
Eastern newspaper, and paid for by the handlers of the church 
funds. 

All the trouble has arisen from the announcements in New York 
newspapers that on Saturday, July 16, the hundredth birthday of 
Mary Baker Eddy, founder of the Christian Scientist Church, would 
be celebrated at her birthplace. Bow, near Concord, New Hamp- 
shire. Christian Scientists from many parts of the country, the 
newspapers said, "would make pilgrimages to her grave and observ- 
ances would be held in Christian Science Churches." 

To non-believers this would not appear to be calculated to create 
any stir beyond the usual interest in the commemoration of a dear 
religious leader's birthday celebration. But as the essence of the 
Christian Science faith is denial of material reality, the commemora- 
tion of Mrs. Eddy's birthday would be a gross inconsistency. Never 
having been born in the material carnal sense, there is nothing 
material on which her disciples could base a birthday celebration. 
There is a large hexigonal stone marking the spot of her birth, but 
that means nothing. The commemoration stone must be viewed 
from the spiritual standpoint — as a materia! illusion. To have pious 
disciples, gathered in thousands around that purely imaginary speci- 
men of the stone cutter's art, commemorating an event which never 
took place, could not but be an embarrassment to the orthodox sect. 
From many places letters were sent to Mrs. Augusta E. Stetson, 
successor to Mrs. Eddy (if, indeed, one who never was born car- 
nally could have a successor), demanding an explanation of the 
reported celebration and pilgrimage so contrary to the teachings. 
Mrs. Stetson has considered it advisable to use whole pages in large 
newspapers of New York and other cities to abate the conscientious 
tumult. These publications of Mrs. Stetson are printed as "religious 
notices" and paid for as pure advertising. They must have cost a 
good deal, but the Church is not suffering from emptiness of the 

exchequer. 

* * * 

In the introductory paragraph of her letter, Mrs. Stetson says 
that it is impossible to send an individual answer to all corre- 
spondents. 

All true Christian Scientists are "striving to attain the mind of 
Christ," declares Mrs. Stetson, and eventually they will do so, 
"through suffering out of the fleshly dream of life in matter, in 
obedience to the laws of Life and Love emerge from the material 
senses and begin to build on a wholly sniritual foundation." 

Man is not material. Death is an illusion. There is no matter. 
Such are the salient points made by Mrs. Stetson in Quoting from 
the writings of Mrs. Eddy, whose n?me she frequently associates 
with Christ. There being nothing but fallacy in the ideas of material 
life, it would be absurd to commemorate the physical birth of Mrs. 
Eddy, even though a monument marks the spot where it is said 
to have occurred. One has to be a clever metaphysician to follow 
the fine-soun thread of Mrs. Stetson's argument, which deals with 
the world, the flesh and the devil, mixing them all up and disen- 
tangling them in a labyrinth of mysticism too dim for the mental 
vision of a carnal brain. 

The one thing made clear to the gross minds of outsiders is that 
Mrs. Stetson and her directors of the First Christian Church are 
firmlv onposed to the celebration of Mrs. Eddy's carnal birthdays, 
which Mark Twain nredicted would become a great religious demon- 
stration in 1920. His famous book on Christian Science was pub- 
lished bv Harper Brothers. New York, in 1907. His reasons for 
oredir.ting that Christian Science pilgrimages to M's Eddy's tomb 
would become imoressive was "that in America in 1920 there would 
be 10 000 000 Christian Scientists, and in Great Britain. 3 000.000. 
In 1940 they would be the governing power in the Republic. He 
believed it would "become a stronger master than the strongest of 



bygone times, because it would have a financial strength not dreamed 
of by any predecessor." 

Twain wrote on he subject with much earnestness, comparing 
Christian Science with Roman Catholicity. He said: 

"The Roman Church has a perfect organization, and it has an 
effective centralization of power — but not its cash — of the Christian 
Science organization. Its multitude of bishops are rich, but their 
riches remain in a large measure in their own hands. They collect 
from two hundred millions of Catholics, but they keep the bulk of 
the result at home. The Boston pope (Scientist) of by and by will 
draw his dollar-a-head capitation tax from three hundred millions 
of the human race by force and his Annex and the rest of his book- 
shop will fetch in as much more, and his Metaphysical Colleges, the 
annual pilgrimage to Mrs. Eddy's tomb from all over the world — 
admission, the Christian Science dollar (payable in advance) — pur- 
chases of consecrated glass beads, candles, memorial spoons, 
aureoled chromo-portraits and bogus autographs of Mrs. Eddy; cash 
offerings at her shrine — no crutches of cured cripples received, and 
no imitations of miraculously restored broken legs and necks allowed 
to be hung up, except when made out of the Holy Metal and proved 
by fire assay; cash for miracles work at the tomb; these money- 
sources, with a thousand to be yet invented and ambushed upon 
the devotee, will bring the annual increment above a billion. 

And nobody but the Trust (Christian Science) will have the han- 
dling of it. In that day the Trust will monopolize the manufacture 
and sale of Old and New Testament as well as the Annex, and 
raise their prices to Annex rates and compel the devotee to buy; for 
even today a healer has to have the Annex and the Scriptures, or he 
is not allowed to work the game, and that will bring several hun- 
dred million dollars more. In those days the Trust will have an 
income approaching five million dollars a day, and no expenses to be 
taken out of it; no taxes to pay and no charities to support. The 
last detail should not be lightly passed over by the reader — no 
charities to support! No, nor even to contribute to! 

* ¥ # 

"I have hunted, hunted and hunted, by correspondence and other- 
wise, and have not yet got upon the track of a farthing that the 
Trust has spent upon any worthy object. Nothing makes a Scientist 
so uncomfortable as to ask him if he knows of a case where Chris- 
tian Science has spent money on a benevolence, either amongst its 
own adherents or elsewhere. He is obliged to say, 'No.' " 

Mark Twain's prediction about the. pilgrimage to the tomb of Mrs. 
Eddy has not been verified in 1921. Unfortunately, the great writer 
has passed away, and we can have no opportunity to read what he 
might say about Mrs. Stetson's reasons for opposing the celebration 
of Mrs. Eddy's centennary. Were it held and encouraged by the 
Scientist hierarchy it might be a demonstration of astonishing size 
and fervency. Will it ever be held? Can the contradictions of 
materialism and spirituality be so reconciled that there will appear 
no absurdity in public adoration of an event which carnally is pos- 
sible, but spiritually is inadmissible? Metayhpsics can attempt many 
wonderful things, as, for example, that old problem of the hair- 
splitters, "How many angels can sit on the point of a needle?" 
Enough human brain energy has been expended on such problems 
to devise a scheme for the bankrupt nations of Europe to pay 
Uncle Sam. in gold coin, without a cent in the treasury, all the 
billions Woodrow Wilson lent them on Jaw-bone. 

* # * 

Could it be that Mark Twain's famous criticism of Christian 
Science, which had a great sale when published, had anything to 
do with the prompt and vigorous discouragement of the birthday 
commemoration? 

Unfortunately, the great American writer who found so little satis- 
faction^ in his elaborate study of Mrs. Eddy's Christian Science 
"bible," is no longer of this earth. We cannot have a psycho- 
analysis of the interdicted birthday celebration by him. How worth 
while it would be to serious readers! 

There is a lesson for writers in the failure of Mark Twain's pre- 
diction about the Eddy celebration and pilgrimage. Prophecy is 
a dangerous indulgence for authors. In dealing with the past or 
present, they are on safe ground, but when they try to lift a corner 
of the veil of futurity they usually prove themselves bungling necro- 
mancers. 



California Advertiser for July 30, 1921 



Open Shop Triumph 

By L. T. THOMPSON 



THE triumph of the Open Shop is a great gratification to the 
business people of San Francisco, who have so long seen 
their town suffering from industrial paralysis, by reason of the 
methods of the Closed Shop. 

In taking sides with the advocates of the Open Shop, the citizens 
of San Francisco have no other choice. They see what the Open 
Shop has done to boom Los Angeles and make it the most populous 
city in California. Not only that, but it is now reaching out to 
acquire the distinction of being the industrial centre of the Pacific 
Coast. It has ambitious and vast projects of hydro-electric develop- 
ment, and hopes by providing cheap power for manufacturers to 
make Los Angeles another Detroit, which in a small number of 
years has acquired a population of a million by the Open Shop. 

If San Francisco, faced by such competition, attempted to follow 
its old course, handicapped by the Closed Shop, its fate would be 
commercial and financial decay. Before long San Francisco would 
be wiped off the map. This fact our business men have at last 
realized. They look back and lament that they have so long re- 
mained in the shackles of the Labor Trust and let their city grow 
stagnant, while all the other large cities of the United States have 
made phenomenal progress in the past decade. 

Ihe adoption of the Open-Shop American Plan will transform in- 
dustrial and commercial San Francisco. At present independent 
workmen are discouraged from locating in our city. There is an 
organized system to keep them away. The men who do come are 
compelled to wear the yoke of the Labor Trust or remain idle. No 
honest contractor is confident in accepting a job that it will not break 
him. The Labor Trust system is designed to bankiupt employers 
of labor and has robbed many contractors. In fact, so notorious 
is that fact that it has become an accepted fact that the contracting 
business and bankruptcy are synonymous. 

Considering these facts, as all business men are now doing, it is 
not surprising that the Open-Shop American Plan is a convincing 
triumph. It will give new impetus to all industries, put floods of 
money in circulation that are now withheld by discouraged owners, 
and will start buildings to relieve the crisis from lack of new houses. 
In a few words, it will put every citizen on the road to good times. 

It is said the Japanese Government regards 
Our State Disgraced the Turlock affair as a mere local outbreak 
and will not dignify it by diplomatic negotia- 
tions. Nevertheless, it loses nothing of its discreditable character. 
It is always a stain on a government that it cannot protect the 
lives and liberty of strangers sojourning in its land. 

At Turlock no attempt was made to control the bunch of hoboes 
that had drifted in to profiteer at the expense of the farmers by 
organizing a corner on melon picking. There was only a handfull 
of vagabonds, and none of them appear to have been dangerous. 
They were just ordinary bums, looking for easy money, and the 
local authorities who allowed such specimens to take the law in their 
own hands and commit a crime which might involve the United 
States in negotiations with a formidable but friendly power are more 
deserving of jail than the Ku-Kluxets. 

There appears to have been no hostility to the Japanese melon 
pickers amongst the honest and industrious white help at Turlock. 
Ihe industrious white workers were looking for nothing but a chance 
to work at fair wages, but the bums were looking for nothing but 
a chance to get the largest wages for the least work, and make 
trouble on the least opportunity. 

The real sufferers were the farmers, who temporarily lost the as- 
sistance of the Japanese melon pickers. No great amount of sym- 
pathy can be wasted on these farmers, for if they elected a better 
class of officials in their county it would not have been disgraced. 
Wherever mob violence has broken out it has been found that the 



lawless demonstration was due more to the inefficiency or corruption 
of the local authorities than the strength of the disturbing anar- 
chists. 

Invariably after a demonstration of lynch law, there are loud 
protestations by the inefficient authorities that they were taken by 
surprise, and in no manner were favorable to the outrage of what- 
ever kind it happened to be. Are those protests to be taken at 
their face value? Is it not generally the truth that in lynchings and 
in race demonstrations of, as at Turlock, the local police and sheriff's 
deputies have kept out of sight and registered the usual alibi, expect- 
ing that in a few days it would all blow over and their popularity 
with the mob would be greater than ever? 

There is only one way to stop that sort of political bunko game, 
played by local officials — reorganize our courts of justice. Our state 
courts are now feeble and despised. Politics rule them. We should 
take all the judges out of politics. 

We have a good model before us in the County Court System of 
England, where about forty judges perform the judicial work for 
40,000,000. We have twice that number of judges in California, 
with two-and-a-half-million people. And yet we cannot give pro- 
tection to a few Japanese melon pickers at Turlock. We cannot 
give assurance to melon growers or any fruit growers in our state 
that they will not suffer from similar occurrences. Such a condi- 
tion is a disgrace to our government, and will be a greater disgrace 
unless we remedy it by abolishing election of judges. 

If we had appointed circuit judges in California the Turlock out- 
rage could be legally brought before the circuit court, and the local 
politicians, who are the real culprits, might find themselves in seri- 
ous danger of decorating the prison cells they have richly earned. 

Inherited Tendencies 

The head of the Melon Pickers' Union which ousted the Japanese 
from Turlock is Jimmie Shea, described as an ex-ballplayer — an 
noble occupation. Why is it that an Irishman goes to the head of 
some labor union as readily as a duck to water? Must be an in- 
herited trait. Originally there was nothing in Ireland but kings. 
When all the monarchs met on St. Patrick's Day at Donnybrook 
Fair — that was prior to Volstead — the rattle of the belligerent 
shillelaghs was like a blizzard in a blackthorn forest. 




seer 

roostin^-producef 
ihe wondrous flavor 

(Swell's 

^ -1 NA TIONAL CRIST 

(offee 



San Francisco News Letter and 




'<W attwitr^r (it drriljr. «tf >•« 



Ashamed of Our Ancestors 

PEOPLE who seem to think that motorists are entitled to special 
privileges at the cost of the taxpayers are writing to the news- 
papers suggesting that "comfort stations" be constructed along 
the highways. Why confine such conveniences to the highways, 
where motorists roll along in prosperous luxury? One of the sar- 
donic comments of visiting cosmopolitans in the United States is that 
it would be better to build "comfort places" for the suffering public 
than jails for bootleggers. Prohibition closed up 3000 saloons in 
San Francisco, but substituted nothing for them to serve the natural 
needs of their patrons. American moralists must assume that the 
human family has overcome all its physiological necessities by the 

adoption of the Volstead law. 

if ■ tfi sf 

The United States is by no means more civilized than Paris, 
where, on all the boulevards, there are numerous "comfort sta- 
tions." One is not forced to enter a cafe in Paris to find a civilized 
convenience for his natural wants. But in an American city, where 
we are ever on the alert to jail offenders against the proprieties, we 
commit the most asinine impropriety of all in omitting structures 
imperatively demanded by the laws of hygiene. Perhaps the saloons 
had some political effect in preventing the use of public comfort 
stations in American cities. It is more likely, however, that the 
omission was due to the false modesty of Anglo-Saxons civilization, 
which protends that man is shorn of all his animalities, while every 

act of his life shows he is an animal and a badly behaved one. 
¥ %■ % 

If the omission of public comfort stations were due to poverty 
there might be some excuse for the crime. In parts of South Amer- 
ica the public treasuries are without the money to expend on such 
highbrow contrivances as "comfort stations." The oi polloi having 
no overdrawn artistic conceptions of what belongs to the scenery, 
tableaux are sometimes presented to travelers that would hardly 
find a place in Pathe's pictorial news for the movies. 

That we do not have similar pictures on Market Street is to be 
credited more to the physical heroism of our public than the wisdom 
of our Supervisors. 

It is an astonishing thing that our County Medical Society has 
not taken up this subject. It cannot be that the profession is will- 
ing to close its eyes to a public neglect which has a tendency to 
keep the hospitals full. 

Our civic barbarism, for such it may be styled, is on a par with 
the conditions of Paris in the sixteenth century, to which Balzac 
refers in his "Contes Drolatiques." The King being out dining with 
his suite at a private residence, the festive hostess, reflecting the 
manners of her day, played the gentle practical joke of putting 
jalap in the courtier's soup and locking the toilet door downstairs. 
One can imagine the rest. In their dire extremity the victims dashed 
out on the public street while the jocose King roared with laughter 
over the predicament of his ministers of state, finance and justice 
without any "comfort station" to shelter them. Our eager moralists 
who have closed 3000 places of refuge for the "man in the street" 
in San Francisco might peruse Balzac's skit on the Paris streets four 
centuries ago. 

•f •¥ -¥ 

I must apologize to my readers for bringing forward this subject, 
but the dense ignorance of our officials and the reactionary fanatic- 
ism .of our reformers must be assailed by direct attack. The subject 
is a most serious one. Aur ridiculous false modesty is an out- 
growth of superstition, dating back to the Dark Ages, in which it 
was taught that the more mankind departed from the laws of 
Nature, the better his chances of going right to heaven and being 
ushered to a front seat by St. Peter. We find in the lives of the 
Holy Saints — thousands of them — many proofs that Salvation and 



Nature were diametrically opposed. That superstition still exists in 
India, where numbers of "holy men" torture themselves to gain 
celestial approval. They hold their arms above their heads for 
years, until the limbs wither and so remain. They make their beds 
on the teeth of harrows and subject themselves to many forms of 
torture to please God. The order of monks who Christianized the 
California savages were flagellants who beat themselves with whips 
and chains to make valid their claims to eternal glory. Marriage 
was discouraged, though the mating of animals is ostensibly the 
primary purpose of life on this globe of ours. 

So we have arrived at our Puritanical aversion to calling a spade 
a "spade." We have become ashamed of our animal ancestors and 
wish it forgotten that we have any carnal desires, though we have 
the largest divorce record the world has ever known, and we murder 
15,000 of our fellow citizens every year. We have almost gotten 
over the prudish habit of frowning when a leg is not called "a limb," 
and make an exhibit of the member such as has not been excelled 
since the cave dwellers. But a bull is still a "gentleman cow" and 
the tobacco manufacturer who uses a majestic Durham bull to ad- 
vertise his wares has had to disguise the gender of the beast by 
printing a fence rail in front of the masculine part of the beast. 

Worst of all, our repudiations of animalism and naturalness is the 
omission of public conveniences in American cities of large popula- 
tion. When we have not got further away than that from the 
superstitions of the Dark Ages anything — including prohibition 
tyranny — is possible. 



Brother Crothers Over Modest 

Talk about dual personalities! Brother Crothers of the Bulletin 
makes the Doctor Jekyl-and-Mr. Hyde boys look like rubes. When 
Fremont Older was ostensibly editor. Brother Crothers attributed all 
the tropic flavor of the Bulletin to his employe — the front-page biog- 
raphies that set the Christian Endeavorers goggle— eyed. Ah, how 
well we remember them! The gas company had big bills against 
all the apartment houses those days. How we burned the midnight 
lights perusing the confessions of ladies who told how it felt to turn 
their charms into fine clothes! Our sisters, cousins and aunts bor- 
rowed the fascinating copies from us to learn facts that many of the 
unmarried sex would like to know without asking raw questions. 
Then there were all the edifying essays from life-termers, who 
proved that only the honest men go to prison and the robbers into 
trade. Never were we in such close and confidential touch with 
the Tenderloin and the State prison. The minutes seemed hours 
while waiting for the afternoon editions. 

How our hearts sank when we heard that Brother Crothers had 
severed journalistic connection with his executive officer who made 
a doormat out of the old-fashioned bogey of Right and Wrong. 
Henceforth we would be compelled to solace our sub-conscious in- 
iquity with holimies worthy of Father Joe McQuade and the Rev. 
Doctor Clampett at their best. But behold a miracle! The wicked 
editor on whom Brother Crothers laid all the curses of the righteous 
displays in his new job, none of the radical tendencies that kept 
Ellis Street and San Quentin in a ferment, while he drew pay on 
the Bulletin. But stranger to relate, the latter publication holds to 
its aerial flight amongst astonished angels, scattering them like scared 
seagulls and causing Satan to yelp with joy like a boozy cowboy 
on a bucking steer. There is never an end to the quips and quirks 
of our liveliest evening sheet. Bandit Gardiner instructs the rising 
generation how to dodge the primal curse of hard work by pro- 
ficiency in the noble art of train robbing. A learned botanist de- 
scribes the manifold advantages of rustic benches in Golden Gate 
Park for moonlight trysts. "Sinning isn't so bad if you have learned 
the art of sinning charmingly," chuckles Brother Crothers in his ver- 
satile newspaper, for undoubtedly he is the real author, inspiration 
and sustaining force of its originality. All the talk about an erratic 
managing editor being responsible was fudge — a mere trick of the 
trade — equivalent to saying: "Blame it on my wicked partner." 

Brother Crothers cannot thus push away from his the literary 
crown. Fate will overcome his modesty and fasten the emblem of 
intellectual superiority on his brow. The Hall of Fame will perpet- 
uate his worth as the Rabelais of America. 



California Advertiser for July 30, 1921 



Temperamental, but on the Job 

Old Joaquin Miller was a wizard for free publicity. His long hair, 
long whiskers and long boots gave him a perpetual meal ticket. 
But Daughter Juanita has pop skinned a mile in working the news- 
papers with her confessions on "Lotus Love" and the amorous swain 
who blew in one day and blew out double quick as soon as the 
movies got the pictures of the sweet babes of the wood. Juanita 
got $400 a week for that stunt, while the suckers bit and paid admis- 
sion to the show. How much will the temperamental maiden get for 
her next picture? How many years in jail ought the editors get 
for helping the fake? 



Against an Anglo-Japanese Alliance 

N advocating the abandonment of an exclusive Anglo-Japanese 
alliance and the adoption of a friendly agreement in which 
America should be a party, the Manchester Guardian remarks: 

"The orginal motive of that alliance has disappeared. It was 
a protective measure against Russia and Germany. Has any valid 
motive taken its place? We have two interests to protect — our 
trade with China, which any closing of the open-door might imperil, 
and the security of the Dominion bordering on the Pacific. But is 
a military alliance necessary to their protection? And is it possible 
to enter on a new military alliance with Japan without turning the 
edge of it against the United States, the only Power remaining, 
except ourselves, which can be regarded as a possible rival of 
Japan? No convincing answer has so far been given to either of 
these questions, and it is unlikely that any such answer will be forth- 
coming. The vital and determining consideration in the whole mat- 
ter must be our relations with the United States. A close understand- 
ing and friendly co-operation between ourselves and the United 
States should be the primary aim. the determining consideration of 
all our external policy — its very cornerstone. With such an under- 
standing not only our own peace but the peace of the world is 
secure. Without it nothing is secure. America makes no demand, 
no suggestion. She leaves the whole matter absolutely to our dis- 
cretion and to that of the Dominions, acting in consultation with us. 
But there can be no doubt as to her real attitude. She paid little 
heed to the old alliance, when all the conditions were different. But 
the question of the Pacific has assumed an altogether new import- 
ance now that Japan is left completely dominant in the East and 
unassailable in her own waters, and America ignores the alliance no 
longer. No saving clause introduced into the renewed alliance, which 
provided that under no circumstances could it involve us in hostil- 
ities with the United States, could suffice to neutralize the unfor- 
tunate effect which such an exclusive alliance must have on Ameri- 
can opinion and on our relations with America. The Dominions arc 
just as conscious of this danger as we can be, and even Mr. Hughes, 
while advocating a renewal of the alliance as a means of safeguard- 
ing Australia from any possibility of trouble, makes it an express 
condition that whatever is done should be done with the entire good- 
will of the United States. This being the case, would it not be far 
better to have no exclusive alliance at all. but. instead, a friendly 
agreement to which America should be a party, and would this not 
be. in fact, better for Japan as well as for ourselves? America is 
even now proposing negotiations between the three Powers on the 
question of limitation of naval armaments. This is a beginning. 
Why not carry it farther? Japan's naval and commercial position 
in the East is very strong. Nobody threatens it. She has only to 
develop her natural resources and the advantage of her position 
peaceably in order to secure everything that is needful to her. It 
is. we are convinced, by such a common understanding and friendly 
accord that the interests of all the parties and of the world at large 
can best be secured." 



THE DEAN OF CORSET MAKERS 

It is not generally known by the millions of women who improve 
their forms by corsets that they are more indebted to David Hale 
Fanning of Worcester. Mass.. for their important aid to elegance 
and style than to any person in the world. He it was who first under- 
took to transform the corset from a clumsy mechanical contrivance 
to an artistic model of lightness, comfort and simplicity. 

For sixty years David Hale Fanning has been improving the corset 



and is still hale and energetic in spite of his ninety years. They sit 
on him as gracefully as many a man of half his age. 

Mr. Fanning is the president, as well as the founder, of the Royal 
Worcester Corset Company of .Worcester, Mass. He himself made 
the first corset which was sent out of his factory sixty years ago, 
and it would be difficult to realize that the fair sex at that time 
considered the prevailing style like "a perfect 36" and a model of 
elegance. 

The fashionable corset in those days consisted of five pieces 
sewed together, and with a few steels and eyelets that would not 
satisfy a grandmama today. To compare it with a fine up-to-date 
product of the Royal Worcester Corset Company now would be like 
contrasting the first railroad engine with a locomotive of the Over- 
land Limited. 

Having put his hand to the manufacture or corsets, David Hale Fan- 
ning was not the man to halt. To his ever-progressive mind the fair 
sex owes many changes to meet the fashions. There was the skele- 
ton or open-ribbed corset of 1870, the "Grecian bend" of 1876, the 
"French Hip" and the "Dowager" of later days. 




FOR the Man who would have his 
dress an expression of self, in its 
correctness and evident quality — 
commend him to our Made-to-Measure 
Dres^ Shirts, Robes, Tuxedo Shirts, Paja- 
mas.Sporl Shirts, Underwear, Neckwear 




WHY SI YORKWHEN YOU 

CAN \ ICE AT HO': 

D. C. HEGER 

116-118 Kearny St. 




The EYE and the BRAIN 

mory. Headache, Dizziness, Weak, 
Inflamed, Smarting, Sensitive or Gluey 
loating Spots, Crusty or Granu- 
lated Eyelids, Astigmatism, Watery Eyes 
and inability to sec objects clearly — all 
■ mptoms and many other ailments 
can be directly or indirectly attributed to 

STRAIN. 
I"0 RELIEVE THESE AILMENTS YOU 

MIST REMOVE THE CAUSE 
The latest and most scientific instruments 
are u«ed in examining children's eyes and 
complicated cases of eye defects. 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

EXCLUSIVE EYESIGHT SPECIALIST 

Charter Member American Association of 

Opticians 

Francisco 

960 MARKET STREET 

Between Mason and Taylor 
SAN' FRANCISCO 



10 



San Francisco News Letter and 





^nNANgALJ 




IT IS ASTONISHING what foolish ideas 
are advanced by those who are leaders of 
labor regarding the reductions in wages now 
going on in industries all over the world. It 
is said by these men, who, by the way, 
know better, that the labor wage is being re- 
duced because manufacturers desire to take 
advantage of the depression in order to in- 
crease their profits. Nothing could be wider 
of the mark than this. 

This comment, on the part of those who 
are supposed to lead in labor circles, is ill 
advised and mischievous. The depression 
and unemployment exist because the times 
are out of balance. It is necessary before 
there can be general employment and pros- 
perity that the balance be once more nicely 
adjusted. This readjustment must be brought 
about by changes in prices and in wages. 
This will establish the balance and enable 
us to make an exchange of commodities on 
a basis fair to all. It isn't fair when one- 
half of the population has lost about one- 
half of its purchasing power that the other 
half should go right on, as it has right along, 
and not take any note of the plight of the 
other half of the world. The depreciation 
of our money through war influences was 
not a permanent or a natural development. 
Fair play requires that the wages in all forms 
of industry shall rise or fall together. And, 
if this is done, there is then no attendant 
disturbance. When the balance is disturbed, 
and any class of people suffer loss of income, 
then business becomes bad in other indus- 
tries and workingmen and women are thrown 
out of employment. A general readjustment 
must take place before there can be a gen- 
eral re-employment in all industries. Every 
working man and woman should make the 
sacrifice now for the general good, and the 
quicker this sacrifice is accomplished the 
sooner will prosperity return in industrial 
lines. 

Banking officials in San Francisco are of 
the opinion that the time will soon be at 
hand when a client will get something be- 
sides conversation in applying for a loan. 
The danger point has been passed. There 
need be no surprise if there is a gradual 
elimination of the lame duck in trade from 
now on. If the banks are in a better posi- 
tion to lend money, they are also less vul- 
nerable than there were a while ago. Plenty 
have been carried because it was dangerous 
to refuse extensions. With the coming of 
better times this danger is, to a certain ex- 
tent, eliminated, and it may be expected the 
crippled merchant will be led to the sacri- 
ficial altar without compunction. 

3£ Ifi 9 

The war being waged between capital and 
labor is now going on very quietly, but also 



very effectually, as far as the employing end 
of it is concerned. It doesn't appear that 
those who have the leadership, on the part 
of the employing interests, are arbitrary or 
excessive in their demands, and, on the part 
of labor, a great percentage has seen the 
necessity of liquidation. 

Those who are behind the movement 
should remember that the balance we have 
spoken of should not be disturbed, but ad- 
justed with the utmost nicety, and the re- 
tailer who is profiteering should be dis- 
ciplined and brought into line. We are aware 
of the fact that, in some lines, there has 
been a sufficient recession. In others this 
is not so. The proof is found quite easily 
in the excessive costs of certain articles. Re- 
tail trade just now is simply buying for the 
moment, and there is no great stocking of 
shelves. All seem waiting for further whole- 
sale drops in prices, which will not, in most 
cases, occur. In the meantime, the retailer 
in some lines is getting rid of sjiop-worn 
goods at prices which were the vogue just 
after the armistice. 

SHIPPING — The news of moment in ship- 
ping circles is the dropping of W. R. Grace 
interest by Mr. John Rossiter. Mr. Rossiter 
is one of the ablest men we have in this 
country in the shipping line, and he will, 
from now on, confine his energies to the ex- 
pansion and development of the Pacific Mail 
Steamship Company and the Sperry Flour 
Company. For some time past there have 
been rumors of various kinds afloat regard- 
ing W. R. Grace & Co. It is probable that 
Mr. Rossiter found the affairs of the Grace 
concern in such shape that they made too 
much of a demand on his time and vitality. 
It was known that he had devoted a large 
amount of his time in working out plans for 
meeting contingencies created as a result of 
the armistice. The affairs of Grace & Co. 
will be watched with interest from now on. 
It is not known who will eventually take the 
helm at this point. The firm has maintained 
offices all over the world and had become a 
great factor in trans-Pacific business before 
the war. 

The action of the engineers in voting to 
go back to work for the private steamship 
operators on the American Plan has broken 
the back of the strike. This action of the 
engineers was predicted by the SAN FRAN- 
CISCO NEWS LETTER at the beginning of 
the unpleasantness. Any further delay in 
acknowledging themselves beaten would not 
have affected, but only delayed the result. 
No one can compute the loss that has been 
visited on this country by the striking sea- 
men. This is a direct loss of business by 
the carriers and a loss of wage by the men, 



but the indirect loss is a far greater one to 
the public at large and is past computation. 
The strike has affected our standing abroad 
and has injured us as exporters and import- 
ers to such an extent that it will take a year 
and more to offset the harm done, if it can 
be offset at all. A strike or a lockout is 
always an economic loss, and most of the 
time cannot be other than an irretrievable 
loss, no matter which side wins. The strike 
and the lockout are the weapons of barbar- 
ians. The American Plan provides for arbi- 
tration and for collective bargaining, while 
doing away with the intolerance and the 
tyranny of unionism. Whether this plan may 
be worked out so as to avoid the pitfalls and 
the dangers which seemingly always attend 
anything that is forceful and compelling re- 
mains to be seen. 

With the strike at an end there should be 
improved conditions as to shipping. It does 
not mean, however, that all vessels now idle 
will steam over the Seven Seas. It means 
that those now under charter may continue 
and have a chance in the competition with 
England and other nations on the high seas. 
Conditions in export and import circles are 
dependent on many other factors for their 
prosperity. There is, however,, a great im- 
provement in Europe. The Irish questions is 
nearing a settlement of some kind. In Po- 
land, Germany and Silesia things have 
quieted down. In Italy the industrial condi- 
tions are improved. In France and Belgium 
and in England there is marked increase in 
public confidence. 

The exchange situation has its ups and 
downs, but is becoming more favorable to 
trade all over the world. President Hard- 
ing's call has been favorably answered, and 
this has had a good effect. The prospect of 
America looking favorably on a refunding 
of the allied debts has had a very good ef- 
fect in Europe and in Latin countries. There 
is not to be a quick transition from bad to 
good times, however, and there must be a 
longer time elapse before prosperity comes 
knocking at the doors. As long as the bal- 
ance of trade stands so heavily against for- 
eign nations we may not expect a radical 
readjustment. As long as the mass of Ameri- 
can people does not realize the bearing our 
foreign trade has on the domestic affairs of 
the country and on the welfare of the peo- 
ple in the interior of the country, we may 
not expect any great resumption of activity 
in the manufacturing centers, because just 
so long will we maintain the closed-door 
against the sale of our surplus industrial pro- 
duction. We must sell that surplus or there 
is sure to be unemployment. WE MANU- 
FACTURE MORE THAN WE CAN CON- 
SUME AT HOME AND WE MUST SELL 

ABROAD. Unless we sell abroad we will 
have idleness and want at home. Unless we 
buy abroad and sell abroad and invest 
abroad we are going to have idle ships and 
the scheme of our mercantile marine will 
soon be nothing but a beautiful, vanishing 
dream and the reality of rotting and rusting 
hulks. 

At this particular time, when everything 



California Advertiser for July 30, 1921 



11 



is slack, it is very hard to understand the 
state of mind which would cause union lead- 
ers to take a stand favoring a general strike. 
The customary tactics of unions is to strike 
when there is a glut of employment and jobs 
are begging for men and not when men are 
begging for jobs. Usually, union leaders 
have more good generalship at their com- 
mand, and among them are men of great 
capacity who readily understand when the 
conditions do not admit of a continuance of 
high wages. Of course, the action by the 
unions to call a general strike is to prevent 
the equal liquidation of wage. Men in other 
than the building trades are afraid it is go- 
ing to be "next" for them. And so it is, and 
so it should be. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

There is no good reason why, if wages are 
reduced for the good of all and to create a 
more widespread employment, that any 
should escape the reduction. Eventually, 
all must be reduced in conformity with the 
reduction already accepted by those who 
wish to be employed in the building trades. 
On the other hand, there is some reduction 
being affected in the cost of materials. Lum- 
ber prices have been broken down to some 
extent. Cement costs must come down, too. 
All must share, by sacrifice, in creating the 
future prosperity. To call a general strike 
is foolishness. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

History does not record that general 
strikes are a very successful means of ac- 
complishing results; more often they are un- 
qualified economical disasters, without re- 
deeming or compensating features whatso- 
ever. The city of San Francisco will not 
look with any greater kindness on the labor 
unions because of the infliction of wide- 
spread injury to all, and the unions cannot 
win in this fight. The people are aware of 
the fact now that the unions are attempting 
to create a privileged class — privileged to 
thrive and profiteer endlessly after everyone 
else has accepted the situation and has vol- 
untarily assumed the loss necessary to re- 
store the economic equilibrium. We have 
reached a day when, in and out of the 
unions, there is much dissatisfaction with the 
unionism of the kind that has retarded the 
growth and prevented the continuing pros- 
perity of San Francisco. Unionism must 
change its tactics and adopt constructive in- 
stead of destructive and criminal policies in 
order to win back public sympathy and con- 
fidence. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

INSURANCE — The moral hazard question 
is again to the fore. This time it seems 
that some doubt has been expressed regard- 
ing the smaller picture houses. In some sec- 
tions of the country the movies are not as 
popular as they were, and the opinion has 
been expressed by some insurance men that 
the interest "pinching out" would leave the 
smaller houses without business, and that 
when this occurred the moral hazard would 
come into play and these houses would not 
then be desirable fire risks. The expression 
is that the larger houses will continue to 
thrive. To a man up a tree the reverse 
would seem to be the case — that a smaller 



house would survive where a larger one 
would have to go to the wall. That is, un- 
less the larger house went in for musical 
features and vaudevillian acts. At any rate, 
there does not seem any abatement in inter- 
est in and around San Francisco, and the 
moral hazard does not seem to play a great 
part here. The best way to do is to keep 
abreast of the conditions and to watch the 
patronage of the various houses. 
¥ ¥ ¥ 

The public should be interested in knowing 
what a fearful toll in money losses alone the 
fires around the Fourth cost us. We have 
spoken before of the need of preventing pre- 
ventable fires. Almost all fires are prevent- 
able and almost all fires are caused by care- 
lessness. Around San Francisco bay and in 
various counties of California the fires of the 
Third and Fourth' of July cost in property 
less nearly $3,000,000. Marysville had a 
fire which showed losses of more than 
$700,000. There were twenty thousand 
acres burned over in Solano County, and the 
loss there aggregated $1,000,000 or more. 
In Butte County the losses were more than 
$125,000, and in Yolo in excess of a quarter 
of a million. Most of these fires were "road- 
side fires," caused by campers or hikers and 
cigarette smokers. If everybody determined 
to be careful such losses would not occur. 
The newspapers should hammer away at the 
people on this subject, in season and out. 
and then, PERHAPS, there would be fewer 
fires than there are now. 

MINING — The conditions at Tonopah are 
much improved, and it is the expectation of 
the operators of mines that the strike order. 
which has been in force for some time, will 
be rescinded very soon. The Silver State 
Chemical Company is about to complete the 
erection of its reduction plant at Winne- 
mucca. This plant will be used for reduc- 
ing through a chemical leaching process with 



a view to extracting paint, dye and chemical 
materials from the metal contents of the ores. 
Oil development in California, Montana 
and Wyoming continues unabatedly. In 
Montana the developments have not been 
what was expected, and in some sections 
wells that came in strong have very quickly 
"petered out." So far Montana has not 
shown itself as promising a great oil pro- 
duction. That there is oil in Montana, there 
is no doubt, but that the oil is in commercial 
quantity is what is doubted by a good many 
experts. The man who credits himself in his 
advertisements with putting Montana on the 
oil map through the original development in 
the Devil's Basin District has at last suc- 
ceeded in going after oil with his own syndi- 
cate. This development is in the Kevin field. 
All indications point to a great "oil dome" 
at Kevin. A few more days should tell the 
story. 

In another district of Montana the genius 
who advanced the theory that oil flowed in 
underground rivers and that he had per- 
fected a divining rod of some kind to locate 
the greatest flow has had a fine chance to 
make a convincing demonstration and has 
failed. A number of California and San 
Francisco capitalists, usually hard-headed 
enough men, were gulled into putting money 
behind such an idea to locate oil and water 
wells. The magic wand did not locate oil 
and failed to find water. Somebody is out 
a nice little sum of money and in a lot of 
experience. 



Affection's Fount — Wife (pleadingly) : 
I'm afraid. Jack, you do not love me any 
more — anyway, not as well as you used to. 
Husband: Why? "Because you always let 
me get up to light the fire now." "Non- 
sense, my love! 'tour getting up to light 
the fire makes me love you all the more."-- 
Watchman-Examiner. 



Spend Your Vacation 

IN THE 

Beautiful Feather River Country 



VKTHF LEVEL OF 
THE SEA IN THE HElRT of THE MERRAS 



WESTERN 



Reached via 

PACIFIC RAILROAD 



"The Feather Rirer Route" 

— Numerous Resorts along the famous FEATHER RIVER and near the many 
lakes and streams where fish and game are abundant. 

WRITE FOR ILIA STR.Mrn FOLDERS 

•Cick'l Offices: 50 POST STREET and FERRY BUILDING-Telephone Sutter 1651 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Company in America." 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



FIRE AUTOMOBILE WINDSTORM 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 

REASONABLE RATES 



12 



San Francisco News Letter and 




ociot 



--&2T- 



Engagements 



THE engagement of Miss Florence Rus- 
sell, a member of one of California's 
oldest and most distinguished families, 
who has won success as a danseuse and a 
motion picture player, to Philip Hum of Chi- 
cago and Hollywood, a senario writer, was 
announced by Miss Russell's mother, Mrs. 
Atherton Russell. 

Miss Russell's grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Faxon Atherton (Gertrude Atherton) were 
leaders of society in California's pioneer 
days and were the first people to establish 
an estate at Menlo Park. Miss Russell is 
related to Mrs. Edward Eyre, Mrs. Perry 
Eyre, Mrs. Macondray Moore, Mrs. Jane 
Selby Hayne, Mrs. Herman Phleger, Mrs. 
Alvah Kaime and Mrs. Inez Macondray. 

Hum came to California three years ago 
from Chicago, and is rated as one of the 
most successful scenario writers in Holly- 
wood. He is head of the scenario depart- 
ment of one of the big studios and has made 
his home with John Fleming Wilson, the 
writer. 

Miss Russell returned to her home here 
after her work with Douglas Fairbanks. Hum 
is visiting in San Francisco, and with his 
fiancee spent the week-end with Mr. and 
Mrs. Percy Morgan at Los Altos. 
— Miss Margaret Madison has set the date 
for her marriage to Mr. Wakefield Baker for 
September 12. The wedding will take place 
at St. Luke's Church and later there will be 
a reception at the home of Miss Madison's 
aunt, Mrs. Frederick Beaver, in Webster 
Street. It will be a large wedding, and as 
Miss Madison is one of the most popular girls 
in society, there is much interest in the ar- 
rangements. 



Wtllardfr 

Y Y 139-153 GEARY ST. 

(j m a n tjlpp ape I 
top (JUomen 



an 



SKjIc arvcl Quality 
Without ExtraVaJaivee 



y Wllard^ 




^"*3S3S5s*BP*^ 



^ 1 



Luncheons 

— Mrs. Joseph L. Jayne was the principal 
guest at a luncheon which Mrs. Edson Adams 
gave on Wednesday. Mrs. Jayne has been 
living at Vallejo for the past few months, 
since the illness of Admiral Jayne, who has 
been retired from active service. 
— Mrs. Willard Chamberlain gave a lunch- 
eon on Sunday at the San Mateo Polo Club 
and had for guests Mrs. Jane Selby Hayne. 
Mrs. Elkins de Guigne, Messrs. Archie and 
Hiram Johnson Jr., Richard Schwerin and 
Russell Wilson. 

— Mrs. J. Leroy Nickel gave an informal 
luncheon and bridge part on Thursday at 
Menlo Park, where she and Mr. Nickel and 
her sister. Miss Miller, are passing the sum- 
mer at their country place. 
— A series of Tuesday luncheons has been 
established at the Burlingame Country Club 
for the summer months and the afternoon 
is spent at bridge or tennis. Quite a number 
of women gathered at the club this week, 
among them being Mrs. Sydney Cloman, 
Mrs. Frederick W. Pritchard, Mrs. Bernard 
Ford, Mrs. Williard Chamberlain, Mrs. Sam- 
uel Knight, Mrs. Thomas Eastland, Mrs. 
Frederick McNear and Mrs. Andrew Welch. 
— Mrs. Charles Josselyn gave a luncheon and 
bridge party on Wednesday at her home at 
Woodside and entertained several friends 
from town. In the party were Mrs. Ira 
Pierce, Mrs. Anson P. Hotaling Jr., Mrs. 
Washington Dodge, Mrs. Van Dyke Johns, 
Mrs. J. Leroy Nickel, Mrs. Frank Deering 
and Mrs. Richard Sprague. 
— A luncheon was given on Friday at the 
Palace by Miss Helen Van Winkle in honor 
of her niece. Miss Anna Van Winkle, whose 
marriage to Dr. Kenneth Dole will take place 
at the home of the bride's parents on Au- 
gust 20. Miss Van Winkle is the daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Henry L. Van Winkle. She 
is a graduate of the University of California. 
Miss Caroline Knowles will act as maid of 
honor and Mrs. John J. Smith (Evelyn Van 
Winkle) is to be matron of honor. Follow- 
ing the honeymoon the young couple will 
take up their residence in Redlands. 
—Mrs. George Kelham entertained several 
friends from town at luncheon Tuesday at 
the Hotel Rafael. Mr. and Mrs. Kelham are 
passing the summer in San Rafael. 
— Mrs. L. S. Sherman gave a luncheon on 
Saturday at the Town and Country Club for 
Miss Fanny Selferth of New Orleans, who 
has come to California to take a course in 
English and dramatics at the University of 
California summer school. The other guests 
were Mrs. A. P. Black, Mrs. Ernest Simpson. 
Mrs. J. H. Alco and Miss Marian Black. 
—In hohor of Mrs. Frederick W. Sharon. 



who has returned after a winter and spring 
in New York, Mrs. George W. Kelham en- 
tertained twelve guests at a luncheon Tues- 
day afternoon at the Hotel Rafael across the 
bay. Mr. and Mrs. Kelham are passing the 
summer months at their country home in San 
Rafael. 



Dinners 

— Mr. and Mrs. Louis Titus, who recently 
took possession of their new home at Bur- 
lingame, which was formerly the Cheever 
Cowdin place, gave a dinner Monday night 
for Judge J. C. McReynolds of Washington. 
— A number of the friends of Mr. and Mrs. 
Horace Hill gave them a surprise party Sun- 
day evening at their home at Los Altos. 
It was their eight wedding anniversary and 
about forty friends arranged a picnic dinner 
for them. A barbecue was held, and after 
dinner there was dancing. 

Mrs. Hill's brother and sister-in-law, Mr. 
and Mrs. John Gallois, came down from 
Lake Tahoe for the event and others there 
were Mr. and Mrs. Augustus Taylor, Mr. and 
Mrs. Percy Morgan, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur 
Chesebrough, Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Schill- 
ing, Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Ford, Mr. and 
Mrs. Fentriss Hill, Mr. and Mrs. William 
Duncan, Mrs. Will Taylor, Miss Marion Zeile 
and Miss Marjorie Josselyn. 
— Mr. and Mrs. Templeton Crocker enter- 
tained a group of friends at their home in 
San Mateo recently in honor of Mr. and 
Mrs. Walter Richards. The other guests 
were Mr. and Mrs. Walter S. Martin, Mr. 
nid Mrs. Eugene Murphy, Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry H. Scott, Miss Marion Zeile, Joseph 0. 
Tobin and Captain Ronald Banon. Miss 
Zeile has been the guest of Mrs. Crocker for 
several weeks. 



— An interesting dinner was given last Sat- 
urday at the Jackson home at Napa Soda 



When in Santa Clara Valley, see the Val- 
ley from the scenic electric lines. 

Trolley trips start from San Jose or PaJo 
Alto. 

PENINSULA RAILWAY CO. 
San Jose, Cal. 



Tk 



FOR 

EsdlBiisnv© 
EnMt®or^iiijMn<8Bn& 



(Management of 



Halsey E. Manwaring 




California Advertiser for July 30, 1921 



13 



Springs in celebration of the birthday of 
Andrew Jackson. The hosts were Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank Glass, who have taken the his- 
toric house through the summer. Among the 
guests were Mrs. Peter Fletcher and her 
daughter. Miss Harriet Fletcher, of New 
York; Mrs. Max Rothschild of Burlingame, 
Mrs. Harriet Small and Miss Marian Small. 
— Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Kimble gave an 
informal dinner and dance Saturday evening 
at their home in Palo Alto for their daughter, 
Miss Barbara Kimble. 

— Mrs. Winfield Scott Davis was hostess at 
a dinner party at her home in Ross Tuesday 
night, following this with bridge. There 
were more than a dozen guests, all of them 
being women, the husbands being at the 
Bohemian Club jinks and elsewhere for the 
week. 



Teas 



— Mr. and Mrs. Alexander D. Lilley have 
been entertaining as their house guest in 
San Rafael Miss Elise Lilley, who is visiting 
here from the Atlantic Coast. Compliment- 
ing her cousin, Miss Ethel Lilley entertained 
at an informal tea Tuesday afternoon at her 
summer home, where she had as her guests 
more than a score of the younger matrons 
and belles of Ross Valley and San Rafael. 
— In honor of Miss Elizabeth Hazelhurst. 
who is enjoying a visit of several weeks in 
Ross Valley as the guest of Mrs. Ralph Pal- 
mer, Mrs. William* Kent Jr. entertained at 
bridge tea Monday afternoon. The affair 
was held at the Kent home. 



Intimations 

— Visitors from England at the Fairmont are 
Sir George and Lady Marks, the former of 
whom is one of the noted engineers of Great 
Britain. He is a member of parliament and 
was at one time consulting engineer to the 
late Duke of Saxe-Coburg Gotha. 
— Sympathy is being expressed for Mr. 
Charles R. Blyth for the accident which oc- 
curred at Burlingame on Saturday, when he 
was badly cut and bruised. He was driving 
his car from his home in Burlingame to town 
when, to avoid a collision with another car, 
he made a sudden turn and hit a telegraph 
pole. The car was wrecked. 
— Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Whittell have bought 
a house on Broadway between Fillmore and 
Scott streets and expect to take possession 
of it on the first of August. They are hav- 
ing the house remodeled and decorated. It 
was formerly the residence of Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry Smith. 

— Mrs. Philip E. Bowles, who has been seri- 
ously ill for the past two weeks, is conva- 
lescent and well on the way to recovery. 



"BEAUTY SALON"— 




THE POWDER PUFF— 




Now under New Management 


Hair restored to its natural color. 




Hair Dyeing and Bleaching. 




Katherine McNamara— Marcel 


Waver 


Inei Dere. formerly of the City of Paris 


212 Stockton St. Suite 


305 







In Town and Out 

— Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Cox are occupying 
their very beautiful home at Pebble Beach 
and intend staying the rest of the summer. 
— Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Walter have returned 
to the Fairmont Hotel after a visit of several 
weeks at Lake Tahoe. 

— Mr. and Mrs. William Griffith Henshaw 
and their daughter, Mrs. Alia Chickering, re- 
turned from Europe on Sunday and are at 
their apartment at Stanford Court. They 
will soon go to their estate at Montecito to 
pass ther remainder of the summer. 
— Mr. and Mrs. Albert J. Dibblee and the 
Misses Anne, Peggy and Polly Dibblee have 
returned to their summer home in Ross Val- 
ley after several weeks' visit at Lake Tahoe. 
— Mr. and Mrs. William Parrott have gone 
to Montecito to pass the ensuing fortnight 
at guests of Mr. and Mrs. Leigh Sypher. 
They motored south Saturday. 



SPIRITED DANCES AT TECHAU 

Madge Rush, one of the cleverest rythmic 
solo dancers ever seen in a San Francisco 
Revue is appearing this week at Techau 
Tavern. Her numbers include a starlingly 
gowned and unusual Jazz Toe Dance, a spir- 
ited Gypsy Dance and a quaintly Oriental 
Burmese novelty. 

The Techau Tavern Revue is also featur- 
ing Howard Evans, a clever dancer and 
singer, whose Chinese Jazz number, in which 
he is assisted by Ruby Adams and Rene 
Perry, is particularly successful. The pretty 
Revue Girls are also seen in a number of 
original numbers, and the entire Revue is 
spirited and artistic. 

After the theatre is unquestionably the 
most popular hour at Techau's. and the gay 
crowds are augmented every night by mem- 
bers of the motion picture and theatrical pro- 
fessions, who have elected Techau Tavern as 
their favorite rendezvous. 

The dance floor is ever-popular and guests 
enjoy dancing for prizes of Melachrino Ci- 
garettes and Gruenhagen's Nectar Fruit 
Chocolates. 



Why He Followed — The scene was a park 
on a boiling hot summer's day, and those 
walking therein were well-nigh exhasuted. 
Presently a very stout old lady came bustling 
along one of the paths, closely followed by 
a costermonger. Although she had twice 
commanded him to leave her, he had not 
taken the slightest notice, still keeping just 
behind. At last, quite disgusted, she turned 
angrily round and said. "Look here, my man. 
if you don't go away at once I shall call a 
policeman." "For goodness sake. mum. 
don't do that." he said, looking at her pa- 
thetically, "for ye're the on'y shady spot in 
the park." 



Caught Napping — Mr. De Seines (on 
being introduced to adored one's mother) : 
Pardon me, madam, but have we not met 
before? ^our face seems strangely familiar. 
Adored One's Mother: Yes. I am the 
woman who stood up before you for two 
whole miles in a street car the other day 




HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 



I • -SAN FRANCISCO. • 

A BIG HOTEL 
1WHEBE THE LITTLE THINGS COUNT j 



The Witchery and Charm 

OF THE 
NEW COMPOSITIONS 

PLAYED BY 

ART HICKMAN 

AND 
HIS FAMOUS ORCHESTRA 
WILL CAPTIVATE YOU IN 

THE GARDEN 

9 to I EVERY EVENING 



Thos J. Coleman 

Manager 



J. E. BIRMINGHAM Main Corridor 
» * * * * * 

PALACE HOTEL Opposite Rose Room 
* » * * * * 



JEWELS 

* * » 



In Platinum 

* * * 



REMODELING Old Styles Into New 

* * * * * * 

UNIQUE DESIGNS Time-Keeping Witches 

* * * * # * 

FINE JEWELRY Of All Descriptions 

* * * * * * 



EXPERT 



Repair Work 



ELECTROLYSIS 

Eye-brows arched and moles, warts and su- 
perfluous hair permanently removed by my 
latest improved multiple needle machine. 
Work guaranteed. 

MADAM STIVER 

133 Geary St.. Whitney Building. Suite 723 

Phone Douglas 5232 

Oakland, First Nat. Bank Bldg. 

Suite 424. Phone Oakland 2521 



A TREATMENT FOR THE SCALP 
AND HAIR. Scientifically correct, cosme- 
tically perfect, established and conducted by 
American Hospital Nurses, unqualifiedly en- 
dorsed and used by Eminent Physicians. 

THE FRANCES FOX INSTITUTE 

For the Scientific Care of the Hair 
Saw 306 Crceka Bdlduw Phone S I 

At Mirlei it Poa St... Su Ft. 



14 




^/tomohjh 



SOME WORDS OF ADVICE 

BEFORE starting out on a touring trip a 
motorist should first of all look over 
the tool box and see that it contains 
the necessary wrenches, such as open-end 
wrenches, an adjustable (or monkey) 
wrench, a stillson wrench and a spark plug 
socket wrench; a pair of pliers, also chain 
repair pliers, a mechanic's hammer, a large 
and small screwdriver, files, a spool of soft 
iron wire, a box each of assorted nuts, bolts 
and cotterpins. a box of extra tire valves, a 
tire pressure gauge, some extra spark plugs 
and rim lugs, a box of talcum powder, a few 
feet of high and low tension cable, a roll 
of tape, an extra valve and spring, a grease 
gun and an extra spring clip and bolts. 

Begin the journey with tires in good con- 
dition and with two extras (with covers), 
preferably inflated on rims; three extra 
tubes, carefully rolled and packed in burlap 
to keep from chafing; a box of tube patch- 
ing outfit for punctures and a blowout patch 
or inner boot. Carry a good jack, also a 
small piece of plank, 2x8x18 inches, to use 
as a base for the jack in soft ground. Weed 
chains, preferably two sets, are necessary 
equipment. A half dozen extra cross chains 
should be in the tool box. Carry a steel 
rope for towing, a collapsible canvas bucket 
and a five-gallon canvas water bag, also one 
upper and one lower rubber hose connec- 
tion for radiator, with clamps. Bring a two- 
pound box of cup grease and a gallon can 
of extra lubricating oil. 



Prepare for Baggage 

Equip the car with a folding parcel car- 
rier or use footman loops, through which ran 
webbing' straps for fastening parcels snugly. 
Similar loops may also be screwed to the 
tonneau floor to be used for strapping down 
suitcases or other baggage to keep them 
from shifting and annoying the passengers. 

See that the car is in good working order 
and all parts well lubricated before starting 
on the tour and that the battery is fully 
charged. Have the top in good shape and 
the curtains with no broken lights. 

Do not overload the car. Distribute the 
weight to equalize the strain on springs. Use 
soft water for radiator; rain water is best, 
continuous use of hard water is bad. Watch 
the brakes, making prompt adjustments to 
take up wear and renew brake lining when 
worn. Shift gear when motor begins to labor 
on a grade, do not strain it unnecessarily. 



Watch the alignment of the wheels. When 
driving watch the instrument board to see 
that the ammeter indicates charging the bat- 
tery by the generator. If there is no gene- 
rator on the car, have the battery tested 
often. 



San Francisco News Letter and 



When the car is climbing a hill or pulling 
through bad roads it is plainly shown. 

By experimenting with the common ani- 
line oil, such as is obtained from coal tar, 
and which is used as coloring matter, it 
will be noted that the bad effects of the poor 
fuel can be overcome. This can be obtained 
from most druggists at a cost which will keep 
the fuel economy about equal with that of 
high-test gasoline. About three ounces of 
this oil may be placed in the fuel tank with 
every gallon of gasoline to obtain the best 
results. 

It is no way harmful to any of the engine 
parts, and although the economy of this is 
questionable, there are times and places 
where its benefit may be easily noticed. 



Save the Tires 

Remember, that abrupt stops, quick starts 
and side skids are very bad for tires. Re- 
pair small lire cuts promptly. Have sand 
blisters or mud boils repaired as soon as 
they appear; they are due to underinflation. 
Use talcum powder when inserting tubes in 
Cc sings, but do not use too much. Do not 
drive in ruts; it wears out the side walls 
of the casings. Do not allow oil or grease 
to remain on the casings; wipe off with a 
rag moistened with gasoline. When using 
weed chains, do not adjust them too tightly; 
allow them to creep. Always drive with 
proper regard for the tires; avoid boulders, 
sharp stones and severe jolts. Remember, 
that wet rubber cuts. It is tough only when 
dry. Finally, keep the tires well inflated; 
this is excellent economy, using for fabric 
tires a pressure of 20 pounds for each inch 
of diameter and for cord tires 16 pounds. 
Use gauge to determine pressure accurately 
and make tests every morning. 

When stuck in a mudhole or on a sandy 
stretch, do not speed up the engine and 
"jump" the clutch. This will only cause the 
wheels to spin and the car to sink deeper. 
Open the throttle only far enough to keep 
the engine from stalling and engage the 
clutch slowly. The chances are that this 
method will procure traction. 



Noise in Rear Axle 
Noise in the rear axle may be caused by 
several different things. The construction 
of some differentials naturally produces a 
humming sound. This is not harmful. But 
if a harsh, grating noise is produced, or in 
a case of some cars if there is any noise at 
all there is a defect in the system which 
should be remedied. Some causes are lack 
of oil, use of the wrong grade or a poor 
p"'ar1e of oil. gears out of alignment, 
chipped, burred or broken teeth, or if the 
car is old the gears are undoubtedly worn, 
resulting in noise. 



Exhaust Pipe as Oil Indncator 

One way of telling if one or more cylin- 
ders are consuming too much oil is to watch 
the exhaust pipe as the engine is in opera- 
tion. If smoke comes from the pipe steadily 
all cylinders are receiving the same amount 
of oil, but is the smoke issues irregularly in 
puffs there is a possibility that some cylin- 
ders are being lubricated more than others. 
A constant stream of smoke may indicate 
too much oil in all cylinders. 



Knock Due to Overheating 

Overheating is a common cause of a 
knock which increases as the car is driven 
and is due to faulty lubrication or cooling 
and carbon deposits in the cylinders. The 
engine of a car which increases knocking 
as the car goes uphill has either an accumu- 
lation of carbon or the spark too far ad- 
vanced — possibly both. 



Mixtures for Poor Gasoline 

Anv gasoline with a low gravity test re- 
veals itself when the engine is laboring hard. 



Keaton Speaks at Santa Rosa 

R. H. Keaton, president of the Keaton 
Tire & Rubber Company, addressed the San- 
ta Rosa Territory "Keaton Dealers" on 
Tuesday, the 19th, using as his text, "Busi- 
ness is as good as you make it." Keaton, ac- 
companied by his wife and two children, had 
been visiting the springs in Lake County and 
stopped over at Santa Rosa as a guest of 
Douglas Allen before touring into the Eel 
River Country. 

The pessimistic attitude of some of the 
local dealers urged Keaton to accept the in- 
flation of Allen to make the address. Kea- 
ton said in part : "The slogan of the Chicago 
Tribune, '1921 will reward fighters,' is a 
good one. You must fight for your business 
these days and your ammunition must in- 
cvlde personal energy and perseverance, as 
veil as reil quality va'ue in the merchandise 
yen handle. 

"The Kenton Ti e & Rubber C"mnanv. as 
a whole, is doin" a much larger business in 
the States west of the Rockies than ever be- 
fore in the h's'n-v of the companv. pnd this 
result has o" 1 " been made possible bv fight- 
ing for it .-'--"•• right lines and including the 
above attribi' , os. 

"Business is as good as you make it." 



California Advertiser for July 30, 1921 



15 



Elgin's Remarkable Run 

L. B. Miller of Chicago bet a friend that 
he could drive his new Elgin Six coupe from 
Chicago to San Francisco in eleven days. 
He started on his long trip early on the 
morning of Saturday, June 25. Painted on 
each side of the hood of his car was the 
modest legend: "To win a bet — Chicago to 
Frisco." 

On Friday evening, July 1 — seven days 
later — he rolled down Market Street in San 
Francisco after one of the most remarkable 
transcontinental runs on record. He had 
covered 2,345 miles and used only 123 gal- 
lons of gasoline — an average of 19 miles to 
the gallon — and in a closed car. He used 
only three gallons of oil. He had no me- 
chanical or tire trouble and his telegram 
from San Francisco stated that the car was 
running even better at the finish than at the 
start of the trip. He made the entire trip 
alone. 

Mr. Miller is president of the Victor X-Ray 
Corporation, 236 South Robey Street, Chi- 
cago. He had just bought the car from 
the Northwest Motor Sales Corporation, 2554 
Milwaukee Avenue, Chicago. This is his 
third Elgin Six. 

The first night Mr. Miller reached Boone. 
Iowa, 372 miles from Chicago. He used I 7 
gallons of gasoline. The roads were good, 
but he passed through a heavy rainstorm. 

Kearney, Neb., was the stop at the end 
of the second day — the day's mileage, 367. 
The Iowa roads were good; those in Ne- 
braska heavy with dust and sand. Sixteen 
gallons of gasoline were used. 

The Elgin coupe left Kearney at 5 o'clock 
on the third morning, and 15 hours later 
rolled down the main street in Rock River, 
Wyo. — 417 miles in one day. Mr. Miller 
was now seven hours ahead of his schedule, 
and his telegram to the Elgin Motor Car Cor- 
poration said: "Will try for Salt Lake to- 
morrow." 

He left Rock River at 3 o'clock on the 
morning of June 28 and pulled into Sail 
Lake City at 4:30 the next morning, alter 
25 hours at the wheel. He had covered 402 
miles of bad road. He was 24 hours ahead 
of his schedule. 

At 3:30 the morning of June 30 he 
reached Ely, Nev., after covering 290 miles 
of Utah road, which he reported to be "the 
worst that is left open for traffic." Between 
Ely and Eureka, Nev.. he crossed four moun- 
tain ranges. 

And at 9:25 on the evening of Friday, 
July 1, he rolled into San Francisco, having 
covered 2,345 miles in seven days. The car 
was commandeered by the Mark Motor Com- 
pany, Elgin dealers in San Francisco, for ad- 
vertising purposes. 



Speedway Opening at Cotati 
The opening of the big speedway at Cotati 
will take place on Sunday, August 14. The 
official "three-A" sanction for the date has 
been received and there will be an oppor- 
tunity for Northern California motorists to 
see the fastest drivers in the world in action. 
There is no doubt that the track at Cotati 



will meet all expectations, as one of the fast- 
est, if not the fastest, automobile tracks in 
the country. A stock car event will be one 
of the features of the August 14 program, 
and several of the entrants in the Nevada 
1,000-mile road race at Reno, July I, will 
be in the Cotati speed event. 



A West Pointer 

Colonel Edgar S. Gonell, the new branch 
manager of the Marmon concern on the Pa- 
cific Coast, is a West Point graduate. He has 
given up his duties as manager of sales ex- 
tension for the Nordyke & Marmon Com- 
pany, at Indianapolis, to become associated 
with Al. G. Faulkner Company, Marmon dis- 
tributors for California, Nevada and the Ha- 
waiian Islands. 

He entered the air service in 1914 and 
soon attained the rank of lieutenant-colonel, 
serving as chief of the air staff with the A. 
E. F. He was awarded the Legion of Honor 
by France, the D. S. C. by England and the 
Distinguished Service Medal by the United 
States. He resigned from the army in 1920 
to take up the Marmon sales promotion 
work. Colonel Gorrell will have as his man- 
ager of sales W. E. Combes, formerly with 
the Marmon Company. 



Reinforcing Tires 

If the condition of fabric and tread of 
a blow-out tire casing, or one which has in- 
side breaks or bruises, warrants the cost of 
repair, a reliner covering the entire inner 
surface of the shoe can be inserted. If there 
is only one spot too weak to stand the air 
pressure, a blow-out patch should be applied 
before the reliner is inserted. Considerably 
more mileage is sometimes derived from a 
tire thus reinforced and inner tubes are pre- 
vented from chafing at broken .places in the 
casing. 



Oil for Differential 

A thin oil is not generally used in the 
transmission or differential because it would 
not have the cushioning effect of a heavy oil 
or grease, which is necessary to reduce wear 
and noise in the parts. Also light oil would 
soon have a tendency to run out at axle ends. 
Light oil is only used in tight-fitting or 
rapidly moving parts and where there is no 
heavy pressure. 



Made No Difference — From no place but 
Paris could this story have emanated. A 
customer at a counter of the Bon Marche 
had evidently decided ,o take his wife a 
birthday present of a blouse. "Here are 
some pretty ones,' raid the saleswoman, as 
she brought forward a number for his inspec- 
tion. "What color is it that you prefer?" 
"It makes no difference." "So?" said the 
girl, with her eyebrows lifted in surprise, 
"then I believe she would like this one. What 
size do you want, m'sieu?" "It makes no 
difference," for the second time. "Mon 
Dieu!" said the girl, "but I should say that 
it would make all the difference." "But, 
no," persisted the man, "I must take a 
present home for my wife for a certainty. 
but no matter what color I choose, or what 
size I take, it makes no difference, for in 
any case I shall have to come back with her 
tomorrow to have it changed!" 



Importance of Little TVngs — She: Just 
think of it! A few words mumbled by the 
minister .Mid people are married. He: Yes, 
and. by George, a few words mumbled' by 
a sleeping husband and people are divorced. 
— Boston Transcript. 



Santa Cruz 
California 



CASA DEL REY, 

THE MILLION DOLLAR FIREPROOF HOTEL 

The ideal spot for your summer outing with its warm beach bathing: dancing; 
good music: artistic, home-like, spacious lobby. 

This is a most wonderful place for children. Beautiful playgrounds; sanitary 
warm bathing pool; swimming instructors; saddle ponies for children. Special 
kitchenette where maid can prepare food for young children. 

Motor roads in fine condition via Sargents, Chittenden Pass and Watsonville, 
or the Coast Route via La Honda. The Southern Pacific offers special round trip, 
week-end rates as well as tickets good for several weeks. 

Cottage City, operated on the European plan, is also under the same manage- 
ment as Casa Del Rey. 

Correspondence regarding rates for families with maids and children solicited. 
Special rates by the week or for extended stays of a month or two. Address: 

CASA DEL REY, Santa Cruz, Calif. 

MORRIS & U ARNER. Prof 

Phone 600 



16 



San Francisco News Letter and 



PL/EASURE/S WAND 




California Entertainer at Orpheum 

Chester Fredericks has been in New York 
for a year and it has made a difference. The 
lad has grown in every way since his appear- 
ances at the Alcazar, which won him such 
wide popularity. Gus Edwards recognized 
his talent and captured him young, treated 
him kindly, told him many things. It is a 
joy to see the youngster dance. Edwards' 
"Song Revue of 1921" is an evening's enter- 
tainment by itself, and would fill the entire 
program sufficiently for the moderate Or- 
pheumite, but a generous management gives 
that and much more. Tom Wise, in his sec- 
ond week, is a great favorite, and the large 
bill is duly appreciated by the enthusiasiic 
eiudience. 



Versatility Is Keynote of Alcazar 

Truly, the Alcazar company can do any- 
thing! They can make almost acceptable a 
Frank Mandel farce-comedy called "My 
Lady Friends," and that is considerable 
achievement from the critic's point of view. 
The particular variety of fun concocted by 
Mr. Mandel has many admirers, but not on 
this pfge. So let us conTine our attention 
to the players and let the play stand. Dud- 
ley Ayres gives us a pleasant surprise by 
singing quite delightfully a harmless little 
thing entitled "I Want to Spread a Little 
Sunshine." with Florence Printy perched on 
the piano and joining him in the chcoius. 
Gladys George is sedately grown up and 
wifely, getting her innings in the last act to 
wear some pretty gowns. Anna MacNaugh- 
ton is genuinely funny as Hilda, the modern 
kitchen queen, and three newcomers, Eleanor 
Crittenden, Pearl Dunton and Minerva 
Ureka. play the "lady friends," according to 
the author's idea of ladies. Edna Conroy, 
a tall, striking looking young woman, does 
an excellent bit of acting as the quick-witted 
wife of the easy-going lawyer, who is 
Thomas Chatterton. Bert Chapman leaves 
us cold; a thoroughly nice lad, too, but truth 
to tell we miss Ben Erway sadly. Mr. Myers' 
orchestra is in its usual good form and the 
musical numbers played with much spirit add 
greatly to the evening's enjoyment. 



Columbia 

One of the mild amusements (it might be 
called a perquisite) connected with "Pleas- 
ure's Wand" is passing the time o' day with 
the handsome young men in the threatre box 
offices. One sorta misses it when they 
haven't a minute to say. "Hello, Miss News 
Letter; how are you this evening?" Now, 
there's that chap at the Columbia; he has 
been so busy for three weeks handling the 
never-ending crowds that come to see "Over 
the Hill" that he can't stop his ticket-selling 
long enough to pass out a smile and a kind 



"Obey no wand but pleasure's — Tom Moore. 

word to the "Wand." But what can one ex- 
pect when every man, woman and child in 
San Francisco is going to see the great 
human heart play, and our charming young 
man has to slip each one of 'em a ticket in 
record time? A case of efficiency swallow- 
ing up affability. 




California 

Betty Compson and Lon Chaney of "Mi- 
racle Man" fame, appear this week in a me- 
chanical contraption entitled "For Those We 
Love." Betty is pretty and we see plenty of 
her, but fail to get interested in the search 
for a plot. The attempt to please all is evi- 
dent in the choice of musical numbers. 



Imperial 

While we doubt Basil King's or Sir Oliver's 
acquiescence in the rash spiritualism of 
"Buried Treasure," none can condemn the 
picture for lack of action. Marion Davies 
puts considerable zest into her part and we 
grinned as her father, the usual Wall Street 
tyrant, tries to force her to marry the Duke. 



Strong Play at Alcazar Next Week 

"The Divorce Question," a big, vital, stir- 
ring dama with strongly drawn characters 
and carrying with it an important message 
will be presented at the Alcazar, beginning 
Sunday afternoon, July 31. This will be the 
first San Francisco production of this suc- 
cessful and powerful play. Dealing with an 
ever-present problem without gloves, the 
piece throbs with life and contains innum- 
erable climaxes and dramatic situations. 

The story deals with a man and wife who 
have become legally separated and the awful 
misfortunes that befall their son and daugh- 
ter through parental neglect. All come to a 
clergyman for counsel and advice and the 
sto-y revolves around his efforts to solve 
ther problems. 

Dudley Avres will have the exceedingly 
important characterization of the Rev. Wil- 
liam Jerome, rector of the Church of the 
Magdalene, and it will give him an unusual 
acting opportunity, as he is almost continu- 
ously on the stage. Gladys George will be 
the daughter of the divorced couple. 



Enough. I?n't It?— Mrs. Hogg: What have 
you ever done tn sa v e others from suffering 
?n^ miserv? Mr. Hogg: I married you, 
didn't I? — Chicago News. 



Deceived — "Helen married a rich old man. 
dWn't she? I nnderst?nd he had one foot 
in the grave." "That's what Helen thonqht. 
too; but he still continues to buv his shoes 
by the pair." — Boston Transcript. 



IMPROVING DEL MONTE GOLF COURSE 

A new tee is being considered for the thir- 
teenth hole on the historic Del Monte course. 
It will add some 30 to 40 yards to the dis- 
tance of the hole and will also be placed 
more to the left of the present tee. As the 
hole now stands, it has little to recommend 
it. When the change is made, however, it 
will make a big improvement for the Cali- 
fornia championships which come on Sep- 
tember 3d to I 1th. 



A FRIENDLY REMINDER 

Halsey E. Manwaring, manager of the 
Palace Hotel, this week sent to Roy Carruth- 
ers, former manager of the Palace Hotel and 
now manager of the Waldorf-Astoria, a re- 
minder of his days at the Palace Hotel. The 
reminder was in the form of a chair, greatly 
admired by Carruthers. 

The chair is of Louis the Fourteenth in 
design and is of solid oak. Carruthers is a 
great admirer of antique furniture and this 
particular chair was a pet of his while at the 
Palace Hotel. Manwaring had a silver plate 
inset in the chair. This plate reads: "To 
Roy — Reminding him of many pleasant 
hours at the Palace Hotel." The plate car- 
ries the signature of Manwaring. 



The latest admirer of American jazz music 
is Paderewski, the Polish premier, and one 
of the outstanding figures in the world war. 

"I like jazz music," said this world-re- 
nowned musician at the Palace Hotel last 
week. Continuing, Paderewski said: 

"I find jazz music very refreshing. It 
makes one want to dance. American has 
produced the finest dance music in the world 
and no better can be found anywhere than 
that played at the Palace Hotel. It is glori- 
ous. It makes you feel lively." 



SAd FRANCISCO 



THE tltST W w NA\)Dt<«l\.l£ 




\ 



MA Ii,?v EES 25 AND 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 
Except Sats., Suns, and Holidays 

AND THE SAME GREAT SHOWS 



Smoking permitted in dress circle and 
loges. 



California Advertiser for July 30, 1921 



17 



THE EVER-JOYOUS WHIRL 

Jack Joy's Orchestra, "Audacities of 
1921," and all the other novelties make the 
patrons of Cafe Marquard enjoy their spe- 
cial dinners with double zest. The special 
Italian dinner, with the choice of a selection 
a la carte, has been a greatly appreciated 
fecture of the gastronomic program, which 
is changed so often and with such knowl- 
edge of what the public desires that what is 
information today is ancient history tomor- 
row. 

One needs never have fear of the cuisine 
at Cafe Marquard. The specialties of the 
day are sure to meet the requirements of 
the most exacting gourmands, and if any 
extra is wanted, all you have to do is men- 
tion it. The chef at Cafe Marquard is a 
magician of the kitchen range, who can pro- 
duce miracles while other cooks are trying 
to think them out. "May his shadow never 
grow less," say all the bon vivants in town. 

Miss Nila Mac, Orpheum favorite, pre- 
sided as hostess on Wednesday, this being 
thertrical week. Next week the rollicking 
Revue will be continued with Walter Emer- 
son, Caprice Ardonne, Lavina Winn and the 
strikingly costumed chorus of pretty girls. 
Dancing always. 



H. C. OF L. IN BIBLE DAYS 

"I will do without haircuts." — Absalom. 

"I will make my own slings." — David. 

"Sion'er than pay house-rent, I will live 
on p boat." — Noah. 

"I will dance without slippers." — Salome. 

"I will buy no more wedding rings." — 
So'oTon. 

"Not even to express anger will I rend my 
garments." — Moses. 

"Writing mrterials being so costly, I will 
insc'be fewer ep'stles." — Paul. 

"To sa^e wear and tear. I will drive less 
fvri"us'v." — Jehu. 

"I wi'l exercise without clubs and dumb- 
be'U " — Samson. 

"We will do without clothes." — Adam and 
Eve. 

"We will abolish fuel from the ficv fur- 
n~re." — Shadrach. Meshach and Abednego. 
— Harold Seton in Life. 



A Corn'r in Cohn — Tie broke'. Isidor 
Cohll. was introducing his family of four In 
a business friend of his. "This is my wile " 
srid he. "and these are the consequences of 
our marriage." — Fliegende Blatter (Mun- 
ich). 



Snrpicious — "I'm afraid I must have made 
t mistake and given that waiter a larger tip 
than I intended to." 

"What makes you think so?" 
"He said. 'Thank you.' " — Life. 



A Time Exposure — A judge's little daugh- 
ter, who had attended her father's c~urt for 
the first time, was very much interested in th<- 
proceedings. After her return home she told 
her mother: 

"Papa made a speech, and several othei 
men made speeches to twelve men who sat 
all together, and then these twelve men were 
put in a dark room to be developed." — Pear- 
son's Weekly (London). 



Cattle in Spain- -This is a true story of an 
adventure of two lady artists in sunny Spain. 
They were walking, and arrived at a little 
country inn. hot, dusty and thirsty. They 
couldn't talk Spanish, but wanted some milk 
badly, so one of them drew a most beautiful 
high-arty cow, while the other jingled some 
coins. 

The Spaniards looked, and a boy was sent 
off post-hrste. 

In half an hour the boy returned, hot and 
triumphant — with two tickets for a bull-fight. 
— Town Topics (London). 



The One He Loved Best — An Atlanta hus- 
band, having offended, came home the even- 
ing of the quarrel with a parcel under his 
arm. 

"Darling," he said to his wife, "look here. 
I've got something here for the person I love 
best in all the world." 

S^e came forward with a shrug. 

"Hump! What is it?" she asked. "A box 
of cigars?" — Thermoid News. 



Gentlewomen — 

Jl trade that is of 

great importance: 

THE CARE OF THE HAIR 
THE CARE OF THE FACE 
THE CARE OF THE NAILS 

Hairdressing 
cJXCarceling 



Cc 



Hair St 



ore 



.osgroves nair 

Established 25 years 

360 Geary Street, San Francisco, Calif. 
Phone: KEARNY 3842 



^Berkeley Store: 2331 Telegraph Ave. 



Under Orders — Visitor (in early morning 
after week-end, to chauffeur) : Don't let 
me miss my train. 

Chauffeur: No danger, sir. Missus said 
if I did, it'd cost me my job. — Life. 



VI N O B A R! 

The Brick with the Kick 

Make Your Own It Is Simple 

Guaranteed not to ma^e Vinegar 

VINOBAR MFG. CO., San Francisco 

636-38 WASHINGTON STREET 
Agents Wanted 




'J-E-BaUery ^^ 
will need no attention 



Put a "J-E" in your car and forget it. 
It needs no water — no attention and 
is UNCONDITIONALLY GUARAN- 
TEED for 18 months — lasts longer 
than the ordinary liquid battery — - 
has more power and pep. 
Cut your battery cost one third with a 
"J-E." Fut one in your car today. — 
Then Forget It. 



SERVICE 

for all makes of 

STORAGE 
BATTERIES 

Bringyourbattery 
problems here* 



Storage Battery Dealer 

Telephone CITY Address 

C\ **^r» ^"" 

Usea. _ Tm C^ Battery 

Requires no Water 




18 




FANNY HURST'S METHOD 

Fannie Hurst has discovered, apparently, 
how to cut the Gordian knot of short story 
suiting and enjoy a vacation at the same 
time. She writes from her summer resort to 
the New York Times : 

"This promises to be a fine summer of 
out-of-doors, tennis, cross-country jaunts 
with my dogs, canoeing, much hammock 
reading — not named in order of importance 
—Work! 

"Of course, you wonder how. in the face 
of the above schedule, I am going to find 
time for the amount of writing I have 
mapped out for myself, now that I have fin- 
ished Star Dust.' 

"Listen. A little miracle! After all my 
years of six hours a dajy. seven days a week, 
three (sometimes even the four) weeks out 
of the month on a short story, I awoke one 
dav. and lo, there was light. 

"You see, back there in the dark ages, 
that is, up to three months ago, I used to 
work on an average of four weeks on a 
short story and play for one week. Now I 
work on an average of one week and play 
four! 

"Of course, not literally, because it prac- 
tically amounts to the same thing, but the 
di\ison of labor is different. 

"As always. I conceive my theme, charac- 
ters, p'ot. incidents, in tolo. before I begin 
to write, cnly now, instead of sitting me 
down to write as soon as the story has taken 
shape in my mind. I carry it about with me 
(on the aforementioned canoe journeys, 
etc.). letting it simmer and simmer up In 
the subconscious realms of the tireless cook- 
er. Occasionally, in the hammock or on 
the cross-country hike. I peek in, sticking a 
fork to test tenderness, and when the mate- 
rial is fairly ready to fall to pieces of done- 
ness out of the cooker with it and on to 
the stove of my typewriter. 

"It works like a charm. 

"I've written my last three stories by the 
fireless cooker method, and it is difficult even 
to conceive of the old days over the hot 
co? I range. 

"Yes, I feel exactly as I must sound. For 
all the world like one of the estatic ladies 
in the magazine advertisement. 'Why be 
a drudge? Try one of our Instantaneous 
Washing Machines. They rejuvenate.' 

"I completed a new short story yesterday. 
The actual writing of it consumed six days 
and I did my usual number of five rewrites. 
I've called it 'The Vertical City.' I rather 
think that my next volume will take its title 
from it. What do you think?" 



FOR DEVELOPING TALENT 

Gus Edwards, the celebrated author, pro- 
ducer and actor, who is at the Orpheum this 
week with his Re-Vue, has added to his 
many duties another line of endeavor which 
is distinctive in its scope. It is the establish- 
ment of a school, to be known as "The Gus 
Edwards School for Applied Arts." The pur- 
pose of the institution will be the develop- 
ment of stage talent in young men and 
women. Some of the greatest theatrical 
managers in New York will be associated 
with Mr. Edwards in this enterprise. The 
school will be located in New York and will 
be opened next year. 

There will be a department for every 
branch of theatrical art. 

SUNBEAMS 

Science of the Domestic Touch — Mrs. 
Green: My husband always makes a fuss 
when I ask him for a little money. Mrs. 
Wyse: Your system is all wrong, my dear. 
Tell him you need a lot of money and he'll 
feel tickled when he can put you off with a 
Title. — Boston Transcript. 



Perhaps — "Is there any value whatever 
behind our currency?" "Sure," said the 
prominent Bolshevist. "Eventually somebody 
will want it for waste paper, if properly 
baled." — Louisville Courier-Journal. 



What He Preferred — "And did you say 
you preferred charges against this man?" 
asked (he judge, looking over his gold- 
rimmed spectacles. "No, Your Honor." was 
the quick reply of the man to whom money 
was owed; "I prefer the cash!" — Yonkers 
Strtesman. 



Why No Other? — The small boy had been 
very obedient for a whole week "Mother," 
he said, "have I been a good boy lately?" 
"Yes, dear," answered his mother, "a very, 
very good boy." "And do you trust me?" 
he continued. "Why, yes." she replied, ' ot 
course mother trusts her little boy." Still 
the child was not satisfied. "I mean really, 
really trust me. mother." he explained. 
"Yes, I really, really trust you," said the 
mother. "Why do you ask?" "Well," he 
said solemnly, standing in front of her and 
looking her in the face, "if you trust me like 
you say you do. why do you go on hiding 
the jam?" 



BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old Poodle Dog 

Luncheon 75c 

Served Daily— 11 to 2 

Choose full-sized portions from large menu. 

which is changed every day. 

Excellent Food— Beautiful Environment 

Prompt Service 

French Dinner $1.50 

Including tax. week day* and Sundays, 5 to 9 P. M. 

DANCING 

421 BUSH ST.. ABOVE KEARNY 

Phone Douglas 2411 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

Gus' Fashion 

The MOST POPULAR RESTAURANT 

65 Post Street, Near Market Street. 
Phone Kearny 4536 San Francisco, Calif. 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 
French and Italian Dinners. 

FISH AND CAME A SPECIALTY 



For lhal stubborn cough 
Use Old Snake Doctor's Cough Remedy 

SNAKE DRUG CO. 

Formerly G. Leipnltz !( Co. 

Now Located at 

127-129 KEARNY ST. 



San Francisco Law School 

Third Floor Call Building 
Evening Sessions for Men & Women, 7:30 lo 9:30 

Applications for enrollmenl are rfing n>ct?ivri now 

Chi.-.'- rnnvnp Monday. Sept"tnt,rr u. t'.rji 
Writ.' TopAY for Catalogue 



PENIXSLLAR PATRONAGE SOLICITED 



POST-TAYLOR GARAGE, Inc. 

530 TAYLOR ST. 

Washing and Greasing Cars 
in a careful and efficient manner 



W. W. HEALEY 

NOTARY PUBLIC 

INSURANCE BROKER 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 



"The House of Quality" 
GOLDEN GATE DAIRY LUNCH 

Block 8t McDonald. Props. 

Service Supreme Home Cooking 

Prices Reasonable 

172 EDDY STREET 

Visit them after the snout and meal times 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 



Bank of New South Wales 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of Pro- 
prietors 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Aggregate Assets, 30th 
Sept. 1920 




$24,655,500.00 
16,750,000.00 

24.655,500.00 



$362,336,975.00 



SIR JOHN RUSSELL FRENCH, K. B. E., General Manager 

357 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian States, New Zealand, Fiji, Papua (New 
Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of Australasian Banking 
Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged. 

Head Office: London Office: 

GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET, E. C. 2 

Agents : 
Bank of California, National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bank, Crocker Nat'l Bank 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Member of the Federal Reserve System 

Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 2 1 si Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement and 7th Avenue 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

DECEMBER 31, 1920 

Assets $69,878,147.01 Capital Actually Paid Up $1,000,000.00 

Deposits 66,338,147.01 Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,540,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund. $343,536.85 

OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK, President 

GEO. TOURNY. Vice-Pres. and Manager A. H. R. SCHMIDT, Vice-Pres. and Cashier 

E. T. KRUSE, Vice-President A. H. MULLER, Secretary 

WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary 

WILLIAM HERRMANN. Assistant Cashier GEO. SCHAMMEL. Assistant Cashier 

G. A. BELCHER, Assistant Cashier R. A. LAUENSTEIN. Assistant Cashier 

C. W. HEYER, Manager Mission Branch W. C. HEYER. Manager Park-Presidio Dist. Branch 

O. F. PAULSEN, Manager Haight Street Branch 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

IOHN A. BUCK E. T. KRUSE I. N. WALTER A. HAAS 

GEO. TOURNY A. H. R. SCHMIDT HUGH COODFELLOW E. N. VAN BERGEN 

E. A. CHRISTENSON ROBERT DOLLAR L. S. SHERMAN 

COODFELLOW. EELLS. MOORE & ORRICK. General Attorneys 



BOND DEPARTMENT 

TH£ ANGLO AND LONDON PARIS 

NATIONAL BANK 



Su ter and Sansome Streets 
Phone Kearny 3500 
San Francisco. Cal. I. 



RECOMMENDS 

IRRIGATION DISTRICT BONDS 

FOR INVESTMENT 

THEY ARE more secure than first mortgages because they rank ahead of 
first morgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT. 

Yield from 6'- to 6M'' 
Let us send you our booklet THE IRRIGATION DISTRICT BOND 



THE CANADIAN BANK OF COMMERCE 

HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO. CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 Reseive Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 

STERLING EXCHANGE Bought. FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA and at LONDON. ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND. ORE.: SEATTLE. WASH : MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE. 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE. Manager W. 1. COULTHARD. Assistant Manager 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



Normandie Garage 

Gough and Sutter Sts. 



Washing and Polishing Day and Night. 

Cars Oiled and Greased. 

Crank Cases Drained Free. 

Home Garage Trade Solicited. 



Fillmore 4815 



Old Hampshire Bond 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

The Standard Paper for Business Stationery. 
"Made a little belter than seems necessary." The 
typewriter paper* are sold in attractive and durable 
boxes containing five hundred perfect sheets, plain 
or marginal ruled. The manuscript covers are sold 
in similar boxes containing one hundred sheets. 
Order through youi printer or stationer, or, if so de- 
sired we will send a sample book showing the entire 
line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 

37-45 FIRST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



BLANCO'S 

Farrell and Larkin Sts. 
Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without 

dining in the finest cafe in America 
Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner $1.75 



Dr. Byron VV. Haines 

DENTIST 

PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Office*— 505-507— 323 Geary Street 

Phone Douglas 2433 



New Prices On All 
Elgin Six Models 

Effective Monday, June 6, 1921 

Former Price New Price 

5-passenger Touring $1775 $1495 

4-passenger Scout 1 895 1 595 

5-passenger Sedan 2795 2395 

4-passenger Coupe 2795 2395 

2-passenger Roadster (New Model) 1595 

Prices f. o. b. Factory 

The New K-l Series Elgin Six, at the price at which it was so successfully introduced, represented 
the most remarkable automobile value ever offered in its price class. At these new low prices, this 
superb 1921 model, with all the features of appearance, performance and endurance, which have made 
the Elgin Six famous, offers to every motor car buyer a most exceptional opportunity. 

Note these 1 6 important improvements and refinements 
in the new K-l series 



New er.closed motor — dirt- and dust-proof. 
Improved cam shaft. 

Westinghouse starting motor and generator. 
New style mahogany dash board. 
Ad)ustable steering column support. 
Special Elgin design French side lamps. 
Leather hand pads on doors. 
Aluminum door sill pletes, etched with name. 
Aluminum escutcheon plates around levers, pedals, 
etc., in front compartment. 



10. New door-opening side curtains. 

11. Nickel-plated top moulding — front and rear. 

12. Nickel-plated curtain light frames. 

13. New style windshield wing nuts. 

14. Mahogany cowl board, with light, in tonneau of 

touring only. 

15. Trico windshield wiper. 

16. Improved paint system, with additional color coats 

and more durable finishing varnish. 



Come in and let us show you these beautiful new K-l Series Elgin Sixes. See for yourself what a really 

unusual opportunity they offer. 

MARK MOTOR CO. 

800 VAN NESS AVENUE 
TELEPHONE: PROSPECT 192 SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 




Six 



•AX- 




AND 

(Ealtfnmia AfltjertiBfr 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



SATURDAY, AUGUST 6, 1921 



$5.00 PER YEAR 




CORN ENDERS- 

the old sort — and the new 

CORNS USED TO BE TREATED BY FAKERS. BUT SCIENCE HAS FOUND 
A BETTER WAY TO TREAT CORNS, AND MILLIONS HAVE ADOPTED IT 

The modern way is Blue-jay liquid or plaster. A famous chemist perfected it. 
This great surgical dressing house prepares it. 

It is folly to pare corns or to treat them in unscientific ways. 

Blue-jay is applied by a touch. The corn pain ends instantly. Then the com is gently loosened. In a little 

while it' comes out— PROVE THIS TONIGHT. 



PLASTER OR LIQUID 

Blue -jay 

The Scientific Corn Ender 



BAUER & BLACK [ 



Makers of R i B Sterile Surgical' 

Drrnniif and Allied 

Product. 



CHICAGO 



NEW YORK 



TORONTO 



End Other Foot Troubles — 

To keep the fe*t in proper condition, bathe 
them with Blue-jay Foot Soap. It checks ex- 
cessive perspiration. It stops smarting and burning. 

Then use B!ue-jay Foot Relief, a soothing, 
cooling massage for aching muscles and tendon?. 

A final luxury is Blue-jay Foot Powder, an 
antiseptic, deodorant powder that keeps feet 
feeling fine. 



Th»»e new Blue-jar treats 
Each. 35c; cooabioaboa pkg. 



$1 00. 



■ 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 

Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of 
Proprietors 



Aggregate Assets, 30th 
September, 1920 




? 24,655.500.00 
16,750,000.00 

24.655,500.00 



$362,338,975.00 



SIR JOHN RUSSELL FRENCH, K. B. E., General Manager 

357 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian States, New Zealand, Fiji, Papua 

(New Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of Australasian 

Banking Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged 

Head Office London Office 

GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 29 THREADNEEDLE STREET, E. C. 2 

Agents: 
Bank of California, National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bank, Crocker Nat'l Bank 



Member Federal Reserve System and Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS 526 California Street, San Francisco, Calif. COMMERCIAL 

Mission Branch, Mission and 21st Streets 

Park. Presidio District Branch, Clement St. and Tth Ave. 

Halght Street Branch, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30th, 1921 

Assets $ 71,383,431.14 Capital Actually Paid Up...- $1,000,000.00 

Deposits 67,792,431.14 Reserve and Conting't F'ds 2,591,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund „ $357,157.85 

OFFICERS 
JOHN A. BUCK, President; GEO. TOURNY. Vice-Pies, and Manager; A. H. R. SCHMIDT, 
Vice-Pres. and Cashier: E. T. KRUSE. Vice-President: A. H. MULLER, Secretary; WM. 
D. NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary; WILLIAM HERRMANN, GEO. SCHAMMEL, G. A. 
BELCHER, R. A. LAUENSTEIN, Assistant Cashiers; C. W. HEYER, Manager Mission 
Branch; W. C. HEYER, Manager Park-Presidio District Branch; O. F. PAULSEN, Manager 
Haight Street Branch. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
JOHN A. BUCK, GEO. TOURNY, E. T. KRUSE, A. H. R. SCHMIDT, I. N. WALTER, 
HUGH GOODFELLOW. A. HAAS. E. N. VAN BERGEN, ROBERT DOLLAR, E. A. 
CHRISTENSON, L. S. SHERMAN; GOODFELLOW. EELLS, MOORE & ORRICK, General 
Attorneys. 



BOND DEPARTMENT 

THE ANGLO AND LONDON-PARIS 

NATIONAL BANK 



Sutter and Sansome Streets 

Phone Kearny 5600 
San Francisco, Calif. 



RECOMMENDS 

Irrigation District Bonds 

FOR IATESTMENT 

THEY ARE more secure than first mortgages because they rank ahead of 
first mortgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT 

Yield from 6% to 6%% 

Let us send you our booklet THE IRRIGRATION DISTRICT BOND 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 
485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG j NEW YORK- 
PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 
San Francisco Office: 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 



San Francisco Law School 

Third Floor Call Building 
Evening Sessions for Men and Women, 
7:30 to 9:30 
Applications for enrollment are being re- 
ceived now. Classes convene Mondav, 
September 12, 1921 
Write Today for Catalog 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 

Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

i ipposlte Halace Hot* 

Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



Normandie Garage 

Gough and Sutter Streets 

Washing and Polishing Day and Night 

Cars Oiled and Greased 

Crank Cases Drained Free 

Home Garage Trade Solicited 



Phone Fillmore 4815 



Old Hampshire Bond 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

The Standard Paper for Business Stationery. 
••Made a little better than seems necessary." 
The typewriter papers are sold in attractive 
and durable boxes containing five hundred 
perfect sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The 
manuscript covers are sold in similar boxes 
containing one hundred sheets. Order 
through your printer or stationer, or, if so 
desired, we will send a sample book showing 
the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 

37-45 First Street San Francisco 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city without 

dining in the finest cafe in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) . 75c 
Dinner $1.75 



Dr. 


Byron W. 

DENTIST 


Haines 


PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 


Offices 


505-507 323 


Geary St. 




Phone Douglas 


2433 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 185C 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




VOL. XCIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, AUGUST 6, 1921 



No. 32 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building, Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco, Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif., Post Office as second-class mail matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year $5.00. Foreign, One 
year. $6.00: Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter dues not solieit fiction and will not be 
responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 



Two more killed Sunday by an automobile smash. 

Tis' a dull Sabbath the coroner doesn't get a ring up. 

* * * 

When will the masses learn that every raise of taxes 

ultimately hits their small salaries by raise of rents. 

* * * 

When do we begin on that new city Charter which will 

clean the barnacles out of the City Hall and lower taxes? 

* * * 

A high police official from India declares our police 

system is all wrong. What lunatic ever said it was right? 

*3* •** *r 

When will the Volsteaders begin to burst into private 

homes anil snatch the social glasses out of the dinner-guests 
hands? + + + 

Those sporting scribes, still crazy on the Carpentier 

fight, should l>e taken to the Emergency Hospital to have 
their heads examined. 

* * * 

How many learned professors would like to exchange 

their coffee and doughnut salaries for the municipal pay 
of our street sweepers. 

* * + 

Why not stop printing endless exposures of war-ma- 
terial steals? Save some space for the local profiteers 
robbing the housewives. 

* * + 

Six dollars a day for the derelicts that sweep our 

streets. What hope 'is there for San Francisco with a City 
Hall run on Closed Shop methods? 

* ♦ + 

The Oakland Bridge project seems to slumber, but the 

other and really necessary project of improved electric ser- 
vice to San Mateo, is agitating the public. 

* + * 

Fine publicity work by those French press agents for 

wicked Deauville "Shocking". '•Scandalous". "Babylon beat- 
en miles" The American liners can't furnish accommoda- 
tions for tourists to Deauville. 



Last year was the worst on record for the hide and 

skin trade, but the shoe profiteers got in their deadly work 
on the public. A , . 

It doesn't make any difference to Andy Gallagher 

whether the Open Shop wins or not. He is to be the Sinn 
Fein Plenipotentiary to Yap. 



All the large cities on the Pacific Coast are watching 

the progress of the fight for the Open Shop and the scat- 
tering of the business agents of the Closed Shop. 



Before starting a bridge to Oakland we should, spend a 

few dollars to make our splendid natural ocean beach less 
like the wild shore on which Robinson Crusoe was wrecked. 



"Treat-em-rough I" appears to be the new slogan of 

the Prohibition enforcers, snatching glasses out of guest's 
hands in restaurants. What a patient people we Americans 



After some of our business men have been boosting 

P. H. McCarthy fur years as the logical successor of Rolph 
they can hardly expect to pull him off his political perch in 
five minutes. ♦ ♦ ♦ 

"General intelligence" is what Thomas A. Edison wants 

in his factory and can't get. Naturally not. General stu- 
pidity approximating to asininity is what Congress gets at 
large salaries. + * * 

The Southern Pacific Company is awake to the fact. 

that, if it does not improve the transportation to San Mateo 
County, the motor rivals will cut heavier than ever into 
their business. + + + 

"This is no time to raise wages", cries the Chronicle. 

but the Supervisors chuckle and go on lifting the scale. 
Get a new Charter and heave them all out. Elect Super- 
visors by wards ! + + + 

It is suggested that the Civic League of Improvement 

Club get donations, so they can investigate the City Hall. 
What has the League ever done to inspire sufficient confi- 
dence to trust them with a bag of peanuts ? 

+ * + 

The King Tax Bill will give Governor Stephens nearly 

twelve millions more than he had to spend last year. He 
failed by nearly three million- within his last state 

appropriation. ' And yet he is going to run once more. 
Either run or walk. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 




i i ' i i i r ill i i. i i .1 n i ■ 



The American public 
Lloyd George-Repaying Northcliffe has not fully grasped 

the significance of the 
quarrel between Lloyd George and Northcliffe. Although 
George has reached the Premiership in the scramble of 
politics, his countrymen are unable to tell what he really 
and conscientiously stands for, except the advancement of 
Lloyd George. He began as a Liberal and has been all 
things to all men until nothing more is expected of him by 
most independent Britishers, but to set their Ship of State 
on an even keel. That he appears to be accomplishing, by 
surmounting obstacles that would have stopped most men. 
What Northcliffe and his journalism mean to most in- 
telligent Englishmen can be easily learned, by the asking 
in any part of Britain. He is the Hearst of England, except 
that he began penniless, whereas our own Prince of the 
Yellow Press started with a paternal fortune of something 
like fifteen millions, it is said. With all his sensational 
publications to aid him, Northcliffe was able to cast Asquith 
out of the British Premiership and placed in power Lloyd 
George, the chief aid of Asquith, whom he excelled in every- 
thing that goes to make a clever and successful politician. 
Although disloyalty to the chief, was included in George's 
overthrow of Asquith, the British gained by the change. 
Asquith never was and never could be a great parliamen- 
tary success. Lloyd George, so far, has weathered every 
political squall. . . . 

Having helped promote George, the English Heart 
desired that the beneficiary of his influence should repay the 
debt. That is a dominant characteristic of the type. They 
first thrust greatness on a politician and then insist that he 
shall become the tail of some journalistic kite. Should he 
refuse the yellow furies are turned loose, and he is torn 
into ribbons. 

But George has not suffered the customary fate of small 
politicians, for he is anything but small. He is a politician 
of amazing dexterity and intuition. As a political card 
player he can deal from either end of the pack and never 
fail to give himself a full hand. 



The miners strike which was really camouflaged revo- 
lution and Bolshevism, seemed to give Northcliffe the op- 
portunity to pulverize the detested Premier. Then too, 
there was the odious Irish affair with its military horrors 
exciting the opposition of millions of honest Englishmen. 
Northcliffe chuckled in his sleeve, when he saw George in 
the horns of the dilemma with the miners' revolution 
ready to impale him on one side and the Sinn Fein horn 
near his breast on the other side. The moment had arrived 
for shelving George with Asquith. 

But the English Hearst overplayed his hand. His attack 
on the Premier aroused English resentment instead of 
applause. The people rose almost as one man and con- 
demned what they regarded as an outrage. Newspapers 
that had no love for George took his side. Northcliffe had 
made one of the great mistakes of his career. Fate too, play- 
ed the publisher a scurvy trick. Scarcely was the ink dry on 
the unpopular denunciation of George when things began 
to come his way. The miners, betrayed by their threach- 
erous leaders, hauled down their colors and returned to 
work. De Valera led by General Jan Smuts of South 
Africa held a confidential conference with the British Pre- 
mier in London. Greatest luck of all, our wise administra- 
tion at Washington opened the way for a world agreement 
on limitation of armaments and peace which would mean 




lower taxes. George suddenly obtained a popularity he 
had not enjoyed for years. Every shout for him carried 
an implied condemnation for the publisher who had so 
bitterly attacked him. Nothing is more dangerous than 
to assail a politician in his hour of triumph. 

* * * 

Northcliffe stopped his fierce war on George and thought 
it advisable, to make a trip for his health, which his medical 
adviser had recommended. No man's health could with- 
stand the strain of the publisher's strenuous life. He has 
twice been in a dangerous condition but rugged physique 
bore him through the ordeal. So he has come to America 
and Washington dispatches tellhowtheBritishEmbassy has 
snubbed him. That seems to most Americans a small piece 
of business — the recalling of plans to hold a dinner in 
honor of the celebrated London publisher. 

But back of the snub is the fact that Northcliffe desired 
to be one of the British representatives at the November 
conference to discuss limitations of armaments and other 
great questions affecting the nations on the Pacific. Lloyd 
George has signified his desire to attend the conference and 
the Northcliffe newspapers have condemned the notion as 
impossible. "Does Northcliffe desire to represent 
the Empire at the conference?" has demanded the Man- 
chester Guardian, one of the most influential newspapers 
in England. "Is his choice Lord Northcliffe himself?" 
Undoubtedly it is , and in that fact we discover the animus 
of the British Embassy snub to the publisher and detect 
the fine political hand of the British Premier brushing 
the Prince of Yellow Journalists out of his way. 

As Northcliffe was ostensibly on a private trip for his 
health, the British Embassy was no more obligated to 
dine him, officially, than if he were an ordinary manufact- 
urer on a business trip. Especially was the embassy not 
likely to give eclat to Northcliffe's tour of America, Can- 
ada and the Far East, after he had been condemned in the 
House of Commons for misrepresenting the king of Eng- 
land in a newspaper statement. To embarrass the king, 
by fake news, is an unforgivable sin in Great Britain, and 
when the misrepresented monarch takes the trouble to 
resent the fake a guilty publisher is sure of a bad month 
or two. Very conservative are the Britishers in their 
notions of what deference belongs to the throne. Soap-box 
orators may shout openly in Hyde Park that monarchies 
should be abolished and the listening policeman pays no 
more attention than if a sparrow were twittering. That 
kind of talk is mere abstract twaddle — metaphorically 
molasses to catch flies. But let a responsible citizen publish 
a statement of fact which impugns the king's motives, 
and woe betide him if he be a liar. 



The king has, in effect, called the Northcliffe papers 
liars. The delighted Premier has brought the fact to the 
notice of the House of Commons, the British Embassy has 
snubbed the publisher of the discredited journal ; it is 
easy to see what a swell chance Northcliffe has of repre- 
senting the British Empire at the Washington conference 
in November. 

More than that the celebrated London publisher has been 
robbed of all the mystic interest which his tour had created. 
People had asked themselves, whom did he represent in 
his perigrination of the globe. Many thought there was 
some secret connection between him and the British Im- 
perial Government, but now the world sees him stripped of 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR AUGUST 6, 1921 



the gaudy feathers of imagination, standing in the plain 
garb of a newspaper publisher persona non grata with his 
king and at war with his Premier. In his tour of the globe 
those facts will precede him and rob his voyage of the 
glitter and pomp of an ambassadorial progress. 

It is a serous affair to lock horns with the Premier of 
a great empire unless one be sure his footing is very firm. 
Lord Northcliffe has had his hours of elation in smashing 
British politicians. Lloyd George has his satisfaction now 
in pricking gas-balloons of yellow journalism. 



Our esteemed contemporary the 
Wake up San Francisco Chronicle is in error about the 
"wonderful development" west of 
Twin Peaks. It appears to us, and many citizens, that the 
dominant feature of that district is its lamentable stagna- 
tion. Sunset, suggests the sleep of Rip Van Winkle. It 
is a pitiable example of the paralysis of San Francisco by 
protracted misgovernment and lack of vision. 

It is true, that the 'neighborhood of the tunnel mouth, 
west of Twin Peaks, private enterprise has created a small 
but fine residence neighborhood out of the primal-sand 
hills, but there the signs of civic improvement stop. 

Vastly different are the symptoms of progress in the 
Richmond District, on the north of the Golden Gate Park, 
owing to the better car service. It may be that the Muni- 
cipal lines are costing the taxpayers a great deal of money, 
but the rapid transportation has changed a region of deso- 
late dunes into one of many small homes. Of expensive 
substantial buildings there are few. Still, Richmond is a 
vast improvement on the neglected Sunset, where in twenty 
years there has not been erected as many homes as should 
have been in five years. It is full twenty years since the 
construction of better class residences began at Ingleside, 
but there has been little more than a beginning. A city 
cannot grow under such conditions as the people of San 
Francisco have tolerated for a quarter of a century. If 
one should desire a standard of comparison in civic exten- 
sion let him look at Los Angeles, where the erection of 
homes is continuous and not spasmodic industry. Los 
Angeles, besides having the Open Shop. American system, 
has had a most admirable car service. What have we had? 
Municipal war on our private car company, until it was 
driven into practical bankruptcy. In no civilized city in 
the world has there been such a disgraceful conspiracy to 
destroy a private corporation. Where in the wide 
world has there been such a disgraceful conspiracy to des- 
troy a private corporation, so that small politicians might 
make themselves more votes. Where in the wide world can 
one find such an atrocity on a main street, as the four-car 
tracks on our Market street. A magnificent throughfare 
has been ruined in order to oust a private service, and the 
owners of a franchise have been deliberately robbed. Upon 
the many private citizens who bought the bonds and stocks 
of the injured private corporation, has fallen the loss, en- 
tailed by the dishonest competition of the municipal lines. 

When one sees what the political line on Geary street 
extravagantly managed though it be. has done for the 
district through which -it passes, the possibilities of all 
suburbs of San Francisco, under efficient car service be- 
come apparent. 

The Haight street line creeping over high hills toward 
the Sunset district destroys the possibilities of the latter. 
There must be some better way of reaching the suburb or 
twenty more years will pass, and it will still be an exhibit 
of barren sand hills, with here and there an oasis of small 
homes. 

To make the Sunset district what it should 1 e there 
should be a branch tunnel under Twin Teaks earn ing pas- 
sengers rapidly from down-town to the Haight and Ash- 
bury neighborhood, whence they could be trans] rted with 
speed even to the ocean beach. 

What would that cost ? Only a fraction i t what our 



inefficient politicians in the Board of Supervisors waste in 
six months. Wake up San Francisco ! Come out of your 
coma, now that the Open Shop has come! You have let 
yourself become the second city, in population in California. 
Don't become any worse. Start agitation for a new Char- 
ter to reduce the army of political parasites and bring down 
the taxes that are eating us up. We all contribute to the 
load of taxation. 

Henry Ford has a talent for 
Ford's Genius for Efficiency, surprising people. He is 

original in his methods. He 
certainly surprised the world when he sent a ship load of 
pacificists to Europe to stop the war. That was a wonder- 
ful conception. Some penny-a-liners on the yellow press, 
have sneered at Mr. Ford's original method of preventing 
human slaughter. But what did the yellow press do to stop 
it ? What did anybody do that had more practical value 
than Mr. Ford's ship-load of idealists ? The American 
manufacturer had at least the satisfaction of knowing that 
he had attempted something on a large scale to stop a 
monstrous crime against humanity. He did not succeed, 
because it was not on the cards for him to succeed. But 
stranger things are happening, than that Ford's deputa- 
tion of idealists might have caused a halt in a great war. 
Such an occurrance would not have been stranger than the 
appearance of General Jan Smuts as peacemaker in the 
Irish revolution. Years ago he was the leader in a bitter 
war with the British. Now he leads the president of an 
Irish republic to a peace conference with Lloyd George, and 
civil war has stopped in Ireland for the time being. That 
is as strange an occurence as if the Ford Peace Delegation 
had lead the statesmen of France and Germany into a sober 
train of thought, and caused them to think of the awful 
consequence of looking before they leaped into the jaws 
of hell. 

In a strange way Henry Ford's idealistic move to avert 
a world war had an important effect. It suddenly and com- 
pletely, removed from public view a band of reformers who 
were bent on reconstruction of the world on new lines. 
Never before had so many philosophers full of altruistic 
theories been brought together for a single purpose of 
philanthropy. They proved incapable of reconciling their 
theories, and harmoniously co-operating in the furtherance 
of one great scheme. Most of them lost their reputation 
and have passed out of public sight never to return. The 
world is the better for their return to obscurity. They were 
given a glorious chance to figure big in the large affairs 
of life, but they proved themselves only small people ani- 
mated by their enormous egotism. 

Hardly a man amongst the noted reformers whom 
Henry Ford selected on account of their celebrity but 
proved he was a counterfeit. Indirectly, therefore, the 
money which financed the Ford Peace Delegation was well 
spent. It cleared the stage of a lot of useless junk. 

Henry Ford is now figuring in finance, as prominently 
as he did in philanthropy before the world war, but with 
better results to his wealth. lie has triumphantly weath- 
ered the awful hurricane which swept out of a clear sky, 
and left many wrecks on the shores of the motor world. 
The bankers of New York are candidly astonished by Mr.. 
Ford's feat and are loud in their praise of his energy 
and foresight, when the greatest intelligence and courage 
were needed. 

When the buying capacity of the United States was 
suddenlv paralyzed, six months ago. Henrv Ford owed the 
Government $55,000,000 for taxes. He owed $30,000,000 
in notes, originally issued to buy out his minority stock- 
holders. That financial condition would have meant noth- 
ing, if the market for Ford cars were as active as usual. 
But there was a market for nothing — cars, or clothes, or 
diamonds, or anything. Big metropolitan bankers offered 
Mr. Ford $75,000,000 in cash, to tide him over the panic, but 
they wished to stipulate that a loan carried with it the 
authority for the lenders to tak< part of the management 
of the Ford concern in their hands. What did the man- 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



ufacturer do? He handed the money lenders their hats 
and went right ahead, like Admiral Farragut when told at 
the storming of the forts of New Orleans that torpedoes 
threatened, "Damn the torpedoes.!" shouted the gallant 
American amidst the roar of cannon and the shrieking of 
shell, "Go straight ahead I" 

Mr. Ford went straight ahead. He did not borrow a 
dollar. He loaded his unsold cars on the trains and sent 
them all over America with orders to his agents to take 
and sell them. No agent desires to lose the sale of Henry 
Ford's merchandise. Scarcely a Ford dealer of the 17,000 
in the United States who did not instantly accept the 
factory draft for the cars sent out. The tide of ready cash 
floating toward the Ford exchequer became a flood. The 
manufacturer cut the prices and almost overnight the 
buying was renewed. The corporation's cash on June 1 
was $36,000,000 and there were no outstanding obligations 
except current merchandise acceptances. 

Mr. Ford's Napoleonic energy and decision has con- 
vinced the bankers that the famous manufacturer is a 
genius at organization and efficiency. In placing his great 
business on a sound basis in the midst of a tremendous 
financial depression he has not only achieved a personal 
triumph but done an inestimable service to the whole motor 
industry. 

The impending collapse of 
The Skies Are Clearing Bolshevism in Russia pre- 
sages better times for the 
whole world. Although communism is a colossal fallacy, 
which has many times been exposed, humanity is always 
afraid of its consequences, when conducted on a large scale. 
The only difference between Bolshevism in Russia and 
many other instances of its insane methods, is the largeness 
of the stage of operations. But the collapse must be as 
certain in Russia as elsewhere. Communism is an error 
which develops its own destruction. It has never worked, 
and it never can, for invariably it is based on impracticable 
theories and enforced by ruthless tyranies, at which man- 
kind revolts. In the end communistic leaders are always 
killed like rats by their tyrannized followers. It was so 
in Paris, when the leaders were driven into the church of 
the Madeline, and slaughtered on the altar where they had 
tried to find refuge. 

Other nations have been palsied by fear that the exam- 
ple of Russia would set all Europe and America on fire. 
The opposite is the effect. The example of Russia has 
saved the rest of Europe. 

In the United States we have had, under cover, a 
large mass of Reds, who hoped for a great social upheaval 
and robbery of private property. Most of these Reds are 
from southern Europe and Russia, and the knowledge of 
their existence has discouraged many Americans from in- 
vesting in homes. That, however, is passing and will dis- 
appear entirely, when we have, the Open Shop in full 
operation and the revolutionary army of Organized Labor 
will break up. 

The British miners who expected to see Bolshevism 
sweep Europe, have given up that idea and gone back to 
work. The English coal strike is over, the wage question 
in the cotton industry has been settled with a reduction. The 
engineering trades have voted to accept reduced wages, the 
railway employes are working under a sliding scale 
arrangement by which wages fall with the cost of living, 
and the English situation is peaceful. The same tendency 
is seen in France, Italy and over the Continent generally. 

The situation in France is good. The fields throughout 
the devastated region are restored and so are the railroads, 
canals and highways. The industries are restored to more 
than fifty per cent of their pre-war capacity. 

The Irish civil war is in a fair way to be stopped and 
the Irish question taken out of American politics. In the 
United States everything is proceeding better than might 
have been expected thanks to the admirable administration 
at Washington where a patriotic and wise President is 



aided by a splendid American in the office of State Secre- 
tary. 

It appears to be only a question of a little time until 
Mexico will regain her commercial importance under Amer- 
ican recognition. 

The conference of the great powers of Europe with 
America and Japan relative to reduction of Armament and 
better international relations affords the greatest hope of 
all that we are about to enter an era of beneficial peace 
which will restore prosperity to the harrassed and burdened 
peoples. 

All things considered the clearing skies presage a 
period of exemption from ruinous storms. 



The Prohibition enforcers in 
How Far Will They Go? San Francisco have invaded 

some restaurants, one of which 
is patronized by people of the best class. Glasses have been 
snatched out of the hands of guests. How far will this 
invasion of personal liberties be carfied? 

Between raids on restaurants of the better class and 
intrusion in private homes, there is little difference in the 
exercise of govermental tyranny. Prohibition officers who 
burst into a well conducted restaurant at the dinner hour, 
and snatch glasses from guests would hardly hesitate to 
force their way into a private home and commit similar 
offenses. The Prohibition enforcer, as brought into action 
by the Volstead Act, is a logical successor to the Carrie Na- 
tion crusaders, smashing glasses in saloons, slashing bars 
with axes and emptying bottles and barrels into the gutters. 
The spirit of Lynch Law is exemplified by both types. En- 
forcement of laws restrictive of personal liberty, cannot be 
accomplished in any other way than by tyrannical violence. 
The principle of Prohibition is radically wrong and nothing 
can make it right. 

Least of all should it be expected, that the class of men 
who hire themselves to the government for enforcement 
of a fanatical law, would perform their work with any at- 
tempt at decency. Their duty is to be indecnt and offen- 
sive, so as to inspire terror. Knowing how they are regard- 
ed by all decent citizens, they no compunctions about 
obeying the letter their tyrannical instructions. 
* * * 

All over the world the cost of gov- 
Cost- of. Government eminent has reached a stage where 
the people are groaning more or less 
Little attention is given to the fact that there is 
a murmur among the people and that this murmur may very 
easily change into a growl. President Harding has heard 
the murmur and he has made a step in the right direcction 
in the appointment of General Dawes as Director of the 
Budget. If the nations of the world attending the parley. 
to be held on the call of the President, among other things 
adopt measures tending toward reducing the terrible costs 
of armament and this action is taken in connection with 
the budget reductions in this country we will experience 
a great relief. It is not only in a Federal sense however 
that reductions in governmental expenses are necessary 
but in the expenses of states, couaties and cities and towns. 
California is heavily burdened now with bonded debts of 
all kinds and the current expenses of the state, the cities 
and towns and the counties might be cut in many di- 
rections. There is occasional duplication of officials and 
overlapping of effort and this should be done away with. 
There should be an effort made to pledge every official 
running for office to a reduction of expenses and if the re- 
duction does not come after election the official should be 
removed or remembered for eviction at the next election. 
There is entirely too much promises and not enough of 
performance on the part of the people's servants. A gen- 
eral campaign for the reduction of governmental expendi- 
ture all over the country is imminent. And we have a case 
in point right here in San Francisco when we see very 
foolish moves on the part of the Supervisors. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR AUGUST 6, 1921 




OUR MARVELOUS DOCTORS. 

ANOTHER astounding story with a medical flavor! 
We have had lots of them lately in San Francisco. But 
at last one has appeared in print which will make the 
wise ones of science sit up and rub their eyes. 

An Englishman sick almost to death, has sent repeated 
cablegrams to our Dr. Max Rothchild, to cross the con- 
tinent and the ocean and make him well. What of all the 
medicos in Britain with its population of forty million souls 
— or what passes for souls? So crowded is the medical 
profession in England that a workingman can enjoy the 
luxury of calling in the family physician for fifty cents. 
That of course is in the poorer part of London. 
***** 

Up the West End way, the usual order of medical 
ethics prevails. When some fat merchant rings up for first 
aid for the gout, the honored pill artist promptly looks up 
the latest edition of "Whos Who" and Bradstrect's quarter- 
ly report on millionaires. "Ah ha! — Sir John Gotrox — 
Splurge House. Grosvernor Square — Believe me things 
are going to happen to Sir John's bank roll." 

Filled with those benevolent intentions the fashionable 
sawbones orders his chauffeur to head for Grosvernor 
Square and next day the London Times on its front page 
prints in leaded type the lamentable announcement that 
Sir John Gotrox, the pride of British commercialism, is on 
the flat of his back with appendicitis. Two days later the 
more lamentable news, on the front page of the limes, 
relates that the operation was an emphatic success but alas 
Sir John has croaked. ***** 

Yes! The medical Britisher knows every inch of the 
road to the patient's pocket-book. lie can feel the pulse of 
a lumber heaver for fifty cents, or cut out the vermiform 
of a noble knight of commerce, for a sum like a donation 
by Woodrow Wilson to abunch of whiskered Bolshevists in 
Moscow. ***** 

But with all the doctors who are stepping on cue an- 
other's feet in Britain, the eminent but mysterious patient 
has to cable, anil doubly cable, to our own Doctor Max 
Rothschild to hurry to his bed of pain and relieve him. 
This is indeed a local triumph worthy to resound from San 
Diego to the shimmering summits of the Sierras. Were it 
not that we have received so many jolts, in rendering local 
talent premature ovations, we should suggest a speech from 
the Mayor to the Supervisors, and a special holiday for the 
public schools. ***** 

The most wonderful thing in connection with this call 
from England to Dr. Max Rothschild, is the mystery of the 
patient's identity. Beyond the fact that his name is "Rob- 
erts", and that he is supposed to be related to the family of 
the once famous Marshal of England, nothing is known, 
except that he has agreed to the telegraphed fee of Dr. Max 
the modest figure of $25,000. A man with that much cash 
in London these days must have a regiment of special 
detectives around him. 

***** 

Perhaps the whole storj of the identity of Dr. Max's 
mysterious patient has not been revealed. It may be that 
the wild call to San San Francisco talent is really 
command. Perhaps England's king himself is prt : ped up 
with pillows at St. lames Palace and lackeys maybe scur- 
rying around and handing the siek monarch teli 'one di- 
rectories and medial registries. But none of tl volumes 

contains what the patient seeks. 'No! no I, hi petulantly 
ims, "wire for Or. Max Rothschild of San ': rancisco !" 



And as the wireless on the roof of the Palace begins to 
crackle like a Chinese New- Near festival, His Majesty sinks 
into Ins pillows in satisfaction, and a smile of confidence 
overspreads his countenance. Who knows? Let us wait, 
impatiently though it may be. 

***** 

Heaven defend us from a disillusion such as we suffered 
over the wonderful machine of our Dr. Abrams, which could 
determine parentage by a blood test. Many an unfaithful 
spouse shook in her short skirt. Many suspicions pater- 
familias smiled grimly, and vowed to submit a drop of his 
own blood and his progeny's to the Abrams machine. A 
few whirls of the contraption by the talented inventor and 
the genealogy of a family would be as accurately fixed, as 
if printed in the Almanaeh De Gotha. 

But alas the French savants sneer at claims of Dr. 
Abrams and the Italians — always an outspoken bunch — cry 
"assininity !" The Germans say — but it doen't matter what 
Germans say now. ***** 

Worst of all is the local cloud which has been cast on 
Dr. Abrams' scientific claims by Dr. C. F. Buckley, the 
dean of learned and experienced physicians who perfected 
his knowledge in many lands. He vows that Abrams' ma- 
chine couldn't differentiate the blood of a flounder and a 
"hot-dog." He knows because he tested the matter. 
***** 

We trust that Dr. Max Rothschild will come back from 
London with laurels wreathing his brow, and the $25,000 
plunks of his mysterious client in his grip. Meantime would 
it not be a good idea to protect doctors from flaring pub- 
licity which suggests a press agent's trying to menace the 
fame and salary of a movie actress. All doctors detest 
publicity — especially free advertising. Though none of 
them has ever been killed by the shock of getting into print 
without their knowledge or intention. Still it may happen. 
Go slow brethren of the daily press and wait till Dr. Max 
gets back before hitting up the loud caliope. 




secret of coffee - 
roastintf "produces 
ihe wondrous flavor 

GTswelTs 

^^NAIIONAl CREST 

(offee 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Bootleggers Paradise 

By HARVEY BROUGHAM 



AMERICA is now the Bootleggers Paradise," declares 
James Barnes on the opening page of the editorial 
section of the New York World of July 24, having 
returned to New York journalism after a tour which took 
him into various parts of The West and South. In its 
editorial introduction of Mr. Barnes to its readers, the 
World describes him as "an author, traveler and observer 
of men and their motives and a firm believer in temper- 
ance." 

This versatile newspaper man does not regard Pro- 
hibition on the Volstead plan, as temperance. To him, it 
seems a very reprehensible sort of intemperance. Mr. 
Barnes is far from being alone in that view. Before the 
Volsteaders put over their sumptuary legislation. America 
was comparatively a temperate nation. Everything in this 
world is relative. ,5. 4, .5, 

Much whiskey and beer and other intoxicating bever- 
ages were imbibed every year in the United States it is 
true, but how did the American record of drinking compare 
with that of old and highly civilized countries of Europe? 
Compartively we drank less, and what is more significant, 
our annual consumption of strong drink was growing 
smaller. In other words we were advancing in practical 
temperance. The fashion no longer was to get drunk in 
saloons, and go reeling through the streets. Saloon drink- 
ing had already become tabu with representative men in 
the professions and in commerce. Private clubs were rap- 
idly displacing the public drinking places. No doubt many 
prosperous and successful business men were accustomed 
to taking their cocktails in their clubs, prior to going home 
in perfect sobriety to their dinners. But compare that 
modern fashion with the general habit of the gentry of a 
century ago, who gorged themselves with food and swamp- 
ed themselves with wine and brandy. 

It was no lasting social disgrace for a gentleman to scoff 
his wine until he fell under the table. Read the English 
novelists of the eighteenth century on hard drinking gentry 
and nobility whose capacity exceeded three bottles of port, 
and whose after dinner recreations included beating the 
night watchman who patrolled the cities, carrying lanterns 
and long staves to subdue roysterers. They were wild 
blades in those days of Anglo-Saxon civilization, whose 
delight was to see bull-baiting and prize fighting with bare 
fists. They fought duels in the suburbs of London and did 
many things they should have left undone, so that they 
would not suffer gout in their old age and pass to their 
forefathers full of regrets for their misconduct. 
* * * 

Still those wild fox-hunting squires and patrons of 
prize-fighting, were a social improvement on their ances- 
tors, to whom boozing and feudal belligerence were inde- 
spensible. If a gentleman shouldered another on the street 
out came the swords and perhaps the coroner had a case 
or two cases. In the days of Queen Elizabeth the young 
men with their long rapiers were as much of a problem as 
the young women now with their short skirts. An act was 
passed to clip the gents' swords to the same length, so that 
there should be no inequality of arms whenever the duel- 
istic individuals had a scrap on the street. 

All this enables us to obtain an historical perspective 
on the temperate habits of the American gentleman before 
the Volsteaders got in their fanatical work. We have all 
come upwards from the caveman, or worse, and it takes 
centuries to accomplish even the slightest moral progress. 
But we were progressing very creditably before Volstead 
put an obstruction in the road to make the Car of Progress 
break both axles and go tumbling into the ditch. 

Mr. Volstead and his associate fanatics, assumed that 



unless the Inquisition were restored the American people 
would all go straight to hell. We have never seen any 
proofs that the Prohibitionists are in the close and confi- 
dential confidence of the Almighty. We have to take their 
words for what they are worth and they seem to be 
worthless. The fanatics reason from the false premises, 
that the United States was on the high road to delirium 
tremens when the incontrovertible fact is, that strong drink 
was losing its grip on our best people. And always the 
worst people copy, in some degree, their betters. In an 
empire the subjects imitate the czar. In a Democracy the 
mob is impressed by the Four Hundred. 
* * * 

When all the saloons were in full blast and mostly 
selling impure rectified whiskey, made in the cellars by 
crooked wholesalers, not five per cent of the saloon patrons 
got drunk every night, or any night. Of all the business 
men, lawyers, mechanics and others one knew, how many 
were seen staggering out of saloons and falling in the 
gutter? Not one in a hundred. Perhaps not one in a 
thousand. How many citizens who took their glass after 
the days work were unable to show up at business next 
monring? Certainly not one in a thousand. 

And this temperance mind you, in a scandalous con- 
dition of the liquor business, created and encouraged by 
our own governments, municipal and federal. Some day 
unless the crust of the earth crack and drop us where booze 
will not quench thirst, the history of the American liquor 
trade may be written by intelligent historians. If so, 
emphasis laid on the wonderful fact that the American 
people advanced in health and temperance notwithstanding 
the efforts of their governments, local and federal, to de- 
grade and poison them by unlimited saloon, selling so-called 
"rectified whiskey." 

The year before the Volsteaders re-established the 
Inquisition, the United States collected duty on 175.000.000 
gallons of whiskey. Of that amount, only 75,000,000 was 
real whiskey, made in a distillery. The other 100,000.000 
gallons of booze were made in the cellars of crooked whole- 
salers, interested in establishing and running saloons. The 
United States licensed those crooked wholesalers 'to make 
their poison whiskey in the cellars. All that was nec- 
essary, was to pay to the Internal Revenue the small sum 
of eighty dollars a year. On payment of that money the 
Internal Revenue issued to a whiskey dealer a "Rectifier's 
License" which permitted him to put any kind of dope 
in a bottle, label it "Rectified Whiskey," and sell it over a 
bar to the public. The United States authorities made no 
inquiries as to the chemical contents or ingredients of such 
liquor. It might be the most villainous compounds, and 
in man}- cases was such. Short of putting deadly poison 
in "Rectified Whiskey" the wholesale dealers stopped at 
nothing. Fake whiskey is easy to make with some alcohol 
and a few chemicals. It can be made more like real distilled 
whiskey by adding a small portion of pure whiskey which 
imparts to the compound o "Bouquet" not otherwise ob- 
tained. 4. 4, 4, 

Naturally a crooked, grafting whiskey dealer would 
prefer to manufacture his stock in trade in his cellar at a 
trifling cost. There was another reason, very powerful, 
in driving whiskey dealers into the rectified rascality. They 
paid duty only upon the actual alcohol which they used. 
The honest distiller who made whiskey in the proper way, 
paid duty on every gallon of liquor and some percentage 
of it is water. Thus the distiller paid duty on the water in 
his whiskey as well as the actual alcohol. But water cost 
a rectifier nothing. He just turned on the faucet in his 
cellar and added what water he needed to his compound of 
spirits of wine and chemicals used in faking up the awful 
concoction of what the trade designated as "Sheepherder's 
Delight." The more violent its kick the better the sale, 
but none of it was not more injurious than the floods of 
"bootleg" that caused Mr. Barnes of the New York World 
to declare our country is the "Bootleggers Paradise." 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR AUGUST 6, 1921 



Twists of Politics 

By M. T. EDWARDS 



A GENERAL CHRISTIAN SMUTS has become almost 
the central figure of European politics, in the short 
span of 20 years. Some say that he is in a fair way to 
become the Premier of the United States of Great Britain. 
His success, thus far, in compromising the hitherto impos- 
sible differences in Ireland have brought him prominently 
before the American reading public, by reason of the news- 
paper prominence given him. It was de Valera who sug- 
gested that General Smuts should be intrusted with the 
preliminaries of the Irish Conference, now actually in prog- 
ress in London. No other prominent man would have been 
likely to attempt the task. But Smuts has courage as well 
as talent. 

He was one of the prominent figures in the Boer war 
and was regarded with confidence by Oom Paul of the 
Dutch republic after Smuts returned to South Africa from 
England, where he went to receive his legal education in 
Cambridge University. 

He sided with the Boer people in the quarrel with 
England. 

"I didn't go in with my own people," said Smuts in after 
years, "because they were my own people, but because they 
were right." Kruger made Smuts State's Attorney in the 
Dutch republic of the Transvaal. He wrote the notes which 
Lord Milner answered or inspired and the great Boer war 
resulted. Smuts discarded the ineffective pen when the 
first shot was fired and fought very gallantly throughout 
the unequal contest. His career is without a parallel in our 
generation. Jan Christian Smuts has been covered with 
honors by the Greater Britain that hesitates to crush 
Ireland in blood and iron as it did the little African Republic 
two decades ago. As Major General the man who would 
never be forgiven has commanded with success a British 
army in the field. As a right honorable Privy Councilor he 
was summoned to take his place in the imperial council 
chamber at the hour of the British Empire's greatest need. 
As Ambassador Plenipotentiary he was chosen to carry on 
those important secret negotiations with Austria-Hungary 
in 1917 the exact nature of which has never been disclosed, 
and at the World Council of Peace he sat at the table with 
his old antagonists, and indeed there he proved their sword 
and buckler ! 

General Smuts is often described as a big, burly man. 
It is true that General Smuts is a large man and particu- 
larly full and deep chested, but his proportions are so nearly 
perfect that he does not get the credit of his six feet and 
over until you stand close beside him. He carries his fifty 
odd years very gavlv and his fair hair was hardly touched 
with gray when he left Paris in I'M". His appearance is not 
thai of an Englisman or yet of a Boer. His fresh, clear, 
blond complexion and extremely blue eyes made French- 
men think Stunts must have come from Normandy. And 
perhaps his ancestors did. 

The South African Premier whose services are so fre- 
quently used by Lloyd George has one very great 
advantage over many of his brother statesmen. His rugged 
health gives him a remarkable capacity for work at all 
hours and in places which many would find inconvenient. 
and he can eat anything or eat nothing, just as best serves 
his purpose. During the interallied mission to Southeastern 
Europe in the Spring of 1919. his powers of endurance 
served him to excellent purpose. With the South African 
as night fell, if there was available a little two by tour 
sleeping berth it was very good, and if he had to curl up 
in his seat and take what rest he could it was evidently 
'. too. for General Smuts, if not so well for the 
temper of some of his associates ! 

It is a most extraordinary turn of polities that this 
South African statesman, who fought the English so cour- 



ageously should be the man to lead the president of the 
imaginary but irrepressible Irish republic to London, to 
discuss home rule on a new basis, after Ireland has been 
in a virtual state of revolt for seven centuries. It speaks 
volumes for the courage of Smuts. He is evidently a cour- 
ageous man, who, believing anything his duty dares do it. 

In every large city, the wholesalers manufacturing 
rectified dope prior to Prohibition, stimulated the issuance 
of saloon licenses. Saloon licenses were part of the graft. 
Wholesalers could supply a customer with a saloon license 
and start him in business to sell their "rectified" poison. 
The saloon keeper was often a mere chattel, and the whole- 
saler trimmed him until he either made a success or lost his 
few dollars and gave way to a new tenant. 

Think what such a state of affairs meant to the United 
States, and ponder on the morality of a great nation like 
ours descending to the licensing of "rectified" whiskey for a 
paltry sum. Think too of the confusion of ethics which 
exists when we undertake to clean house for many foreign 
peoples when our own home is so sadly in need of white- 
wash and moral chloride of lime. 

It is a great credit to the character of our American 
citizens, that in spite of the scandalous graft and rascality 
of the old liquor business, our people continued to grow 
more temperate in the true sense. To be a drunkard was 
to be an outcast in any reputable calling. To a lawyer or 
doctor it was ruin to be identified as a booze-fighter, though 
a generation before that, great lawyers stood openly before 
public bars and rich merchants made the saloon a place for 
important negotiations. 

But the even progress of true temperance has been 
halted by Volstead fanaticism. In fifty years we cannot 
rectify the evils that flow from puritanical Prohibition as 
attempted in the United States. Genuine Americanism is 
in revolt against the destruction of personal liberty, and 
contempt of the law is becoming a public virtue. 
* * * 

The newspapers say that Jack Dempsey has gone to 

New York for a few days. His late winnings will stand 
that long if two meals a day satisfy him. 

* * * 

Every broker in the employ of the Board of Works is 

9ed heavily to carry on the battle against the Open 
Shop. The stone cutters and pavers are compelled to con- 
tribute five dollars a day. 

* * * 

Juggs — I say. do you thing Binks is a man to be trust- 
ed? Buggs — Trusted? Why. rather. I'd trust him with 
my life. Juggs — Oh, yes, but with anything of value, I 
mean. 

* + * 

"Remember Job — he was the most patient man who ever 
lived." "Yes, but don't forget one thing." "What is that?" 
"He never had to ride ten miles on a flat tire with a quarrel- 
some wife." 



The EYE and the BRAIN 

Poor Memory, Headache, i Guineas, 

Sensitive 

-. Floating s: »ts, Crusty 

nutated E3 ■■ - natism. 

Watery Kyes and it, see ob- 

■ arly — all these .-vinptoms and 

-■ 

. attributed 3TRAIN. 

TO RELIEVE THKrfE AILMENTS 

YOU MUST REMOVE THE CAUSE 
The lai instru- 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

EXCLUfi IGHT SPECIALIST 

ans 

960 MARKET STREET 

Between Mason and Taylor 
SAN FRANCISCO 




10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



^/tornoijlo 




FORD A FINANCIAL WIZARD 

WITH the statement that Henry 
Ford has turned the corner 
of financial liquidation and 
general depression conies the astonish- 
ing story of how the remarkable feat 
was accomplished — most remarkable 
in view of the fact that not a cent was 
borrowed from the bankers though 
they stood ready to lend $75,000,000, 
last January. '1 he particulars as told 
to the Detroit News by Mr. Ford are 
these. 

"On a late January afternoon last 
winter a high-powered motor car roll- 
ed up to the door of Henry Ford's home 
in Dearborn and out stepped a banker, 
formerly of Detroit, now connected 
with one of the biggest banks in New 
York. 

"In answer to his ring, the door 
swung wide and a moment later he 
was shaking hands with the motor 
manufacturer. 

"This banker, according to Air. 
Ford's associates, was the official emis- 
sary of a group of Wall Street banking 
interests, come to offer the manufac- 
turer a loan. 



* * * 



" 'But I do not need to borrow 
money." Mr. Ford is reported to have 
told him. I can finance all my com- 
panies' operations myself.' 

" 'I think not." the banker confiden- 
tly went on. We know your obliga- 
tions, we know your cash reserves and 
we know you need money. Now I 
have written out here a plan by which 
we can assist you. I would like to 
read it to you.' 

"The manufacturer is reported to 
have told him his effort would lie a 
waste of time and breath, but if he still 
wished to read his proposition he might 
do so. Tin' manufacturer did him the 
courtesy of listening. 
* * * 

"The reading went on for several 
minutes. Then the banker, suddenly 
breaking off, asked, 'Who's going to be 
the new Treasurer of your company?' 
(The former treasurer had recently 
resigned.) 



* * * 



" 'That makes no difference to you, 
does it?' the manufacturer answered. 

" 'Oh. yes, it does,' the banker came 
back. 'We'll have to have some say 
as to who the new Treasurer shall be.' 

"That remark closed the interview. 

' T handed him his hat,' said Mr. 

Ford, 'showed him where the door was 



and told him to take his things and 
get out right quick." 

Mr. Ford did not borrow a dollar 
from the banks though the business 
condition six months ago would have 
driven most men into panic and sent 
them running to the money lenders. 
The buyers of the United States had 
gone on strike. The great Ford plants 
were closed. 

The first thing to do was to econ- 
omize, and no one knew better than 
Henry Ford how to accomplish that.. 
He is a wizard on shop efficiency. 
The next thing to be done was to get 
the unsold cars off his hands and into 
those of the dealers. Mr. Ford went 
East and found some $91,000,000 in 
unsold cars and parts in New York, 
Philadelphia and Boston. Changes in 
personnel followed and others were 
threatened. * * * 

According to the story told in Wall 
Street, the methods by which Mr. 
Ford raised $67,000,000 last January 
and was able to defy the money pow- 
ers were somewhat strenuous, but they 
undoubtedly not only turned the tide 
in his own direction but actually start- 
ed the whole automobile industry on 
the upgrade once more. He succeeded 
in transfering 125,000 surplus automo- 
biles from his own warehouse into the 
hands of 17,000 dealers. He did not 
ask their consent; he merely shipped 
every man his quota and drew drafts 
against him. The dealers knew that 
they must accept the cars or forfeit 
the agency, and a ford agency is too 
valuable an asset to be put into jeop- 
ardy. 

Few of them failed to accept the 
drafts and financed them in their own 
home towns. The recalcitrants have 
lived to regret it. By April 1 Ford 
had gathered in$67,000,000 by means of 
these methods. 

* * * 

Opening the year with 125.000 surplus 
cars Mr. Ford produced 3,000 machines 
in Januarv and sold 57,000. In Febru- 
ary he produced 35,000 and sold 63,000. 
In March he produced 60,000 and sold 
87.000. In April he produced 90.000 
and sold 100,000. His May figure for 
production was 111,000 cars, his June 
figure 116,000 and in July, it is Mr. 
Ford's boast that he turned out 4.000 
cars a day and selling every car. 

"By the end of April inventories of 
the corporation had been reduced from 



$105,000,000 to 63,800,000. He had 
been manufacturing his inventory, in 
eluding spare parts, into finished car 
shipments to dealers, which went out 
with drafts attached. Since April a 
further remarkable spurt in business 
has taken place. 

"The Ford corporation's cash the 
first of June was around $36,000,000, 
and there were no outstanding obliga- 
tions except current merchandise ac- 
ceptances. The measure of sales since 
that time and now is factory capacity 
and not merchandising efforts. Mr. 
Ford's net profit before taxes are now 
understood to be at the rate of approx- 
imately $20,000,000 or about $190 profit 
per car. * * * 

"The Ford recovery was probably 

the most inspiring event possible to the 
motor industry. He was the first to 
cut prices. And his second reduction 
is of recent date. 

Where Mr. Ford formerly employed 
60.000 men to produce an average of 
4.000 cars daily, he now obtains an out- 
put of same volume with 45.000 men. 
The $6 minimum has been retained, but 
foremen have been put to work, ta>k^ 
doubled up and adjustments averaging 
twenty to twenty-five per cent re- 
duction made in wages." 

The best thing that could have hap- 
pened to Mr. Ford, was to have re- 
jected the Wall Street offerings of 
assistance in his temporary difficulty. 



Yellow Cab Kept Busy 

In the first two weeks of July, the 
Yellow Cab Manufacturing Co., Chica- 
go, 111., received orders from big fleet 
owners for 288 taxicabs. Two hundred 
of these go to Philadelphia — to the 
Quaker City Cab Co., and the Brown 
Cab Co. Fifty others have been 
bought by the American Taxicab Oper- 
ators. Inc., of New York. Cummings 
Brothers, of Boston, the Black and 
White Cab Co. of San Francisco, and 
the Yellow Cab Co. of Los Angeles, are 
also counted among the firm's recent 
buyers. J. B. Dub. sales manager of 
the Yellow Cab Manufacturing Com- 
pany, has recently returned from the 
Pacific Coast, and reports business in 
the far west as highly promising. 



Oakland to Get Severin Car 

It is reported that the Severin Motor 
Car Co., of Kansas City, is arranging 
removal to Oakland, Cal., and has taken 
options upon land for a new factory 
there. This announcement followed 
the filing at Sacramento of articles of 
incorporation of the Severin Motor 
Car Corp. of Oakland, with a capital 
stock of $1,000,000 in $10 par value 
shares. Incorporators of the company 
include L M. Severin, president of the 
Kansas City company ; C. R. Morse, 
who is also connected with the com- 
pany; J. R. Elrod. of the Harvey 
Wheel Co.. of Oakland; E. E. Keyes, 
r.nd F. W. Cunningham. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR AUGUST 6, 1921 



New Phase of Auto Theft 

A new phase of auto stealing is un- 
der investigation by the police. Dis- 
honest owners it is charged conspire 
with thieves to have cars stolen and 
shipped out of the country so as to 
collect insurance. Adroit traffickers 
strip valuable American motor cars of 
their identifying markings and ship 
machines to South American and Aus- 
tralia for sale. Some cars have found 
their way into England for delivery as 
"used." 

For the exportation business a thief 
steals the car the day before he ships. 
If he is sending it to Porto Rico or a 
South American country he usually 
drives it to the pier, where it is turned 
over to a confederate. Often these 
cars are being disposed of thus for the 
insurance. Invariably they are the 
best type of car. 

Many notaries have affixed their 
stamp and signatures to bills of sale 
exchanged by men unknown to them. 
This is in direct violation of the law. 

"The auto thief can walk into many 
a notary's office and say 'I'm Bill 
Smith and this is Jim Brown; he's all 
right,' and nine times out of ten the 
notary will do business with them. 

"More stolen cars probably would be 
shipped if the freight rate were not so 
large. For the South American jour- 
ney it is not necessary to crate the 
machines." 



The New Car. 

When a car is new, wash it with cold 
water, as it will help to set the var- 
nish. 

To remove grease or oil on fenders 
and wheels use some brand of automo- 
bile soap (commonly known as soft 
soap), dissolved in water, can be used; 
however, do not use on body, as it 
affects the gloss of the varnish. When 
purchasing soap of this kind, you can 
In- somewhat safe by inquiring what 
it is made from. A soft soap made of 
pure vegetable oils, chemically neutral 
and containing no free alkali, or any 
other acid or grit to bite into fine fin- 
ishes, is recommended, 

Do not wash the hood when it is 
warm, as this will cause it to lose its 
lustre. 

Do not rub body with sponge unless 
necessary ; it always holds sand or grit. 
Wash by rinsing off as much as pos- 
sible. 

Do not plav a sharp stream of water 
onto car while washing: it will drive 
small particles of sand, miniature 
stones, etc.. into the paint. 

This finish can be quickly spoiled by 
lack of care, or may be preserved by 
using proper precautions. 

Light dust may be blown off or re- 
moved with a duster. When necessary 
to use water, let it run slowly from a 
hose with a sprinkling nozzle or no 
nozzle at all. Dried mud should be 
removed as soon as possible as it in- 
jures the finish. Soak it with water 



applied with a sponge or a gentle 
stream from a hose ; after it is soften- 
ed, wash it away carefully. 

When through washing, dry care- 
fully with a chamois. 

Lamp black or regular silver cleaner 
paste are most frequently used to clean 
nickel-plated parts. Use a soft flan- 
nel or chamois to rub with. 



CONDITIONS ABROAD CONTRASTED 

The present French and German selling 
policies are almost opposite, according to Al- 
fred FantI, an American buyer who has re- 
turned from a business trip abroad. 

"Few physical signs of the great war that 
swept France were visible to me," he said, 
"in the territory I traversed. The people 
appeared healthy and happy and eager for 
amusement. Behind these evidences of pros- 
perity, however, the country is by no means 
in good financial shape. Loans are impos- 
sible to obtain, even for three and four 
times the amount in good collateral. Financ- 
ing is at a standstill. 

"In buying goods from the French, even 
more than the usual amount of vigilance is 
required. The extravagance of the Ameri- 
can soldiers created a general idea that we 
will pay anything for what we desire. There 
is a good deal of difference, as I discovered, 
between the price made on goods for Ameri- 
can consumption and that which is made on 
merchandise to be offered in the local stores. 
I tested this out in several cases by telling 
salesmen that the order was for local or Paris 
consumption. Fifty per cent off seemed to 
be the general rule. Moreover, a strange 
thing about French manufacturers, and the 
smaller ones particularly, is that they will 
offer a lower price on a smaller order than 
on a large one. This is because they are not 
equipped to turn out the merchandise on a 



11 



large scale, since they possess neither the ma- 
terial nor the labor. 

"In Germany an entirely different policy 
prevails. The nation is upset and unsettled 
under its new form of government, but the 
manufacturers are out to do business. While 
the people resent 'working for the French,' 
as they put it, they are determined to pull 
themselves out of their difficulties. They of- 
fer rock bottom prices and are eager to make 
concessions for quantity. A contrast is af- 
forded between conditions there and here in 
the shipbuilding industry. Stagnation here 
may be compared with great activity in Ger- 
many. The Krupps have put on 28,000 ad- 
ditional workers. While they are friendly to 
America, they are not interested in buying 
any goods but raw materials. I have no 
doubt that, regardless of the tariff we pass, 
they will sell goods to us. 

"The effects of prohibition in this coun- 
try are already noticeable in the number of 
South American buyers to be found at the 
foreign capitals and business centers. Rep- 
resentatives of other nations are flocking to 
England and the Continent." 



Restaurant Keeper — I hope the sau- 
sage was all right. Guest, I feel it has 
given me horsepower. 



"Why did you discharge that splen- 
did cook you had?" "It was the only 
way to get our guests to go home." 



The wilder tribes of Bedouins either prac- 
tice sun worship or have no religion. . 



In India it is common for a judge to in- 
dulge in smoking while on the bench. 



In India the person who sneezes while say- 
ing his prayers immediately begins them over 
again. 



CASA DEL REY 



Santa Cruz 
California 



THE MILLION DOLLAR FIREPROOF HOTEL 

The ideal Spot tor your summer outing with its warm beach bathing: 
dancing: good music; artistic, home-like, spacious lobby. 

This is a most wonderful place for children. Beautiful playgrounds; 
sanitary warm bathing pool; swimming instructors; saddle ponies 
children. Special kitchenette where maid can prepare food for j 
children. 

Motor roads in fine condition via Sargents, Chittenden Pass and Wat- 
sonville, on tin (.'oast Route via La Honda. The Southern Pacific offers 
special round trip, week-end rates as well as tickets good for several 
weeks. 

Cottage City, operated on the European plan, is also under the same 
management as Casa Pel Rev. 

Correspondence regarding rates for families with maids and children 
solicited. Special rates by the week or for extended si month or 

two. Vddress 

CASA DEL REY, Santa Cruz, Calif. 

MORRIS & WARNER. Propri 

TELEPHONE 600 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 




ociot 




Engagements 

AT a bridge party given Tuesday 
at her home in Oakland, Miss 
Doris Rodolph, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Charles Rodolph, announced 
her engagement to Mr. Harold Havre, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Havre of 
Oakland and San Francisco. 
An engagement celebration, a wel- 
come to a bridal couple and a farewell 
formed the motives for the al fresco 
party which Mrs. Leila Butler Stod- 
dard gave Sunday to welcome Mr. 
and Mrs. Walter Hedges Jr., the for- 
mer a son of the hostess, return- 
ed recently from a honeymoon tour 
of several weeks. 

The afternoon also celebrated the 
engagement of Miss Leila Hedges and 
Dr. Edward H. Dennen of New York. 
Miss Hedges is the daughter of Mrs. 
Stoddard. The marriage will take 
place in New York in December. Miss 
Hedges is a granddaughter of Mrs. 
Emma Butler and a niece of Mrs. Fred- 
erick W. McNear. She has been at- 
tending school in New York for sever- 
al years. 

Mrs. Stoddard and Miss Hedges 
leave this week for Alaska, to be away 
several weeks. 

The party Sunday took place in the 
picturesque canyon on the Stoddard 
estate across the bay. 

The engagement of Miss Norma 

Thayer, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. A. 
Thayer, to John Raggio Jr., was an- 
nounced at a luncheon, at which Miss 
Thayer entertained at her home on 
Hyde street on Saturday. John Rag- 
gio is the son of the late John Raggio 




s> 



^ maptJlppareL 

ron (JUom&n 

and n]jss&S 



SKile aivcl Quality 
U/iikovit ExtpaVa^artcc? 




of Stockton and Mrs. Raggio. The 
wedding will take place on August 31. 
Miss Lorna Williamson and An- 
drew Talbot will be married at St. 
Luke's church on October 8, followed 
by a reception at the Fairmont hotel. 
Miss Jean Webster, a cousin of Miss 
Williamson, will be in the bridal party. 
The personnel of the party is not com- 
pleted. Mrs. Harry H. Magee (Juani- 
ta Ghirardelli, a bride of the last year, 
gave a luncheon in honor of Miss Wil- 
liamson Thursday at her home across 
the bay. 

The engagement has been an- 
nounced of Mrs. Jacques de la Mon- 
tanya and Dana Millard McEwen of 
of San Jose. Mrs. de la Montanya is 
the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. J. 
Lyon and the widow of Lieutenant de 
la Montanya, who was killed in France. 
Dana McEwen is the son of the late 
John J. McEwen and Mrs. McEwen. 
During the war he served overseas as 
a lieutenant in the 144th field artillery. 
The wedding date has not been set. 

Luncheons 

Miss Margaret Madison, who will 

be married on September 12 to Mr. 
Wakefield Baker, was the principal 
guest at a luncheon given Tuesday by 
Miss Amanda McNear. The luncheon 
took place at the Town and Country 
Club, in one of the attractive new priv- 
ate dining-rooms. There was a large, 
round table, attractively trimmed with 
baskets of flowers. 

Mrs. James Carolan and her 

daughter Miss Emily Carolan are 
spending the summer in Burlingame. 
They are occupying the home of Mrs. 
Carolan's daughter, Mrs. Harry Poett, 
while the Poett family is in Europe. 
Miss Emily Carolan gave a luncheon 
on Friday for Mrs. Frank West of 
Washington. 

Mrs. John Barrette, wife of Col. 

Barrette of Fort Miley, entertained at 
the Town and Country Club on Wed- 
nesday in honor of Mrs. William Ma- 
son Wright, wife of Major General 
Wright. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Ford enter- 
tained informally at luncheon at their 
home in San Mateo Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. George A. Pope, of 

Burlingame entertained at a delightful 
informal luncheon at their beautiful 
home Saturday in honor of Mr. and 
Mrs. Douglas Fairbanks, popularly 
known in the motion-picture world as 
Doug Fairbanks and Mary Pickford. 



Others present were Mr. and Mrs. Ray- 
mond Welsh of Burlingame and Joseph 
O. Tobin of San Francisco. Preceding 
the luncheon, Mary Pickford was film- 
ed in several scenes in the Pope gar- 
dens and on the verandas for her next 
picture. 

Mrs. Samuel Knight gave a lun- 
cheon and bridge party Friday at her 
home in Burlingame and had as guests 
Mrs. Alexander Barceau, Mrs. Daniel 
C. Jackling, Mrs. Templeton Crocker, 
Mrs. Walter Martin, Mrs. Augustus 
Taylor, Mrs. Sidney Cloman, Mrs. 
Mountford Wilson, Mrs. William Ma- 
son Wright, Mrs. Willard Chamber- 
lain and a few others. 

Mrs. Bennie P. Schwerin gave a 

luncheon and bridge party Thursday 
at her home in San Mateo, entertain- 
ing a group of friends who frequently 
meet for bridge games. 

Mrs. Alfred Oyster, who with her 

family is passing the summer in Palo 
Alto, assembled a group of her friends 
at luncheon Tuesday at the Menlo 
Country Club. 

Dinners 

Miss Lawton Filer gave a dinner a 

few evenings ago at her home in Mon- 
tecito for Miss Lillian Hopkins and 
Miss Frances Pringle, who are in Santa 
Barbara for a fortnight. 
Mr. and Mrs. Jean de St. Cyr en- 
tertained at dinner at their home in 
San Mateo Monday in honor of Mrs. 
J. J. Van Kaathovan of Los Angeles 
and her son Barklie Henry of Phila- 
delphia, who are visiting at the St. 
Cyr home. The Van Kaathovans are 
cousins of Mrs. St. Cyr. 
Mr. and Mrs. St. Cyr had an infor- 
mal dinner on Sunday evening, having 
Mr. and Mrs. Rennie Pierre Schwerin, 
Admiral Alexander Halstead, Comman- 
der Robert Lopez and William Elli- 
cott. 

Mrs. Frederick McNear is wearing 

some unusually pretty clothes since 



The 
Palace 

FOR 

Exclusive 
Entertainment 

Management of ***Yl 

Halscy E. Manwaring 




CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR AUGUST 6, 1921 



13 



her return from her honeymoon. At 
the dinner given Thursday evening by 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles McCormick at 
Atherton, she was very handsome in 
green and silver brocaded satin. Green 
is a becoming color which Mrs. Mc- 
Near often wears. The dinner was 
given for Mr. and Mrs. McNear and 
also to celebrate Mr. and Mrs. McCor- 
mick's crystal wedding. 

Week End Parties 

Mrs. Richard Carroll and her 

daughter, Mrs. William R. Whittier, 
entertained several friends over the 
week end at Menlo Park, where they 
are occupying the lovely old home of 
Mrs. Carroll's father, the late Mr. 
Murphy. The week-end guests were 
Mrs. Constance Peters, Mr. Wilber- 
force Williams and Mr. Howard 
Throckmorton. 

-Mr. and Mrs. Harrison Dibblee en- 
tertained the younger social set at a 
large dance at the Marin Golf and 
Country Club on Saturday evening in 
honor of their daughter. Miss Betsy 
Dibblee, and their son, Harrison Dib- 
blee Jr. Several small dinners were 
arranged to precede the affair, which 
was the principal event of the wick 
end in Marin society. 

Intimations 

Dr. Humphrey J. Stewart, who 

came from Los Angeles to direct the 
rehearsals and final performance of 
"John of Nepomuk," the Bohemian 
Club grove play, for which he wrote 
music, will be accompanied back to 
San Diego by his daughter, Mrs. Leroy 
Woodhead and her three children. 
Mrs. Woodhead has lived in Mendocino 
county since her marriage. She was 
in San Francisco a few months ago 
visiting Mrs. Ferdinand Thieriot and 
M is. Joseph * Hiver Tobin. 

Mr. Eugene Lent and his daughter. 

Miss Frances and Miss Ruth Lent, 
who arc traveling in Europe, write of 
an interesting trip they made the first 
part of this month from Paris to Lon- 
don by airplane. They expect to re- 
turn to Paris soon and will spend two 
months more in Europe. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Deve 

are being congratulated on the birth 
of a son on Friday of last week The 
youngster is their iirst child. 

Mr. and Mrs. \Y. \Y. Spence and 

their pretty debutante daughter, Miss 
bla Lee Spence. of Baltimore, are vis- 
iting Mr. and Mrs. George T. Marye 
at Burlingame. Mrs. Marye enter- 
tained some friends at a luncheon par- 
ty in their honor on Sunday. 

Mrs. Ella Pierce Breyfogle anil 

Mrs. Raymond Russ have taken apart- 
ments at the Fairmont Hotel, where 
they will be established until their 
Europe in September. 

Mrs William 11. La Boyteaux and 

her daughters. Miss Elizabeth and Miss 



Mary La Boytcaux, who usually come 
from their home in New York to Cal- 
ifornia for the sumer, are spending this 
summer in Europe. They went abroad 
last month and are now in Paris after 
a visit to Coblenz, where the fiance of 
Miss Elizabeth La Boyteau, Lieuten- 
ant Edward Sandford Pegram, is sta- 
tioned with the Army of Occupation. 
In Paris the trousseau of Miss La Boy- 
teau is being selected, and the family 
will return to New York in September 
to prepare for the wedding which will 
take place in October. 

In Town and Out 

Miss Eudora Clover, who is spend- 
ing the summer at her ranch at Clo- 
verdale, has come to town for a few 
day's visit and is at the Fairmont. She 
will return to Washington for the win- 
ter. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Gregory 

Parrott and Mrs. Parrott's sister, Miss 
Lillian Hopkins arrived Monday from 
Santa Barbara. Mr. and Mrs. Parrott 
visited the Leigh Syphers at their sum- 
mer home in Montecito, and Miss Hop- 
kins was a house guest of Mr. and 
Mrs. Edward J Pringle and Miss Fran- 
ces Pringle who are in the south for 
several weeks. 

Mrs. James Ward Kceney will go 

to Santa Barbara in a few days to vis- 
it her daughters, Mrs. Talbot Walker, 
and Mrs. George Boiling Lee. 

Mrs. Jessie Bowie Detrick who has 

been in Honolulu for a month, visiting 
her son, Bowie Detrick, is at her home 
on Jackson street. 

E. R. Folger, accompanied by his 

daughter, Miss Betty Folger, came 
home from Europe, their sojourn 
abroad having been cut short on ac- 
count of the recent death of James V 
Folger, brother of E. R. Folger. Mrs. 
Ernest K. Folger and Miss Elena will 
remain several weeks longer. For the 
nt they arc at Biarritz . Miss Bet- 
ty Folger and Robert Miller will be 
married in October. 

Mrs. Elkins dcGuigne returned on 

Sunday evening from Del Monte, 
where gayety pervaded over the week- 
end. Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Tobin. 
who have been occupying the Clark 
villa at Pebble Beach for the last 
fortnight., will remain out of town for 
another week. 

Dr. and Mrs. George Willcutt re- 
turned from Ross Valley, where they 
had one of the Barber houses for two 
months On Friday they will leave for 
Lake Tahoe and will spend three 
weeks at Tahoe Tavern, 



\A/11E\ in Sanfc Clara Vallej see the 
" valley from tl- scenic electric lines. 

Trolk' rips star: from San ] - 

\lto. 
PENINSULA RAILWAY CO. 

SAN JOSE, CAL. 




HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 



•SAN FRANCISCO- 

A BIG HOTEL 
uWHEBE THE LITTLE THINGS COUNTl 



The Witchery and Charm 

of the New Compositions 
played by 

ART HICKMAN 

and his Famous Orchestra 
will captivate you. 

IN 

THE GARDEN 

9 to 1 
every evening 

THOS. J. COLEMAN 
Manager 



.1. E. BIRMINGHAM Main Corridor 



PALACE HOTEL 

* * * 
.1 EWELS 

* * * 

REMODELING 

* * * 

UNIQUE DESIGNS 

* * * 
EINE JEWELRY 

» « » 
EXPERT 



Opposite Rose Room 

* * * 
In Platinum 

* * * 

Old Styles Into New 

* * * 
Time-Keeping Watches 

* * * 

Of All Descriptions 

* * * 
Repair Work 



NEW YORK 



LONDON 



\ TREATMENT FOR Till: SCALP 
ANt. HAIR. Sclentlflcal 

illy perfect, established and 

i by Amerli an 
Nuroes, unqua I and 

THE FRANCES FOX INSTITUTE 

■ the Scientific Care of the Hair 
506 Crocker Bldg., Market and Post 
Phone Sutter 5118 



(IV Stand for the Best in Business Training 



Munson fPf §1 School 




FOR 

Private Secretaries 

600 SUTTER ST. FRANKLIN 306 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 





^financial; 




THE BEST AUTHORITIES in the 

United States and abroad are now 
agreed that the danger point has been 
passed in the financial situation and 
that conditions in Europe and else- 
where will soon assume an almost 
normal condition. When such author- 
ities say "soon" they mean that within 
a year we may have approached com- 
fortably near the normal. There is no 
doubt whatever, as announced in the 
SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER a 
week ago, money is far more liquid to- 
day than it was a month ago and it is 
also more liquid than it was a week 
ago- * * * 

Locally, retail trade is somewhat im- 
proved although it may not be truth- 
full)' said that business is better than 
fair. People are buying only the ne- 
cessities and in this they are emulating 
the retail merchant who, for a long 
time, has bought only that which he 
must absolutely have in order to keep 
his lines complete. People are not yet 
buying luxuries and it will be some 
time before the old habit comes back 
to them of squandering money on 
things that are not actually needed. 

* * * 

We note that the retail merchants 
of the city have been banded together 
in a sort of mutual defense association 
and that they will foregather to com- 
pare notes as to how to cut expenses 
and lessen the overhead, remedy evils 
complained of by the public, and put 
a more efficient spirit in retail mer- 
chandising. * * * 

It is a good move and will, if it is 
taken hold of enthusiastically by all, 
especially by the smaller of the retail 
concerns, result in much good to the 
merchants, and if properly managed, 
will result in benefitting the consumer 
as well. * * * 

It is noted, too, that the fiurst of the 
literature emanating from the public- 
ity bureau of the association, which is 
called the Retail Merchant's Asso- 
ciation of San Francisco, has taken 
cognizance of the wide-spread popular 
notion that the retailer is, in many 
instances, a consciousless profiteer. It 
is proposed, we believe, to disprove 
this idea. It would be just as well, in 
cases where it is impossible to prove 
such charges untrue, that the associa- 
tion discipline the culprit guilty of 
gouging the public. 

* * * 

And this, in the mind of the publish- 
er brings up the question of free use 
of newspapers and magazines for pro- 



paganda purposes. Some day and this 
will come soon the publishers of this 
country are going to draw the line very 
sharply between what is real news and 
what is propaganda. The columns of 
newspapers, periodicals and maga- 
zines are supposed to be open to all 
kinds of organizations without charm' 
for propaganda . This has been the 
custom for years and the good natured 
publishers have allowed the abuse to 
grow until it is an evil that is very 
difficult to eradicate. We note that 
it is the intention of the association 
mentioned to run a publicity bureau 
full blast. * * * 

THE FORDNEY ACT. It may be 

said with truth that the provisions 
of the Fordney Tariff Act will not 
help us to do business in foreign 
countries. It may be necessary. Some- 
times, to provide protection for cer- 
tain industries in their development 
but the application of high tariff on all 
goods from foreign countries has a 
double effect in protecting those who 
are quite capable of competing with 
the foreigner and in causing the cost of 
living to remain very high in this coun- 
try. Another effect is found in the fact 
that foreign nations will naturally and 
logically divert their trade to such 
countries as trade with them, along 
the lines of least resistance. The Ford- 
ney law is in many directions harmful 
to us. The schedules are considerably 
higher in many instances than those 
proposed under the Underwood Act 
and about the same as those imposed 
under the Payne-Aldrich law. There 
are some good features to be found 
in instances where industries really are 
in need of protection. These instances 
are very few, however. 
* * * 

SHIPPING— The passage of the 
Tariff measure in Congress will not 
have the effect of making it any easier 
for our shipping men and for the ex- 
porter and importer. Shipping busi- 
ness and importing and exporting are 
largely dependent on whatever there is 
in business that is of a reciprocal nat- 
ure. There is no tendency to reciproc- 
ity in levying taxes, to be paid by the 
consumer, on articles of foreign manu- 
facture. The older this nation be- 
comes and the more efficient she be- 
comes in her methods of manufacture 
the less is there any need for the in- 
fliction of a high tariff. Those who are 
interested as manufacturers, who de- 
sire to sell their surplus abroad, or 
who are interested in the marketing or 



transportation of these goods, must 
look upon anything like a high tariff 
with apprehension. There is much 
adverse criticism. The new tariff, if 
enacted, will mean an added revenue 
to the government of something like 
five hundrd million dollars, all of which 
is taken directly out of the pockets of 



GRANDMOTHERLY LEGISLATION 
CONDEMNED 

Sir Charles Sykes, M. P., who has just 
returned to London from a visit to the Unit- 
ed States and Canada, says, in an article 
contributed to Lloyd's Weekly: 

"So far as the United States is concerned, 
I have brought back two dominant impres- 
sions: First, the deep and, I believe, all 
but universal friendship of America toward 
Great Britain, and, secondly, that except in 
United States has less to teach this old coun- 
try than some people seem to think. 

"And, after all, it is natural that it should 
be so. All that is highest and best in the 
political and social life of the great Republic 
of the West has been derived from Great 
Britain. 

"In working out legislative and adminis- 
trative principles which we hold in common, 
the United States has, in my view, not pre- 
served as much of the freedom as we have 
ourselves retained. The tendency toward 
grandmotherly legislation is very strong in 
many States, and there is a narrow and re- 
pressive spirit at work which it is impossible 
to ignore. 

"On the whole, I had the feeling that there 
is more personal freedom in the Old World 
than in the New, and that liberty and dig- 
nity of the individual mean rather more to 
us than to our cousins. 

"I confess to being a lover of our old 
English ways and customs and at the same 
time a believer in British capacity to produce 
the best. 

"We have nothing to fear from the Unit- 
ed States. Of that I am assured. America 
is our friend and that friendship is real and 
vital, not only to us both, but to the world. 

"As to business, American is in posses- 
sion of great natural advantages, yet she is 
not on the whole in a better position than 
we are, and if we settle down to work, we 
shall come out of our post-war difficulties 
stronger than ever. 

"The tendency in the United States as in 
this country is not to realize that the days 
of artificial prosperity are numbered. To- 
day the whole world is hard up, and the 
only real cure for that is hard work." 



So Says the Maximum — "I couldn't have 
been speeding, your honor." "But you say 
yourself you were in a hurry." "Well, you 
know the rule — the more haste, the less 
speed." 



"Dobson is always bragging about 
his courage. Is he really cool in the 
face of danger?" "Well, his feet are." 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER EOR AUGUST 6, 1921 



IS 



San Francisco's Life Struggle 



After many years of servitude to 
the unions. San Francisco, in the hope 
of preserving its commercial, indus- 
trial and financial life, has declared its 
intention of adopting the American 
plan of employment. According to the 
record of San Francisco's retarded de- 
velopment, it was time that the citi- 
zens took some measures to hold what 
was left of their industry and com- 
merce. The city found its poulation 
at a standstill ; its business decreasing; 
its wealth diminishing; and its indus- 
tries closing their doors. The reason 
for this unhealthy condition was clear 
to everybody ; at the throat of indus- 
trial, commercial, and financial San 
Francisco was the hand of closed-shop 
unionism ; and closed shop unionism 
was throttling the city to death as 
closed-shop unionism will strangle any 
community. 

We shall watch with interest San 
Francisco's effort to free her business 
from the grasp of the walking dele- 
gate. It took a long time for the An- 
drew Furuseth's, the Pin Head McCar- 
thys the Andy Gallaghers, and all the 
other walking delegates to bring the 
city under control. They were aided 
by businessmen such as assisted our 
walking delegates to force the closed 
shop on our industries. These men 
joined open-shop associations only to 
betray their fellow-members for the 
undeliverable advantages the walking 
delegates promised as a reward for 
their treachery. When faced with 

threat of strike, they made agreements 

with their fellows to fighl the prop 
extortion to the end; and broke the 

agreements when a favorable oppor- 
tunity came. Some of them, pretend- 
ing to be for the open shop, flirted 
with the unions, and had on their pay- 
rolls walking delegates who called 
strikes on their business rivals, From 

the pockets of these men came the 
money that paid the hire of union pick- 
ets engaged to destroy the business 

of competitors, while posing as friends 
oi the open shop, they made secret 
donations to the local union organ, 
which gave them immunity from per- 

al attack, while trying to destroy 

their class 

With a condition such as that, the 
walking delegate gained absolute con- 
trol of Sail Francisco's industries, and 

not onl) said who should or should not 
be permitted to work, but who should 
or should not be allowed to do busi- 
ness, in San Francisco. Some indus- 
tries were chosen to prove what the 
walking delegate could do to business 
that refused to pay blackmail and ope- 
rate under cl p rule. Strikes 
were called for any reason or none at 
all ; boycotts were enforced by peaceful 



pickets armed with blackjacks and 
sandbags ; employes were beaten and 
maimed. After an effective struggle, 
the industry did one of three things : 
Capitulated ; went into bankruptcy ; or 
moved to San Francisco's most hated, 
because most dangerous, rival, Los 
Angeles. But whatever course the in- 
dustry took, it was another brilliant 
victory for the walking delegate, who 
was given his mead of praise by the 
subservient dailies, which told about 
the fate of the recalcitrant industry — 
except when it took up quarters in the 
southern city. It was a fact that so 
many of the industries were going to 
open-shop Los Angeles that awoke 
San Francisco to the misfortune it had 
incurred by fostering the closed shop. 
And now is on the fight that San 
Francisco says must be waged for its 
life. An, open-shop association has 
been formed to contest the industrial 
field with closed-shop unionism. The 
association guarantees to labor the 
right to earn a living in peace and 
safety, free from the domination of 
unionism, and exempt from the tribute 
extorted by walking delegates. There 
is to be no discrimination against 
workers because of religious, union, 
fraternal, or other affiliation; all are to 
be treated alike ; industry is to be an 
Open shop, to which competency is the 
sesame. 

I his fight for life against closed- 
shop unionism by a great city is of 
deep interest to Portland. There will 
be little said of it in our dailies. The 
tator will from time to time tell 
how the battle goes.— Portland Spec- 
tator. . 

RYAN'S FORECAST 

Thomas Fortune Ryan was among the 
prominent American business men who have 
sailed for Europe. He expects to be away 
about six weeks and will look after the in- 
terests he owns in the diamond mines in the 
Congo district. Before sailing. Mr. Ryan 
said to the reporters on board: 

"I feel confident that business conditions 
all over the world, with very few exceptions. 
are slowly improving. In this country or- 
derly but persistent liquidation has been go- 
ing on for many months. Our merchants 
are buying only what they can sell quickly 
for cash. The consumers have had to listen 
to so much pessimistic talk that they buy 
only what is absolutely necessary for their 
daily wants People everywhere have been 
scared. They are getting over that. Our 
people arc the greats consumers of food 
and manufactured products in the world in 
normal nmes— and normal times are slowly 
coming hack. 



NEWSPAPER MEN'S HOME 

James Gordon Bennett's executors are 
ready to build the home for newspaper men 
as provided in the will of the late publisher. 

To get the cash, 941 lots on Dunwoodie 
Heights, Yonkers, have been sold. 

In the middle of the nineteenth century, 
when Forty-second street was almost out of 
town, the Bennett homestead was established 
far to the north, along the upper crest of 
Washington Heights. The Herald's editor 
subsequently enlarged his holdings with sev- 
eral tracts on Dunwoodie Heights, and dur- 
ing his lifetime he steadily refused to sell 
any part of the properties. After his death 
the executors of his estate ordered the sale 
of the Washington Heights homestead, and 
its 500 lots went for $1,768,100 at one of 
the most successful sales ever held in New 
York. 

Papa Didn't Do It — "Oh, Reginald, have 
you spoken to papa yet?" asked the excited, 
sweet young thing. "No, dear," was the re- 
ply of Reginald, "those cuts on my face I 
sot at the barber shop." — Yonkers States- 




CoroNA 

"The Fencr.il WMIm Ifuhlre" 

Fold It Up 
Take It With You 

Typewrite 

Anywhere 



Cal 



or write for 
Booklet 



$50.00-WITH CASE 

CORONA TYPEWRITER CO., Inc. 
Phone 54« Market street 

Buttel Sun Francisco 



PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC 
COMPANY 

28th Consecutive Quarterly Dividend 
on First Preferred Stock 

TH E regular dividend, for the three 
months ending July 31st, 1921. of 
$1.50 per share, upon the full-paid 
First Preferred Cap : tal Stock of the 
any will be paid on August 15th, 
to shareholders of record at the 
end of the quarterly period Checks 
will he ma-led in time to reach stock- 
holders on the date they are payable. 
A. F. HOCKFNBEAMER. 
Vice-President and Treasurer. 
San Francisco. California. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 




PL/EASUR.E/S WAND 



Death of Caruso 

CARUSO the greatest grand 
opera tenor of all times is dead, 
and many have read the news 
with regrets such as few crowned mon- 
archs are accorded when the announce- 
ment is blazoned forth: "The king is 
dead, long live king!" But the suc- 
cessor to the king of opera, crowned 
with laurels, will not be easily found. 
Perhaps for a century ; perhaps forever 
the place filled by Caruso will remain 
empty. Great tenors will arise, but a 
singer possessed of the genius and 
power of the grand artist who has just 
passed, may never again be heard on 
the operatic stage. Grand opera has 
no guarantee of immortality. Only a 
limited class now patronize it. 

Caruso had received the gifts of the 
gods — physical strength and personal- 
ity and a glorous voice which has giv- 
en pleasure to millions. Fortunately 
for mankind his vocal glories have been 
preserved. Future generations need 
not rely upon the tradition of his in- 
comparable power and vocal sweetness. 
The records of his arias will become 
like the pictures of a fine artist treas- 
ured and priceless as rare old jewels. 

Stricken down in the full flush of 
his great powers, Caruso fulfills the 
classic dictum that "whom the gods 
love die young." While his sun is at 
its height its plysical glory fades but 
the after glow continues. There will 
be for the great artist, none of the 
pitiful "lagging superfluous on the 
stage". 

Orpheum's Brilliant K. of C. Bill 

A better Orpheum has seldom been 
seen than that given this week, and 
the visiting "Knights" deserve most 
hearty thanks, if, as is frequently in- 
dicated by the actors, they are its in- 
spiration. They sat, hundreds of them, 
in the audience, and emphatically ex- 
pressed their delight in the perfor- 
mance. Gus Edwards' notable "Song 
Revue of 1921" is a remarkable aggre- 
gation of beautiful girls, pleasing music 
and lots and lots of spontaneous fun. 
The costumes are stunning and some 
of the scenes are artistically perfect. 
Lady Tsen Mei. a very entertaining 
Chinese girl, does some singing and 
dancing in a somewhat muffled man- 
ner. The trio of Bradley, Ardine and 
Fisher made diversion of unusual 
charm ; the winning smile of Mr. Fisher 
at the piano is irresistable. "Visions 
of 1971" with Percy Bronson and Win- 
nie is welcome again, and as full of 
laughs as ever. Jack Inglis kept us 
shouting with laughter for as many 



Obey No Wand but Pleasure's. — Tom Moore 

minutes as he was on the stage, and 
the Orpheum orchestra was in fine 

form. • 

Alcazar and Divorce 

Weeping to right of us. 

Weeping to left of us, 

Weeping behind us. 

Weeps on the stage. 

(We also wept.) 
Ben Erway at last has the great 
chance ; as "Dopie" in "The Divorce 
Question" he earns well-merited laur- 
els. Backed up by the rest of the com- 
pany, who put their greatest efforts 
into this week's production, this gift- 
ed young actor fairly sweeps the audi- 
ence off their feet. Dudley Ayres is 
well cast as the priest, and Edna Con- 
roy as the mother is excellent. Some 
humor is injected by the country cou- 
ple, and we have a brief but very good 
showing by Gladys George. The en- 
thusiastic reception by Alcazar patrons 
of this powerful play must be very 
gratifying to the management. 




Columbia 
"Over the Hill" is still drawing large 
audiences to every performance. This 
most human of emotional dramas 
makes its direct appeal to the heart, to 
all hearts. One hears the rumor that 
Henry Miller and Blanche Bates are 
coming to the Columbia soon, and this 
is good news to the many friends of 
these prime favorites. 



Alcazar Announcement 

In order to accommodate several 
thousand persons who were unable to 
witness "My Lady Friends" the great 
comedy success at the Alcazar Theatre 
will be given a second run at the O'Far- 
rell Street playhouse beginning Sunday 
afternoon, August 7th. The San Fran- 
cisco critics were a unit in pronounc- 
ing this piece the funniest of the year. 

The highly amusing story of the bi- 
ble merchant whose benevolences get 
him into a peck of trouble, and how 
his wife finds him with three affinities 
and a baby vamp in his Chickadee cot- 
tage at Atlantic City afford hearty 
laughs galore. 



"Peggy Machree" at Savoy 

Mrs. Denis O'Sullivan's delightful ro- 
mantic music play, "Peggy Machree" 
with Garry McGarry and Elsa Ryan 
and an excellent company, is pleasing 
Savoy audiences this week. The play, 
written by a popular San Franciscan, 
produced by the great and only Daniel 
Frawley, and acted by conscientious 
artists, fills a need in our theatre 
world, and is warmly welcomed. 



Orpheum's New Bill. 

A new idea holds forth next week 
at the Orpheum. Ona Munson, said 
to be one of the most beautiful girls 
on the stage, is to present a revue by 
Howard Emmett Rogers which differs 
in many ways to other acts which late- 
ly have been shown. Miss Munson ca- 
ters more to ladies in the audience than 
she does to men; instead of being sur- 
rounded by a bevy of girls, her sup- 
porting company is entirely masculine. 
The act is called "A Manly Revue," 
and it certainly has pleased audiences 
on every bill it has appeared, say ad- 
vance reports. 

LeRow Duffield, tenor of great range 
and technique ; Harry Holbrook, a bar- 
itone basso, late of the Capital Theatre 
in New York ; Joseph Miners and Wal- 
lace Clark make up the voices, while- 
two excellent young dancers, Shean 
and Phillips, work with Miss Munson 
in the numbers besides doing a spec- 
ialty themselves. 

Jean Adair will appear in a clever 
playlet, "Any Home." Billy Frawley 
and Edna Louise will offer a one act 
playlet called "Seven A. M."; Theodore 
Bekefi, formerly of the Imperial Rus- 
sian Ballet will present classical and 
character dances. He will be assisted 
by several other artists. 

Completing the rest of next week's 
Orpheum show will be Percy Bronson 
and Winnie Baldwin, Lady Tsen Mei, 
and Paul Gordon and Ame Rica, form- 
ing a quartette of acts known individ- 
ually the country over as bing widely 
representative of good vaudeville. 



Del Monte Golf 

Much interest among golfers is be- 
ing displayed in the Summer tourna- 
ment on August 12th to 14th at Del 
Monte. This event will act as a sort 
of preliminary to the championship, 
and will give the contestants an oppor- 
tunity to get in some helpful practice. 



SAtlfRAWCltCO 




! 



"*!!»" 25 and 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 

AND THE SAME GREAT SHOWS 

Smoking permitted in dress circle 



and loges 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR AUGUST 6, 1921 



17 



California 

Herman Heller reappears this week 
as leader of the California orchestra, 
and the rendition of the Second Hun- 
garian Rhapsody is a treat no one 
should miss. The harp work is par- 
ticularly good, and the reception ac- 
corded this high-class music should en- 
courage the abandonment of jazz. 



Imperial 

Beginning with the news events of 
interest from all over the world, the 
week's program at the Imperial con- 
tains a Bobby Bumps cartoon comedy; 
the popular orchestral selections under 
Severi's baton ; a Century comedy with 
a clever dog for hero ; Harry Hume's 
singing; and the "big piece" with Bebe 
Daniels in a double role, called "Two 
Weeks with Pay" giving Miss Daniels 
every opportunity to display her 
charming personality and many beau- 
tiful costumes. 



Granite Exhibit at Palace Hotel 

The annual meeting of the Granite 
Manufacturers' Association has 
brought out the fact that California 
quarries yield a far better product than 
the better-known stone, found in east- 
ern states. In its texture the Califor- 
nia granite is finer and more attrac- 
tive, and its durability far exceeds the 
ordinary stone imported from other 
parts of the United States. 

The annaul meeting of the Granite 
Manufacturers' Association of Califor- 
nia, was held this week at the Palace 
Hotel where splendid specimens of the 
local art in granite carving were ex- 
hibited and received much praise. John 
D. McGilvray of San Francisco pre- 
sided and at the opening session Super- 
visor McLaren made an address of 
welcome to the Association on behalf 
of the city. 

Amongst the many other speakers 
who addressed the Association were : 
P. D. Mullany, James Lynch, Fred Brit- 
tain, Charles Birnie of \ isalia. 



It Delights all Travelers 

Distinguished travelers stop at the 
Fairmont lintel almost every day in 
the year, ami invariably express delight 
at the magnificent view of San Fran- 
cisco which unfolds upon the windows 
of the splendid resilience place of our 
city. This week a Turkish prince is 
entertained at the Fairmont and though 
;, traveler who has circled the globe 
many times he is enthusiastic over his 
urning place as affording the most 
picturesque view of a great city he has 
ever seen. Not only is the eye of the 
distinguished stranger delighted but 
the perfect hotel service makes 1 
journ in San Francisco doubly de.'igh» 
ful. 



Specialties at Techau's 

Sometimes an Impromptu show is 
put on at the Techau Tavern, as was 
the case last week when a special after 
theatre party composed of prominent 
members of the theatrical and motion 
picture profession volunteered to do a 
few "stunts" for the guests. 

Techau Tavern is the favorite ren- 
dezvous for the player-people, and 
scarcely an evening passes that does 
not see couples on the dancing floor 
whose work on the screen or stage is 
familiar to everyone. They appreciate 
the dignity and efficiency which dis- 
tinguishes the service at Techau Tav- 
ern, as well as the congenial atmos- 
phere, the large dance floor, irresistible 
jazz of the famous orchestra, and the 
diverting novelty of the Girl Revue 
numbers. 

The special "dance wheel" feature 
is being enjoyed by all guests who 
fill the floor when the chance comes 
for a couple to win a box of Melachri- 
no Cigarettes and Gruenhagen's Choc- 
olates. 

K. of C. Convention 

The convention and parade of the 
Knights of Columbus were memorable 
demonstrations. San Francisco was 
glad to welcome the visitors in her cor- 
dial style. 



Phones Sutter 3169, Kearny 4978 

United Flower & Supply Co., Inc. 

FLORISTS 

We grow our own stock and. with ex- 
tensive nurseries to draw from, can 
give unusual values. It will pay 
you to view our flowers and 
price*. 



448 Bush Street 



San Francisco 



Eyes Guaranteed 

Bother 0*^0 Work at 
You? 27 7th St. 

DR.J.P.JUHL 



Correct 
Clothes 



Of good taste and refine- 
ment—and they hold their 
own against any compe- 
tition today, tomorrow 
and every day of the year. 
The fullest measure of 
value. 

HASTINGS 

Clothing Company 

Post Street at Kearny .•. San Francisco 



Gentlewomen— 

A trade that is of 
great importance: 

THE CARE OF THE HAIR 
THE CARE OF THE FACE 
THE CARE OF THE NAILS 

Hairdressing Marceling 
Cosgrove's Hair Store 

Kstublished 25 years 

360 Geary Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone: kearny 3842 



Berkeley Store: 2331 Telegraph Ave. 



ELECTROLYSIS 

I and moles, warts and 
superfluous hair permanently removed by 
my latest Improved multiple needle machine. 
\v..rk guaranteed. 

MADAM STIVER 

133 Geary Street. Suite 723 Whitney Building 

Phone Douglas 
Oakland, Suite 424, First Nat. Bank Building 

Phone Oukland I 




Cleaner Complete 

A Perfect Cleaner for Automobiles 

Efficient — Economical 



VAN AUTO VACUUM CLEANER 

AND GAS SAVER 

Please Note the Following Features: 

I — Keep* the car dean and sanitary. 

B twenty-five per cent In consumption of gas. 
8 — Cleans the engine by running Kerosene through 
the Vacuum Into the motor. 

x dirt and dust out of the outsid- 
in changing tires. 

luatment of air pressure easy at any 
altitude. 

FOR SALE BY ALL DEALERS 

Price Complete $15.00. Ins talled $17. 50 

Manufactured By 

VAN AUTO VACUUM COMPANY 

135 Hyde Street. San Francisco, Calif. 
Phone Prospect 132 



18 



Sunbeams 



No Influence — The young lady was taking 
the church census, and the tall young man 
with the clerical appearance had just re- 
quested her to step inside, as they had sick- 
ness in the house and he didn't like to leave 
the door ajar. Influenza prevailed in the 
neighborhood, and the young woman was 
cautious. 

"It isn't anything contagious, I hope?" she 
queried suspiciously. 

"Twins, ma'am," was the reply. 

The young lady "flu." — Film Fun. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Then the Dust Flew — The scene was an 
old country farm-yard, and the farmer's wife 
stood at the door. Down the pretty country 
lane a tramp, bedraggled and dirty, made 
his way. 



AUGUST 6, 1921 



Unreasonable — Guest — Say, waiter, how 
long must I wait for that half chicken I or- 
dered a half hour ago? 

Waiter — IJ n til somebody comes in and or- 
ders the other half. We can't go out and 
kill a half chicken. — Boston Globe. 



Still Appropriate — "This article says that 
the red-and-white-striped barbers' poles we 
see are a survival of the time when barbers 
were also surgeons. When a man had to be 
bled he came to a barber." 

"That so? Well, I'm not surprised that 
the barbers still retain them." 

— Boston Transcript. 



No Sale — "Could I sell you Boswell's 'Life 
of Johnson,' sir?" asked the book agent. 

"Certainly not," replied the self-made mil- 
lionaire. "I'm not interested in the career 
of colored pugilists." — Birmingham Age-Her- 
ald. 



What He Was Looking For — "I do wish, 
Harold," said Mrs. Comely, "that you would 
not stare at other women so much. It's very 
rude and is certainly no compliment to me. 

"On the contrary, my dear," replied the 
resourceful benedict, "I was looking to see 
if I could find a prettier face than yours and 
I confess I really cannot." 



Twice Guilty — "Did the traffic cop arrest 



ycu : 



"Twice," replied Mr. Chuggins. "When I 
couldn't stop he arrested me for speeding, 
and when I finally stopped and couldn't start, 
he arrested me for blocking traffic. — Wash- 
ington Star. 



At the farm-yard gate he stopped and be- 
sought the farmer's wife to give him some- 
thing to eat to appease his hunger. 

"Come right into the yard," said she, cor- 
dially. 

The tramp eyed the bull dog that was rov- 
ing round the yard. The bulldog eyed him. 

"Come right in," repeated the farmer's 
wife. 

"I dunno about that," answered the 
tramp. "How 'bout the dog? Will he bite?" 

"I don't know," said the farmer's wife. 
"I only got him today, and that's what I 
want to find out." — Pittsburg Chronicle-Tele- 
graph. 



Obligatory — North — The bible says man 
was made to labor. 

West — You bet he was! No one ever did 
it voluntarily. 



Enough's Enough — "Say," called out the 
Kansas housewife, "ain't you the same man 
I gave a mince pie to last Thanksgiving?" 
"No, hum, I'm not," returned the weary one, 
as he sidled out the gate; "and what's more, 
the doctors say I never will be again." — 
Judge. 



If We Knew 

Could we but draw the curtains 

That surround each other's lives. 
See the naked heart and spirit. 

Know what spur the action gives. 
Often we should find it better. 

Purer than we judge we should; 
We should judge each others' errors 

If we only understood. 

Cculd we judge all deeds by motives. 

See the good and bad within. 
Often we should love the sinner. 

All the while we loathe the sin; 
Could we know the powers working 

To o'erthrow Integrity, 
We should love each other better 

With more patient charily. 

If we knew the cares and trials. 

Knew the efforts all in vain. 
And the bitter disappointment. 

Understood the loss and gain — 
Would the grim, eternal roughness 

Seem. I wonder, just the same? 
Should we help where now we hinder? 

Should we pity where we blame? 

Oh. we judge each other harshly. 

Knowing not life's hidden force; 
Knowing not the fount of action 

Is less turbid at its source. 
Seeing not amid the evil 

All the golden grains of good — 
Oh. we'd love each other better 

If we only understood. 



BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old Poodle Dog 

Luncheon 75c 

Served Daily— 11 to 2 

■ !hoose full-sized portions from large menu, 

which is changed every day 

Excellent Food — Beautiful Environment 

Prompt Service 

French Dinner $1.50 

Including tax, week days and Sundays, 
5 to 9 p. m. 

DANCING 

-121 HUSH STREET, Above Kearny 
Phone: Douglas 2411 



Open Even Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m, 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

65 Post Street, Near Market Street 
Phone Kearny 4536 San Francisco, Calif. 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 
French and Italian Dinners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



For that stubborn cough use 
Old Snake Doctor's Cough Remedy 

SNAKE DRUG CO. 

Formerly G. Leipnitz & Co. 

Now Located -it 
127-129 KEARNY STREET 



PENINSULAR PA T RON A <;!•; Si '1,11 'IT 101 > 

Post-Taylor Garage, Inc. 

530 TAYLOR STREET 



Washing and Greasing Cars in a 
careful and efficient manner 



"The /louse of Quality' 

GOLDEN GATE DAIRY LUNCH 

Block X McDonald, Props. 

SERVICE SUPREME HOME COOKING 

172 EDDY STREET 

Visit them after the show and meal times 

i n. es Reasonable 



§>m\ iFranrtsro (Etjromrl? 



Leading Newspaper of the Pacific Coast 



A Newspaper made every day 

TO SPEAK TO 

Every me mb er o f every fami ly 

Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for $1.15 a month- 
including Sunday editions 

Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postmaster 



R3! 







Unconditionally 

Guaranteed 

l&Montiis 



SERVICE 

for all makes of 

STORAGE 

BATTERIES 

Bringyourbattery 
problems here. 



The "J-E" Battery has the strongest guar- 
antee of ANY battery on the market. There 
are no "ifs," "buts," or provisos .At the end 
of 18 months it must be 100% efficient— as 
good as the day you bought it, and — You Are 
The Judge. Your "J-E" Battery must make 
good for you, or we will. 
Works just like any ordinary battery — has 
more power — more pep — never needs filling or 
refilling — costs no more than any first-class 
battery — lasts longer. 



J-E Battery Co. 

of the Pacific Coast 

1220 Post St., San Francisco 

Phone Franklin 664 



°lh 



6* 



'sea 




Battery 

Requires no Water 




J. B. CROWE 

3652 GEARY, at 1st Ave. 1055 Post St., at Polk 

PHONE FRANKLIN 7445 

AUTOMOBILE r"l„„„ ^L Jl\ If' J„ GLAZING 
BUILDING UlaSS 01 311 KindS BEVELING 



Spend Your Vacation 

IX THE 

BEAUTIFUL FEATHER RIVER COUNTRY 

THOUSANDS OF vi EL OF THE si:a in' Tin: 

HEART OF Tin: sn: 
Reached via 

WESTERN PACIFIC RAILROAD 

"The Feather River Route" 

Numerous Resorts along the famous FEATHER RIVER and near the 

many lakes and streams where fish and game are abundant 

Jl 'rile for Illustrated I : ciders 

Ticket Offices: 50 POST STREET and FERRY BUILDING— Telephone Sutter 1651 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANV 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Company in America" 
FIRE, AUTOMOBILE, WINDSTORM. 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 

LIBERAL CON 1KAC.TS REASONABLE RATES 



PYRO-VOID 

Dr. Hoagland's Home Treatment 
...for... 

PYORRHEA 

Package with full directions sent 

in plain wrapper for One Dollar 

Satisfaction Guaranteed or Money Refunded 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 
Dental Specialist 

908 Market Street, at Powell 

San Francisco 

Dept. N. L. Established 1903 

SAVE YOUR TEETH 



An Ounce of Prevention Is 
Worth Many Pounds of 
Ten - mile - from - no- 
where - regret 

Let our expert automobile 
electricians inspect your 
starting, lighting and igni- 
tion systems regularly. It's 
the best insurance against a 
breakdown at an important 
moment. 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 

MASTER AUTOMOBILE 
ELECTRICIANS 

955 Post Street SAN FRANCISCO 



CYCOL 

MOTOR OIL 



jfie 

MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

"SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
thenewHEXEON - 
process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

San Francisco 



V I N O B A R ! 

THE BRICK WITH THE KICK 

Make Your Own — It Is Simple 
"inegar 

VIN0BAR MFG. CO., San FrancUco 

536-38 WASHINGTON STREET 



A 

Keaton Non-Skid 




Cord Record 






"TT may be of interest to you to 
learn that the two Keaton Non- 
Skid Cord tires were in service on 
the rear wheels of my Seven- 
Passenger Case Car for approxi- 
mately 13,000 miles, after which 
time they were placed on the front 
wheels and run approximately 7000 
miles, giving a total service each of 
20,000 miles. 

"These cord tires also gave prac- 
tically 8000 miles of efficient non- 
skid protection. " 

(Signed) Hough's AuTO SERVICE 
JUNE 28, 1921 Per F. F. HOUGH 




Kea 

SA 
LOS ANGELI 


ton Tire & Rubber 

lN FRANCISCO: 636 Van Ness Avenue, Phone Prospect 3. 
OAKLAND: 2811 Broadway, Phone Lakeside 126 

:S PORTLAND 


Co. 

24 

SEATTLE 



lyff*- 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



SATURDAY, AUGUST 13, 1921 

■■■■■■■■■■■■■^■1 



$5.00 PER YEAR 

■■■■■■■■MM 











C/?A55 HUGS 

TRADE MARK RFC. U.S. PAT OFF. 



The natural simplicity of CREX 
grass rugs, combined with their artistic 
beauty, imparts an atmosphere of re- 
finement and good taste. They are the 
il. inexpensive floor covering for 
am room in town or country. 



Their adaptability and practicability 
for use the year 'n mnd is best evidenced 
by the increasing demand in all seasons. 
For living-room, dining-room, bedroom, 
parlor and porch, von will find them 
ideal. 



CREX grass rugs are made in three weaves, DeLuxe. Herringbone and Imperial, in a wide divergenc 
Don't be deceived by imitations. Insist upon the genuine — they'll satisfy. 



Handsomely Illustrated Color C.ulalog with full Description Mailed on 

Request 

CREX CARPET CO., 212 Fifth Ave., New York 



INSIST ON BEING SHO- THE OEMUIH 



THE IDEAL FLOOR COV- 
ERING IN TOWN AND 
COUNTRY ALLYEAR ROUND 



WIT H NAME W C" 7 - 




RESPONSIBILITY 

From the quarry 
where the rough gran- 
ite is hewn, through 
the processes of drill- 
ing, cutting, sawing, 
carving and polishing, 
to the final assembly 
and fahrication into 
the Memorial, one 
organization demon- 
-tratcs by consistent 
success the value of 
this single responsi- 
bility for design. 
manufacture and in- 
stallatii o. 

( Ine standard, chere- 
i in gi ■ ems the de- 
sign and manufacture 
of the materials as 
well as the engineer- 
ing and construction 
service. 

Booklet 'DN' on Memo- 
rials, sent on request 



Raymond Granite Company, Inc. 

CONTRACTORS 

GRANITE— STONE— BUILDING— MEMORIAL 
3 Potrero Avenue, San Francisco 1350 Palmetto Street, Los Angeles 




SS^sr 



Go anywhere 

with a "*T- E" Battery 



m 



SERVICE 

for all makes of 

STORAGE 
BATTERIES 

Bringyourbattery 
problems here. 



Go as far as you like from battery- 
service stations" because your 
"J-E" needs no water and no at- 
tention. 

Your "J-E" Battery will not run 
down when not in use. 

Install a "J-E" Battery TODAY for 
the long trips or the short trips. Then 
Forget It. 



"J-E" BATTERY COMPANY of the Pacific Coast 

1220 Post Street SAN FRANCISCO Franklin 664 



^ 



6* 



sea. 




99 

Battery 

Requires no Water 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Company in America" 

FIRE, AUTOMOBILE. WINDSTORM. 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 

LIBERAL CONTRACTS REASONABLE RATES 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



PYRO-VOID 

Dr.Hoagland's Home Treatment 



for... 



PYORRHEA 

Package with full directions sent 

in plain wrapper for One Dollar 

Satisfaction Guaranteed or Money Refunded 



DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

Dental Specialist 

908 Market Street, at Powell 

San Francisco 

Dept. N. L. Established 1903 

SAVE YOUR TEETH 



An Ounce of Prevention Is 
Worth Many Pounds of 
Ten - mile - from - no- 
where - regret 

Let our expert automobile 
electricians inspect your 
starting, lighting and igni- 
tion systems regularly. It's 
the best insurance against a 
breakdown at an important 
moment. 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 

MASTER AUTOMOBILE 
ELECTRICIANS 

955 Post Street SAN FRANCISCO 




MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
the new HEXEON - 
process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

San Francisco 



V I N BAR ! 


THE BRICK WITH THE KICK 

Make Your Own — It Is Simple 

Guaranteed not to make Vinegar 

VINOBAR MFG. CO., San Francisco 

536-38 WASHINGTON STREET 

Agents Wanted 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1850 

Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




VOL. XCIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, AUGUST 13, 1921 



No 32 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 3S2 Russ Building, Bush and Montgomery Streets. 
San Francisco, Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco. 
Calif., Post Office as second-class mail matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates {including postage): One year $5.00. Foreign, One 
year. $6.00; Canada, one year. $6.00. 

NOTICE — The Neivs Letter does not solicit fiction and will not be 
responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 



Now there's a lemon slump. What's the good of cheap 

lemons with nothing to flavor? 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

France is going to sell superfluous ships. Anybody can 

buy an ocean liner or two this winter for firewood. 
•j. »j. ♦> 

It is not the labor trust, alone, but dishonest combina- 
tions of the labor trust and other trusts that have kept our 
fine city back. + # + 

The exclusion of American boys from Apprenticeship 

in remunerative trades, is a great crime. The Open Shop 
will prevent it. <. 4. 4 

"Woodrow Wilson's 

vaudeville stage. Wise 
armor under his coat. 



Double" announces he has the 
resolution except he has chain 



* * * 

While the building industry has been stagnant in San 

Francisco for years, Los Angeles has been extending by 
leaps and bounds. Why ? 

* * + 

Northcliffe has told the Canadians that booze is easy to 

get in the United States and very bad. Nol being crazy lie 

prefers John Hull's method. 

+ * * 
Why doesn't our Real Estate Board advocate better 

transportation down the Peninsular? It would mean more 
business for Montgomery Street. 

* * * 

All the building trades strikers are away picking fruit 

at 30 cents an hour, sooner than accept 90 cents in San 

Francisco. Every man to his taste. 
+ + + 

Forbes, financial writer for Hearst newspapers won- 
ders why bankers are so unpopular. Because yellow news- 
papers hammer them so much Mr. Forbes. 

* * * 

In Los Angeles, four miles from the business centre. 

stores pay more rent than on our Market street between 
Seventh and Eighth Streets. Explanation. The Open Shop. 

* * + 

The national Society of Chiropodists assert. San Fran- 
cisco ladies arc all t indcrcllas. Who are all the Other 
women we see with slippers like shoe-boxes? Oaklanders 



The average British boozer is quite chesty over the 

additional hour a day for loading up. " 'Ere's to Uncle 
Sam's Rooshia!" he chuckles as he blows the foam off his 

beer. + + «, 

Did you ever stop to think that the vacant lots on Mar- 
ket Street, west of Eighth are all owned by unprogressive 
heirs of large estates who use their property for poster 
fences? 4 + + 

Mr. Althol McBean is a young business man who has 

no frigidity of the feet when it comes to declaring that the 
Open Shop — American plan, is essential industrially and pa- 
triotically. ^ + + 

The Open Shop is not to bar union men. Its principle 

is to open shop doors to all men, union members or other- 
wise, and remove barriers against American boys learning 
useful trades. * * * 

Did you realize that San Francisco never has had more 

than a local boom. Now for the first time the Hood of im- 
migration is rolling here. Will we stop it by maintaining 
the labor trust ? + + + 

The $59,000 San Francisco bank thief lias been arrest- 
ed in Montreal and strange to say not a word in the sensa- 
tional press about low wages making "honest young men, 
dirty crooks." + + + 

The reason why realty owners in San Francisco arc 

powerless to withstand the taxeaters is. that the men of 
large Capital do not buy land, and seem to have no interest 
in their city government. 

+ + + 
What a shame it is. that the splendid building lot, cor- 
ner of Market and Eighth Street, is to be used as an open 
ramshackle free market. It should have a line building. 

But few millionaires in San Francisco think of building. 
Why? t + + 

With its incomparable harbor as an asset, which makes 

San Francisco potentially superior to all others on the 
Pacific Coast, it is lamentable that we allow it to remain 
little more than part of a political machine managed from 
Sacramento. + + + 

If. the late William F. McCoombs was the Warwick 

who made Woodrow Wilson I 'resident, as the Examiner 
asserts, it must be comforting to his relatives that he pass- 
ed away before his confession of guilt is published in serial 

installments. 

+ + + 

In Serbia there is a popular belief among the peasants 

that the devil likes lean babies and that dirty babies inherit 
the Kingdom of Heaven. Blessed be they that are unclean 
for thev shall inherit. Apparently that very belief IS indul- 
ged in by others than the Serbians and Heaven must be a 
much crowded place. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 




GOMPCK 



The State is warned of a great 
Los Angeles Hogging It danger by the avidity of Los 
Angeles to build itself up, indus- 
trially, at ruinous expense of the taxpayers, and by unfair 
methods. In a few expressive, if not elegant words, Los 
Angeles proposes to "hog it all", in the matter of grabbing 
available sources of hydro-electric development. 

Every one knows how Los Angeles has gerrymandered 
the County of Los Angeles, so that the city rambles over 
most of it. With that artificial extension, has come in- 
crease in population which enables the southern boomers 
to advertise to the world, that their metropolis is the most 
populous city in California. Technically, that appears to 
be the truth, though it needs considerable explanation to 
make it the exact and honest truth. 

Now. having established its status as first in popula- 
tion, Los Angeles is moving, swiftly, to make itself first 
in the industrial growth of the Pacific Coast. Several times 
has the News Letter called the latter fact to the attention 
of our easy-going public men of San Francisco, who have 
slept at the switch while the boomers of the "Citrus Belt" 
have been working feverishly to make up for the natural 
deficiencies of their city with its harbor, originally, only 
sixty feet wide. 

San Francisco with its magnificent bay. capable of 
receiving all the navies of Europe, has laughed at the pre- 
tension of Los Angeles, that its slough at San Pedro could 
be converted into a port of commerce by the construction 
of a sea-wall ; but Los Angeles now proclaims that the mira- 
cle has been accomplished 

The boom city is advertising to the world its possession 
of all that go to constitute a great industrial community — 
large population, perfect climate, cheap motive power and 
a convenient harbor, for exports and imports. 

The cheap power to which Los Angeles alludes, its 
hydro-electric current, and the scheme to acquire that 
power at the cost of the State, is at once the most audacious 
and unscrupulous that California has ever had brought to its 
astonished notice. State Senator Rominger is giving the 
impudent scheme an airing which will certainly cause its 
defeat. 

An amendment to the State Constitution is necessary to 
the furtherance of the project of granting Los Angeles a 
monopoly of the industrial prosperity on the Pacific Coast. 
The so-called "League of Municipalities", Senator Rom- 
inger says, is "foisting the scheme." which includes the cre- 
ation of a Water and Power Board with authority to con- 
trol and expend $500,000,000. With such a vast sum in its 
control the Board could not fail to become a super-govern- 
ment in California, spending money at a rate which would 
make the present extravagance paltry. 

The city of Los Angeles would dominate the Water 
and Power Board with an executive officer drawing a sal- 
ary of $5,000.00 a year larger than the Governor of the 
State. The bonds issued by the proposed Water and Power 
Board would become a lien on every foot of land in Califor- 
nia. 

The city of Los Angeles, by means of cheap hydro- 
electric power, sold at lower than equitable rates could 
subsidize factories and attract to itself industries that 
otherwise would settle in various parts of the State. Sen- 
ator Rominger calls attention to the Goodyear plant, "orig- 
inally planned for Oakland but located in Los Angeles under 
such subsidy". 

The haste of Los Angeles in filing upon desirable hy- 
dro-electric sources indicates that the city does not intend 




to deal upon an equitable basis with other political sub- 
divisions of the State. 

Los Angeles has filed upon 500,000 horsepower on the 
Colorado River, and announce that it was the deliberate 
intention to file in advance of all other applicants, be they 
municipal or otherwise." On both slopes of the high Sier- 
ras, even as far north as Hetch Hetchy, the Los Angeles 
schemers have filed while they have done nothing to de- 
velop the 250,000 horsepower energy of their own aqueduct. 

It is suggested by Senator Rominger that Los Angeles 
should be placed under control of the State Railroad Com- 
mission, so that rates charged by its municipality could 
not be used as a bribe to consolidate the industries of the 
State within its gerrymandered bounds, after it has seized 
upon every available source of hydro-electric energy. 

It is to be hoped our local press will not allow this 
important matter to be crowded out of its columns by the 
trivial subjects to which far too much attention is devoted, 
like Nero's fiddling while Rome burned. 



Upper New York City, the tip 
Judge Advocates Flogging of Manhattan, known locally 

as the "bronx" or more cor- 
rectly, the Bronx, is having a "baby" crime wave. The chil- 
dren have formed themselves into an organization for pil- 
fering. One such gang snatches pocket books and runs 
away with them. Magistrate Max Levine in sentencing 
some of the offenders to the care of the Children's Society 
said some steps should lie taken to stop this form of crime. 
He lavs the tendency in the children to the gossipping and 
idle habits of the mothers and to the fact that the fathers 
are busy all day earning a living. He suggested that the 
use of the cat-o'-nine-tails be resumed. He did not say, 
however, whether the cat should be used on the children, 
the mothers or the fathers. 

There is a good deal said these days about the efficacy 
of flogging for incorrigible criminals. By the theoretical 
altruists it is announced as infamous. Experienced jurists 
and thief-catchers however attach great value to the use 
of the Cat-O'-nine-tails on the backs of chronic offenders. 
Something must be done to make the laws more effective. 
William Pinkerton the famous detective is an earnest ad- 
vocate of the whip. 

In England the subject has been threshed out and the 
conclusion arrived at that flogging is indispensable in the 
punishment of certain types of particularly vicious offen- 
ders. In Liverpool which was afflicted by intolerable ruf- 
fianism the lash was tried with the most satisfactorv re- 
sults. The crimes of violence were rapidly diminished and 
truculent rascals evinced a terror of the whip when sen- 
tenced, which showed how much flogging was feared. In 
London also certain types of scoundrels have been syste- 
matically flogged and the effects of the punishment care- 
fully noted. Most English criminologists have great faith 
in the salutary effects of flogging. 

However useful it may be in suppressing ruffianism in 
the United States it cannot be tried wherever judges are 
elected. No judge would dare to sentence a brutal robber 
to l'e flogged for at the next election every rascal and every 
sentimentalist would vote against him. In England which 
has an admirable judicial system no judge is elected. All 
English judges hold their positions independent of polities, 
and that is why the English courts have so much respect 
and power. We could copy the English judicial system 
with great profit to ourselves and a vast saving of money. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR AUGUST 13, 1921 



Eastern newspapers that 
More of the Turlock Affair have commented on the ex- 
pulsion of Japanese melon 
pickers from Turlock are not favorable to the white agita- 
tors who created the disturbance. The New York World 
has reached its conclusions from the impartial and full 
account of the lawlessness published in the San Francisco 
Chronicle. 

"Those facts are illuminating," says the World. It im- 
pressed the World to learn that the Turlock fruit growers 
"were so incensed over the action of the mob that they 
were determined to let the melons rot on the vines rather 
than hire migratory white workers believed to have been 
implicated in the evictions. To the merchants and business 
men of Turlock it was a serious situation because they 
were almost wdiolly dependent upon the marketing of the 
ranchers' crops." 

The World has reached the general conclusion in the 
Eastern States that the Japanese who were driven out "are 
more desirable than the men who forced them to go." 

The World adds : "Turlock is merely paying the penal- 
ty of having shared in the general agitation against the 
Japanese throughout California. It has been deeply wound- 
ed in its pocket at the most critical season of the year and 
is grief-stricken over the disappearing prospects of an ex- 
ceptionally profitable crop. The fault is not with the Jap- 
anese workers who are described as industrious, efficient 
and peaceful. On the contrary, the fruit-growers assert 
that "most of the seasonal workers, who are members of 
the Fruit and Vegetable Workers Union, whose President, 
active as an anti-Japanese agitator, has been arrested, are 
lazy and unreliable." 

None of the Eastern commentators calls atcntion to the 
important fact that the anti-Japanse agitation in Califor- 
nia was started as a political move to re-elect James D. 
Phelan to the United States Senate. That is really the 
most important phase of the quarrel forced on industrious 
foreign workers, who have proved themselves almost inde- 
spensible to the orchard interests in California. That a 
politically ambitious citizen possessed of inherited wealth, 
could create a campaign slogan, capable of causing serious 
friction with a powerful and friendly nation and promoting 
lawlessness in his own state is a subject for serious thought. 
First of all, there is the selfish dishonesty of the purpose. 
Next there is the utter lack of upright public spirit and the 
scandalous disinterest in the results, such as have been 
shown at Turlock. 

* * * 

The building trades' un- 
San Francisco's Great Handicap ions in San Francisco 

have refused to accept 
the American Plan. They are still out on strike. Work, 
however, is going on all about us and this refusal on the 
part of McCarthy's lambs to labor does not materially 
affect the situation. Gradually, every job large anil small 
will be manned. Good progress is being made on most of 

the big structure- and the city is industrially free. Oakland 
labor unions have accepted the situation and that city is 
industrially humming. The unions in San Francisco have 
indicted an economic loss on the whole city by their be- 
havior in this matter. They officially agreed to accept the 
verdict of a board of arbitration. When the award was 
made they refused to keep their promise. Later they re- 
versed this position and decided to accept this award. Now. 
they have again refused. McCarthy has just been elected 
again to the presidency of the Building Trades Council on 
tiie old plea that he was opposed for that office by the 
Chamber of t ommerce. 

With his unions McCarthy's assertion goes a- Gospel. 
And so. they voted for him. Another false statement made 
bj the strikers is that they are refusing to work because 
they want to e-tablish "collective bargaining" The inti- 
mation is that the American Plan forbids such a thin, 
bargaining collectively. One of the main principles upon 



which the American Plan is built is collective bargaining 
and the right to any to practice it. The unions have not 
brought any particular help to San Francisco by the strike. 
They have retarded prosperity's coming. And, by striking. 
they have again affirmed to the world that San Francisco 
is a city of industrial unrest. That kind of a reputation, 
once firmly established abroad, will go far to undermine 
and destroy the supremacy we now enjoy as the center of 
finance for the West. The labor unions have been the 
greatest element in retarding our industrial expansion in 
the past. The American Plan has been adopted not to fight 
the unions but to prevent the unions from doing us further 
harm in the future. 

* * * 

The Indian Govern- 
Indian Visit of Prince of Wales ment considers it impor- 
tant that the Prince of 
Wales shall visit India this year. It is hoped that the splen- 
did receptions the native Indian princes will accord the heir 
of the British crown shall have a quieting effect on the 
agitating Nationalists, headed by Ghandi. Last year the 
Duke of Connaught was sent to India to open the new form 
of "Parliament" but his visit failed to arouse popular en- 
thusiasm. In the Indian way he was boycotted. Streets 
were deserted and shops closed in Bombay when he arrived 
and similarly when he departed. 

The Prince of Wales is expected to be more fortunate 
in his diplomatic mission. He is preparing for the important 
visit. Word has gone out asking the press and public to 
give him rest when he appears in public — not to photograph 
him so much, not to publish his whereabouts if he slips 
away for a day or two in the country, and, generally, to 
treat him as though he is not the heir to the British crown. 

* * * 

England still has large for- 
British Foreign Investments eign holdings, though many 

bankers in the United States 
believed that most of such investments were called home 
during the war or were so collected and segregated in 
other countries as collateral for war loans that the total 
available has been cut down comparatively to a small total. 
The war has greatly changed the character and size of these 
investments, but, according to facts brought out at the 
Summer meeting of the British Institute of Bankers, pres- 
ent investments abroad still amount to about $ 1 5 ,000,000, 
000. 

Before the war. the aggregate of British foreign in- 
vestments was $20,000,000,000. The principal changes in 
these investments since 1913 arc the sale of the bulk of 
American holdings and a large proportion of Canadian ami 
lapancse stocks and a small percentage of South American 
properties. On the other hand, whereas in 1913 the foreign 
holdings of the British securities were negligible. England 
now owes about $5,500,000,000 to the United States. 
+ + + 

The mad Mullah of Somaliland is 
More Lives Than a Cat reported to lie dead at last. He 
has as many lives as a cat. The 
European newspapers were forever announcing his de- 
parture from the scenes of his many troubles with the 
P.ritish. but no sooner was his death confirmed than he 
appeared on the warpath with a new force of Moham- 
medans. 

His tactics consisted in marching towards the coast 
when the infidel enemy were not expecting him. If the 
British appeared in force, the Mullah and his turbani 
lowers returned to the African desert. 

But the aeroplane made an end to his raids. The air- 
men were able to detect his advance and to attack him. 
His st,,ne forts were DO protection from bombs dropped 
from the sky. In the Mullah's last raid the airmen followed 
him into the desert, and actually set his clothes on fire. 
From the Abyssinian border conns the inns that he is 
no more of this earth. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Famous Socialist Failures 

By HARVY BROUGHAM 



As the Russian Communists are nearing the end of their 
power, the world has been shown for the fourth time that 
communisation of worldly goods and socialization of the 
means of production, are impracticable dreams of revolu- 
tionists, who expect to establish perfect civilization by class 
warfare and the spoliation of capitalists. 

The first of the four famous communistic attempts to 
outlaw capitalism in Europe, was the religious revival 
known as the Anabaptist movement, which began in Jan- 
uary 1525 and ended in June 1536. The essence of the 
movement was socialism. All things were to be held in 
common. Passive resistance was to be the rule of life 
and salvation was to be the guaranteed reward of all those 
who entered the ranks of the elect. Five years after the 
commencement of the movement, there were already five 
different varieties of the doctrine. Disciples were prom- 
ised a life free from all restraint, in which every kind of 
indulgence was lawful. The elect could commit no crime 
and therefore it mattered not what crimes they commit- 

The New Jerusalem 

The town of Munster, Westphalia,was chosen as the New 
Jerusalem of the Anabaptist sect and John of Leyden the 
principal prophet was made ruler. 

Finding his ground firm, the prophet proclaimed himself 
"King" and appointed twelve "Dukes" to assist him. 
Therein he established a principle which has been loyally 
followed by later communists, who no sooner organize 
for universal equality, than they create inequality of the 
rulers and ruled, and enforce the violation by ruthless 

'" Anabaptist Tyranny 

The King of the Anabaptists and his twelve Dukes estab- 
lished an arbitrary court which ordered the execution of 
such communists as proved troublesome to the rulers. 
Privacy of life was abolished and polygamy established 
compulsory, the king himself having fifteen wives. 

The^ ending of the madness was like that of all com- 
munes — full of the horrors of famine and murder. The 
town of Munster was captured and turned over to the vic- 
tors for plunder and bloodshed. The King was dragged 
from his hiding place, tortured and slain with all the cru- 
elty possible. So ended the first modern attempt to replace 
European civilization by communism. 

Liberty, Equality, Fraternity. 

The second famous demonstration of communism in 
action was given by the Jacobins in the French revolution 
of 1793, which followed the reign of Louis XVI and Marie 
Antoinette. The watchword of the Jacobins was the 
famous motto, "Liberty, Equality and Fraternity", but they 
regarded none of their professions and performed none of 
their promises. The Social Democratic Commune which 
inaugurated the Reign of Terror in France, was a self- 
selected oligarchy, created without the sanction of any 
popular vote but which throughout its whole existence, 
notoriously represented only a minority of the People of 
Paris and an insignificant minority of the people of France. 
The goods and lands of the rich were to be divided among 
the proletariat and the principle of Liberty, Equality and 
Fraternity be forever established. The Jacobin commun- 
ists began by murdering their untried prisoners. 

Murder and Cannibalism. 

The prisons being filled to overflowing a gang of 300 
communists undertook the task of butchering the captive 
capitalists, nobles, priests and literary people. At each 
prison a district tribunal of communists was set up. The 



prisoners were severally called by name before the tribunal 
and their cases decided in a few minutes. Those were to 
be murdered were ordered to be removed to another prison 
"to be released." No sooner had they reached the outer 
gate than they were met by a forest of pikes and sabres. 
The victims were hewn to pieces. The Princess de Lam- 
balle was among the number. Her head was struck off 
and her body stripped and disemboweled. A communist 
boasted of having cooked and eaten one of the breasts of 
the Princess. About twelve hundred persons in all were 
thus butchered. There is no doubt that the principal actors 
in the wholesale murders were under the orders of the 

The Guillotine Set Going. 

The next step of the Paris Communists of 1793 was to 
make the tyranny of their minority rule more secure by 
eliminating their political opponents the Girondists who 
were sincere Republicans opposed to "direct measures." 
The guillotine made short work of the Girondists, famous 
among whom was that Madame Roland, whose cry on the 
steps of the sinister instrument of death, "O Liberty, what 
crimes are committed in thy name!" shall echo through 
history as long as it will be read. 

While thousands of French men and women were being 
hurried to execution by the rulers of the Commune, or 
driven into exile, the Parliament put into effect similar 
legislation to that which has ruined Russia under the So- 
viet. Prices were regulated by law with the disastrous 
results which always attend that Socialistic proceeding. 
The Bourse was closed and paper money was issued, but 
the proletariat failed to become richer. There was more 
money in circulation but it took 5000 paper francs to buy a 
pair of boots, as it now takes thousands of Lenine's paper 
rubles to buy a pound of butter. The confiscation of the 
property and lands of capitalists and nobles went on, but 
the plunder fell into the hands of the Government grafters 
who made large fortunes. The property of the Church was 
confiscated, but that failed to improve matters for the 
"common people". The army and navy were robbed of 
discipline and paid irregularly. Officers were elected by 
their batalions and offenses tried by juries of soldiers. In 
the two years in which the Commune of Paris was the most 
powerful executive body in France, the nation had been 
reduced to a condition comparable only with that of Russia 
disorganized and famine-stricken under the Soviet. The 
genius of Napoleon reorganized France. What will restore 
Russia to its place as a potential power of the first magni- 

Third Communist Failure. 

The third famous demonstration of the destructive and 
tyrannous tendencies of Socialism in governmental power, 
was given by the Paris Commune of 1871. France lay 
bleeding and exhausted after a series of terrible defeats 
by Germany. The gates of Paris, closed during the long 
siege had been reopened after the capitulation, but the 
Prussians were still within a few miles of the city and the 
win ile of the north and east of France was occupied by the 
invader. This was the moment chosen by the Social Dem- 
ocratic party to proclaim the government of the Commune 
in Paris. On March 18 the Commune was proclaimed in 
Paris. On May 22 it was blotted out in blood and flame by 
the French troops. During its brief existence it was an 
instructive object lesson of the sort Lenine has been teach- 
ing civilization in his country so full of the horrors of war, 
tyranny and famine. 

The first and most powerful Executive of the first Paris 
Commune, the Central Committee was a self constituted 
body created without any reference to the popular will. 
Having first constituted itself, the Paris Commune pro- 
ceeded to hold an election to validate its self-conferred 
authority. The National Guard were called out and sta- 
tioned at voting places to intimidate "reactionaries". None 
(Continued on page 9) 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR AUGUST 13, 1921 



Chronic Reformers Vicious 



A MAN who is always painfully good is likely to be 
at heart bad. One who is abnormally kind to ani- 
mals may be revealing in his exaggerated kindness a 
repressed desire to torture them. One who is forever 
looking after the moral welfare of others, and trying to 
make sure they commit no sins, is himself likely to have a 
mind which would not bear public inspection. 

Such are the conclusions of Dr. A. A. Brill, a well known 
psychopatrist and a leader in his specialty of wind analysis. 

This psychology of contrasts, plus crowd psychology, 
Dr. Brill believes, is the explanation of prohibition, blue 
laws and reform waves. He disapproves all these from 
the standpoint of a psychologist and physician. He sup- 
ports his views by citing cases from his own medical expe- 
rience, and to his first-hand knowledge he has added a 
formidable collection of news items, clipped from day to 
day, containing dramatic exemplifications of his beliefs. 

* * * 

"It can be set down as almost a certainty," says Dr. 
Brill, "that the abnormally good person, the self-righteous 
person, is pursuing virtue so madly because, instinctively or 
unconsciously, he is the reverse of good. He is constantly 
imbued with the feeling of sin, and in self-protection he 
throws his tendencies to evil in the opposite path, which is 
all very well if he does not go too far with it. I am com- 
pelled to look with suspicion on any one other than those 
trained for some definite religious calling, who devotes 
over-much study to religion. It is an indication that he is 
conscious of great sin in himself. 

* * * 

"And as to the man or woman who is trying to reform 
everybody else — look out ! Not only is it almost perfect 
proof that he is unhealthily anxious to do the same things 
that he seeks to prevent others from doing — it shows traces 
of other ugly traces as well. The man who sees evil in 
pictures of nudes, who is distressed by every reference to 
sex in books and on the stage, and who rails at short skirts 
and skanty bathing suits, is showing a decided trend toward 
ponophilia — the love of the libidinous. The man who is 
constantly finding indecency in people and things about him 
is convicting himself of perversion, If lie were not strongly 
attracted by the unclean, for the very sake of unclcanli- 
ness itself, he would notice little of the things that now 
shock him. I have been much interested to learn that 
two conspicuous professional reformers have large collec- 
tions of obscene pictures, to which they are adding con- 
stantly, and which they exhibit occasionally to those they 
think sufficiently pure in heart not to he harmed. That 
seems to me strikingly significant, 

* * * 

Dr. Brill has devoted much attention in the past few 
years — before prohibition and since— to alcoholism. Al- 
though he is almost a teetotaler himself, his conclusions are 

far away from those professed by the prohibitionists, lb' 

says his opinion is that alcohol is not nearly the demon it 
has been painted, but. on the contrary, is actually a 
good thing — even for most of those who apparently have 
been ruined by it. 

"Prohibition is not likely ever to he enforced." said Dr 
I '.rill, because of alcoholic drinks answei too deep a w 

human beings. But if it should be enforced, people would 
be driven to substitutes, and in general these substitutes 
would he worse than alcohol, 

"My familiarity with thi i hundreds of alcoholics. 

both in hospitals and in private practice, has convinced me 
that practically all individuals who chronically drink to 
excess are defective the} arc emotionally and mentally 
more or 1, not mean that a psycopathic 

examination would reveal them all to be mentally deficient, 
though many of them are: but. judged by the standard of 
continuous effort, they arc below normal. 



"Some cases of chronic excessive alcoholism I have been 
able to cure by psychoanalytical methods. Bu1 here is the 
astonishing part — since their cure their behavior has been 
such that their relatives and physicians regret that they 
are not still alcoholics. They all possessed a deep-seated 
instability of character, which expressed itself before their 
cure in excessive alcoholic indulgence After the drink habit 
had been broken, there still came the nervous explosions 
which previously had been absorbed comparatively harm- 
less in drinking, and they found other and more damaging 
outlets. One woman, of good family and fine education, 
resorted to other indigencies which brought her disgrace 
and her family shame. In addition she became the prey of 
fits of depression in which she frequently spoke of suicide. 
Another patient, a man of brilliance and education, com- 
mitted a half-dozen indictable offenses after he had been 
cured of alcoholism. And I could give many other exam- 
ples. 

"Of course I do not mean to say that there have not been 
many, many cases of excessive drinkers who were cured 
and then succeeded in finding some innocuous outlet, and 
led successful lives thereafter. But the chances are excel- 
lent that the ex-alcoholic will become something worse. 



The physical unfitness and the lack of education was 

demonstrated as appalling in American youth at the time 
of conscription. General Pershing points out that steps 
should be taken now to bring about better conditions in this 
country. One half of our young men suffered from some 
physical defect and fully one fourth were entirely unfit for 
army work. There is a higher percentage of illiteracy than 
most people suspect. 



If that second-assistant engineer of the Pacific Mail 

liner Creole State, ordered his helpers to put emery powder 
in the bearings of the steamer and disable her he should 
get all that is coming to him. 




Ihe treasured 
secret of coffee - 
roos t in^- produce* 
Hie wondrous flavor 

(Swell's 

^ ^LXA IIONAI CREST 

(offee 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 







IS The Kalamazoo Bugle poking fun at us ? It looks 
so. It professes to have a special correspondent in San 
Francisco who acquaints it with man}' wonderful things 
that are supposed to be occuring here. Particularly is the 
correspondent of the Bugle observant of the miracles, being 
worked by some of our famous scientists of the medical 
profession. Referring to the wonderful blood-testing ma- 
chine of our Doctor Abrams, which can tell parentage more 
accurately than parish baptismal-register, the Kalamazoo 
Bugler says that the extraordinary piece of machinery is 
outdone by various other contrivances invented by our 
unrivalled healers. ***** 

In the line of electric machines that help humanity to 
defy death, the Bugler has learned of some inventions that 
have created such excitement that before one famous heeler 
opens his office patients on crutches begin to assemble in 
numbers. Paralytics in chairs, and rheumatic sufferers by 
scores are seen in the afflicted crowd. Patients too feeble 
to support themselves with sticks sit doggedly on the edge 
of the sidewalk until the moment for miracles arrives. A 
woman nurse in white uniform passes out tags to the wait- 
ing sick, another with a megaphone shouts the number 
a sufferer's turn comes to be electrocuted — no, not that — 
electrified is the better word. 

***** 

This wonderful healer is physically big enough to fight 
two Dempseys. He was formerly a horse-shoer wlmse 
specialty was bucking broncos that would kick an ordinary 
300 pound blacksmith over the moon. Seizing an outlaw 
quadruped by the mane and tail the herculean smith could 
fling a broncho on his back and have a set of shoes clamped 
to his hoofs, before the brute recovered from his astonish- 
ment. ***** 

The motor trucks put the dray horses out of business 
and the gigantic blacksmith with them. What was he to 
do ? He got a shipyard job on armored cruisers, but swung 
such a terrific sledge-hammer he fractured too many steel 
plates and was paid off. 

Then he became an oil-well digger and was making 
money, when he was blown up by a gusher and landed him 
in the next county. Any ordinary man would have been 
broken into fragments, but he was around the power house 
next day helping to install a new electric plant when he 
struck a live wire and had so many volts shot through him 
that all the doctors said he was dead as a mackerel. 

"I'll fool you bunch", he cried jumping to his feet and 
asking the hospital steward how long it was till lunch was 
ready. ***** 

That electrical experience put in the giant well-borer's 
head the idea of utilizing electricity in the healing art. Ik- 
was naturally cross-eyed, but when the full charge from the 
live wire hit him his strabismus was knocked galley west. 
A lump in his chest, which the regular doctors said was 
cancer had also vanished. Fifty dollars in his inside vest 
pocket had also disappeared when he woke up in the hospi- 
tal but he was more inclined to attribute that to the police- 
man who fetched him to the emergency ambulance than to 
electric potency. ***** 

On thinking it over the renovated well-borer concluded 
that he could invent an electric machine which would revo- 
lutionize the medical and surgical business, lie was ad- 
vised to take a summer extension course at the State Uni- 
versity but refused. Most university graduates are run- 



ning street cars he said and "the further away a man keeps 
from books the sooner he'll qualify for the multimillionaire 

C13.SS. ;!• ;fc ;)- ;!; jfc 

After a few consulations with the electricians at the 
city pumping station he perfected his wonderful machine 
and to-day is paying a surtax that would make John D. 
Rokefeller jealous. There is no limit to the healing power 
of his electric jolter. After he has a patient strapped down 
securely he goes at him to discover the real seat of the 
disease. When the sick man hollers for the police the 
healer knows he has located the germ and turns on the 
current. A microbe which could stand the volts aimed at 
him would not be disturbed if an express train ran over 
him. ***** 

The nature of a disease cuts no figure with this mar- 
vellous healer. All human ailments are the same to him — 
rheumatism, heart disease, cirrhosis of the liver, virulent 
cancer (the more virulent the better) softening of the brain, 
Bright's disease, locomotor ataxia. Nobody ever makes 
complaint of his treatment, for if a failure the treatment of 
the undertaker across the street is always a success. It's 
all blamed on the machine. Within its potential scope it 
can cure everything. Should the patient die the disease 
was worse than incurable. It was an insult to the healing 
art to waste electric current on it. 
***** 

Such a line of chatter that the special scientific cor- 
respondent of the Kalamazoo Bugle is publishing about 
San Francisco's matchless healers. Their number is legion 
the Bugler says. They are as thick on every block as 
blackbirds in Golden Gate Park, he asserts. Money is the 
least of their troubles. The field seems to be unlimited. 
Everybody with the requisite lack of book-knowledge, is 
going into the profession — jitney drivers, second story 
workers, fake mining stock brokers, panhandlers, burglars 
on parole, street fakirs, bomb artists — in fact all who de- 
serve to be recognized as up-to-date and progressive citi- 
zens. ***** 

Naturally people may ask, "do these healers obtain 
licenses?" Certainly not. Licenses are what they least 
need. To be licensed would inspire public doubt in their 
abilities. Their great popularity lies in the fact that the 
County Medical Society refuses them licenses and calls 
them "fakirs". The louder the denuncietion better the 
healing business. When a healer is prosecuted in the police 
Court, his fortune is made. He prints the fact on his cards. 
For of course no police judge would dare to convict him and 
lose his popularity. Is not healing by persons without lic- 
enses one of the oldest of arts. There is even scriptural 
authority for it. The deaf, dumb and blind were made to 
hear speak and see and the dead took up his bed and walked. 
If they could do such things two thousand years ago why 
nut at present? There was no County Medical Society to 
give licenses two thousand years ago — luckily for humanity. 
***** 

As the unlicensed bootleggers are getting all the money 
SO with the unlicensed healers. The world is upside down 
say the old fogies of the medical profession but the shrewd 
practitioners are cogitating whether it would not pay 
them better to surrender their licenses and open healing 
offices with large electric signs and a jazz orchestra and 
shimmie dancers to entertain the waiting patients. 



Strong Candidate for Public Administrator 

In political circles it is considered likely that Supervisor 
Joseph Mulvihill will make a strong run for the office of 
Public Administrator at the next election. Not only has 
Supervisor Mulvihill been twice elected to the office he 
holds but on his second appearance as a candidate he was 
paid the gratifying compliment of receiving the highest 
vote cast for any incumbent. If that be an indication of 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR AUGUST 13, 1921 



how he will run for the office of Public Administrator, the 
contest is already as good as over. 

Mr. Mulvihill is in the prime of life and full of the 
energy which is needed to obtain public office. He is an 
effective public speaker with a pleasant personality which 
makes him many friends, lie seems to have lost none in 
his six years service in the Board of Supervisors where he 
has worked hard in promoting and supporting all legisla- 
tion for the betterment of San Francisco. He is a member 
of the Public Utilities Committee and Chairman of the 
Committees on Public Streets, Public Welfare, and Motion 
Pictures. He is vice-president of the State Association of 
Supervisors and it is his boast that his work with that 
organization has been of material aid to our city. He was 
secretary of the Grand Jury in 1914 — 15. 

Among the fraternal organizations with which he is 
connected are the Olympic Club, Elks, Moose, Foresters, 
Eagles and Woodmen of the World. 

There is no doubt that with his record in the Board of 
Supervisors and his political and fraternal connection, Mr. 
Mulvihill is an extraordinarily strong candidate The Dem- 
ocrats will require to name a remarkably popular opponent 
to capture the office of Public Administrator, which for 
some years has been regarded as a sort of legacy. Usually 
it has been considered a prize for some citizen of pro- 
nounced popularity. In that respect Supervisor Mulvihill 
will have no trouble in measuring up to the requirements 
and in the matter of performing the duties efficiently his 
more difficult position in the Board guarantees his ability. 



FAMOUS SOCIALIST FAILURES 

(Continued from page 6.) 



England's King in Politics. 

The idea that the King of England is a mere figure-head, 
accepting the advice of his Ministers, was never entirely 
true and is not true today. The King is a constitutional 
sovereign but there are now in his empire many constitu- 
tions and many nations, not one alone. Lloyd ( ieorge tend- 
ers advice, but the King may well answer that there are 
other Prime Ministers also tendering advice — that General 
Smuts has useful ideas about Ireland and Mr. Meighen of 
Canada important objections to the Anglo-Japanese alli- 
ance. Mr. Hughes of Australia is also one of the King's 
constitutional advisers, and the day has passed when the 
Dominions could only approach the throne through a sub- 
ordinate Minister, the Colonial Secretary. In granting 
Constitutions to the Dominions. Britain did not realize that 
she was providing pillars for the throne, with foundations 
laid far beyond her shores. As matters now stand, a rev 
olution in England would shatter the British Empire. If 
England wanted a change, it is by no means certain that 
the change would be welcome in Canada and Xew Zealand. 

A new importance must be attached, therefore, to the 
personality of the British sovereign, We have seen him 

restraining Mr. Lloyd George's comments in French policy. 
smoothing over another of the Prime Minister's indiscre- 
tions which had disturbed Colonel Harvey, and irritating 

proposals for a truce in Ireland. The King's relations with 
his Prime Minister are thus a subject which will greatly 
interest the historian. Their friendship began with King 
Edward's death. Other Ministers kissed hands with the 
new monarch, and uttered the usual protestations of loyal 
sympathy. 1 .loyd ( ieorge. how ever, exclaimed : "1 want to 
tell you, sir. that in your father we had not only the King 
but a personal friend." 

King (ieorge was moved and replied: "Mr. Lloyd 
(Ieorge \mi are the first man who has said to me a human 

U I 'I'd." 

With that almost uncanny tact of which he is master. 
Lloyd < S that the Queen is. first and forc- 

i mother. As Minister in Attendance, therefore, the 
Chancellor of the Exchequer, as be then was. usually 
brought presents for the youngsters, who with their 
parents found him irresistible. As Prime Minister Lloyd 
(ieorge has no right to expect from the King more than 
acquiesence in his policy. l'ut he knew that in many 
dvisable to stand well with the King. 



of these dared go near the polls and the Commune was con- 
sidered "legally established." 

Communistic Liberty. 

The first manifestation of Liberty was the suppression of 
all independent newspapers. The next act was robber) of 
the Bank of France of 16,000,000 francs. A Law of Hos- 
tages was passed decreeing that for every person executed 
by the French troops, three hostages would be seized b\ 
the Commune. The Archbishop of Paris, various ecclesi- 
astics and teachers who had nothing to do with the political 
strife, were arrested. The Vendome Column was pulled 
down, churches were broken open, church yards were rifled 
and the remains of the dead cast into the streets. 
Paris Set on Fire. 

When it became evident that the Commune was doomed 
and the cordon of French troops around the city drew 
closer the Socialist Board of Works proceeded to burn 
down Paris. All citizens were ordered to report at once, 
if they had any petroleum. Public buildings were drenched 
with kerosene and set on fire. The thirty-five priests who 
had been seized as hostages were dragged from their pris- 
ons and shot by the National Guard. The Regular French 
troops having begun to enter Paris and endeavored to sub- 
due the incendiary fires, but the Socialists fought fiercely 
to prevent such action. The Archbishop of Paris and the 
remainder of the unfortunate hostages were ordered to be 
murdered by order of the Executive Committee of the 
Commune. The order was immediately obeyed. 

Killed on the Altar. 

Seeing that all means and avenues of escape were being 
closed against them the Communist leaders tried to make 
a stand against the troops at the church of the Madeleine. 
The troops showed the murderous gang no mercy and 
slaughtered them on the altar. 

It is a singular fact that the Commune of Paris, with its 
infamous record of private and public robbery, arson ami 
murder, is regarded by Socialists throughout the world, as 
the one event which they have agreed to celebrate. Mr. 
Amold-Forster, a well-known English writer mentions that 

important fact in his work "English Socialism of To-Day" 

and quotes the words of Belford Bax. a socialist author. 
"The Paris Commune is a landmark, being the first admin- 
istration manned by the working classes and having for 
its more or less conscious aim the rorganization of social 
conditions — the transformation of a civilized society into 
a Socialistic society. Every 18th of March witness 

thousands of gatherings throughout the world to commem- 
orate the (alas only temporary) victory of organized 
Socialist aspiration over the forces of property and priv- 
ilege in 1871." 

Wedding Presents — The choicest variety to select from 
at Marsh's who is now permanently located at Post and 
Powell St; 



The EYE and the BRAIN 

Poor Memory, Heada< :h«, I 'i/.zinpps. 

Weak, Inflamed. Smart Injf, Sensitive 
Byes, Flr-aiinR Spots, Crusty 
nutated E> • gmatlem, 

Watery Eyes and inability to see ob- 
learly — all these symptoms and 
fier ailments caii 
Indirectly attributed i-> EYE STRAIN. 
T<> RELIEVE THESE AILMENTS 
YOU MUST REMOVE THE CAUSE 
nd most scl< 

• ] In examining children's 
nd complice "f eye 

GEORGE MAYERLE 

EXCLUSIVE EYESIGHT SPECIALIST 

■ 

n San Kran 

960 MARKET STREET 

Between Mason and Taylor 
SAN FRANCISCO 




10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



^tomohjlo 




HINTS TO MOTORISTS WHO 

WISH TO HAVE TROUBLE 

Drive fast and attempt to stop sud- 
denly on a wet pavement. 

Start the engine with the switch 
turned of: ur without gasoline in the 
tank. 

Forget that using the starter a cer- 
tain number of times will exhaust the 
supply of curent in the battery, unless 
the. engine is run sufficiently to re- 
charge it. 

Fill the lubricator in the engine and 
neglect to lubricate other parts of the 
car. 

Advance the spark when starting the 
engine. 

Allow the clutch to engage suddenly. 

Apply the brakes suddenly when it 
isn't at all necessary. 

Push in the starting button when the 
engine is running. 

Blame the starter when the engine 
doesn't start, without looking into the 
gasoline tank. 

Neglect to inspect the level of the 
acid in the storage battery, even after 
two or three weeks have gone by. and 
overlook a supply of distilled water 
needed. 

Shift from third to second or first 
gear when the car is running at a high 
rate of speed. 

Shift reverse gear when the car is 
moving ahead. 

Neglect to investigate any unusual 
sound which may develop in the car. 

Overlook keeping the tires properly 
inflated. 

Release clutch when the throttle is 
open very wide. 

Benevolently allow every Tom, Dick 
and Harry to drive your car without 
admonition or chiding. 

Let every mechanic, or so-called re- 
pair man make us believe he knows 
more about the way the car ought to 
be built than the manufacturer. 

e the starte' to run the car. even 
while understanding that excessive 
overload on the battery is very injur- 
ious. 

Allow your car to stand in puddles of 
oil or water, while perfectly aware that 
neither one is good for the tires. 

Overlook the fact that pan. engine 
and other mechanical parts of a car 
should be kept clean. 

Turn corners too fast. 

Open the throttle quickly, without 
giving the motor a chance to pick up 
gradually. 
Find it too much trouble to keep your 



brakes adjusted — or at least too much 
trouble to keep your mind on it. 

Neglect to familiarize yourselves 
with the use of the hand lever brake 
and thus be prepared for emergencies. 

Fail to release the clutch before 
shifting gears. 

Accelerate too quickly, and so enjoy 
the car jumping and the motor pound- 
ing. 

Fail to examine the car occasionally 
for loose nuts and bolts. 

Race your engine under any and all 
circumstances when you feel like it. 

Fail to heed the squeak that calls for 
oil. 

THINGS TO REMEMBER 

Steering will be easier if the steering 
knuckle pivot pins are kept well greas- 
ed. * * * 

Keep spring tight at the axles. 
That's where most spring breaks oc- 
cur. * * * 

Riding car tracks, bumping curbs 
and speeding over rough roads cuts 
down tire milage and makes for blow- 

OlltS. jj; ^ ^ 

Spark plugs may crack if not pro- 
perly cooled; keep water system filled. 

Make grade crossings in second or 
low gear, to maintain control over the 
car. # # * 

Prevent blowouts by avoiding severe 
jolts and maintaining full pressure. 

* * * 
Tightening up every nut and bolt on 

the car about once a month increases 
the life of the car. 

* * * 

The breather pipe on the crankcase 
often indicates the condition of c< im- 
pression within the cylinders insofar as 
piston rings arc concerned. If the 
rings are leaking, gas will be constant- 
ly escaping from the breather pipe 
while the engine is in operation, while 
if the rings fit tightly and allow no 
compression leak, the escape of gas 
will not be noticeable. 

* * * 

Before removing all spark plug wires 
from distributor terminals be sure to 
mark each wire and its corresponding 
terminal in some way so that when 
wires are reassembled they will not be 
placed on wrong terminals. Knocking, 
misfiring, and backfiring of the engine 



will result in wrong placing, while in 
the majority of cases the engine will 
not run at all. * * * 

To test a spark plug by running a 
high tension current through it outside 
of the engine often proves unsatisfac- 
tory because the plug, even if it is a 
new one, may fire properly when not 
under compression in a cylinder, but 
when subjected to pressure within the 
cylinder will not function. Each type 
(if engine has a certain kind of spark 
plug which fires the best under com- 
pression. This plug should always be 
used. 

Operation of Choke 

The time to pull the choke out is 
when stopping the engine rather than 
when starting. Under most condi- 
tions the engine will start much more 
readily if this is done. If the choke is 
operated while starting the engine 
must turn several revolutions before 
the cylinders are filled with a rich, 
combustible mixture. On the other 
hand, if the choke is closed just an in- 
stant before the switch is turned off 
the engine will come to rest with its 
cylinders full of rich mixture, so that 
in most cases when the engine is start- 
ed again it will "catch" on the very 
first half turn. Some owners follow 
the plan of stopping the engine by 
pulling out the choke and turning off 
the switch when the engine comes to 
rest. 

In Shifting Gears 

The easiest way to shift to a lower 
gear, and this advice applies especially 
when on a steep hill, is as follows : Do 
not move the accelerator pedal but 
hold it just where it is. Then push the 
clutch out gradually until the engine 
has speeded up sufficiently to accom- 
modate the lower gear. Shift imme- 
diately and let the clutch back in. 
If climbing a steep hill on high natur- 
ally the accelerator pedal is all the way 
down and the throttle is wide open. In 
making the shift the pedal is kept in 
this position. The acceleration of the 
engine to the higher speed required 
by second gear is accomplished by 
pushing the pedal out. It is import- 
ant not to push the pedal all the way 
out as this would unduly race the en- 
gine. On the contrary the pedal should 
just be released enough to accelerate 
the engine to the required speed. 
Holding the pedal in this position the 
shift should be made instantly and the 
pedal allowed to come back as soon as 
possible thereafter. If the shift is made 
exactly as described it may be accomp- 
lished quietly and without loss of mo- 
mentum, and these are the two out- 
standing advantages of the method. 
However, if any difficulty is encount 
ered the movement may be modified by 
letting up on the accelerator just 
during the instant that the shifting 
lever is in motion. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR AUGUST 13, 1921 



Sunbeams 



He Was Sensitive 

"I think 'Lohengrin' is just splendid," 
murmured the lady in the large hat, as 
she handed the condutor her fare. 

"Do you?" said her friend, who had 
accompanied her to the opera that eve- 
ning. "I much prefer 'Carmen'." 

The conductor blushed. 
"Sorry, miss," he murmered apologet- 
ically. "Im married. You might try 
the motorman, though. He's single. — 
Buffalo News. 



A Striped Kimono. 

A country vicar's daughter called on 
an old lady and, by special request, read 
to her a letter just received from her 
sailor son. 

"What a nice letter,, Mrs. Smith!" 
said the visitor, as she returned it to 
the proud old woman. "And the pre- 
sent he is sending you sounds awfully 
good. But what will you do with a 
striped kimono?" 

"Well you may ask, miss!" exclaim- 
ed Mrs. Smith in despair. "I dunno, 
I'm sure. I s'pose I can chain it up in 
the yard, or keep it in the pigsty. But 
what I'll feed it on goodness only 
knows I" 



Experience — "You know," said the 
lady whose motor car had run down a 
man, "you must have been walking 
very carelessly. I am a very careful 
driver. 1 have been driving a car for 
seven years." 

"Lady, you've got nothing on inc. 
I've been walking for fifty-four." 



Did His Best — Village constable (to 
villager who has been knocked down 
by passing motorcyclist) — "You didn't 
See the number, but could you swear 
to the man?" 

\ illager — "1 did. but 1 don't think 'e 
Yard me," — Galveston News. 



Prepardness — New lynch — "I'm get- 
ting an automobile. What is the first 

thing one ought to learn about running 
it?" 

Wiseacre--" The telephone number 
of the nearest repair shop." 



No Fault at All — Gentleman— (to 

house agent | — The great disadvantage 
is the house is so damp. House 

Agent — Disadvantage, sir? Advant- 
age. I call it. In case of tire it wouldn't 
so likely to burn." — Pearson's 
Weeklx ( 1 ondon). 



Tough Luck — "This unemployment 
situation is tierce, isn't it, Binghams?" 
"Yeah, Punk! It makes me feel rot- 
ten to think all these men are loafing 



and I got a job and have t' work!' 
Richmond Times-Dispatch. 



Trying Society Tactics— Wife— 
don't you think, dear, the grass on the 
lawn ought to be cut? Hub — Certain- 
ly — let's ignore it. — Boston Transcript. 



11 



Realism — Friend, (viewing picture) 
—How realistic! It fairly makes my 
mouth water. Artist— A sunset makes 
your mouth water? Friend — Bless 
me! I thought it was a fried egg. — 
Boston Transcript. 



Trouble Enough — "Simpkins is always 
borrowing trouble." Not always. 
Sometimes he pays for it. He bought 
a second-hand Lizzie yesterday." 



Preparedness — A certain clergyman 
always felt it his duty to give each 
couple a little serious advice before he 
performed the marriage ceremony. 
He usually took them aside one at a 
time and talked very soberly to each 
regarding the great importance of the 
step they were about to take and the 
new responsibilities they were to as- 
sume. One day he talked in his most 
earnest manner for several minutes to 
a young woman who had come to be 
married. "And now," he said, in clos- 
ing, "I hope you fully realize the ex- 
treme importance of the step you are 
taking and that vou are prepared for 
it." 

"Prepared!" replied the bride inno- 
cently. "Well, if 1 ain't prepared, I 
don't know who is. I've got four com- 
mon quilts and two nice ones and four 
brand new feather beds, ten sheets and 
twelve pairs of pillow-slips, four linen 
tablecloths, a dozen spoons and a new 
six-quart kettle, and lots of other 
things." — Houston Post. 



His Fears Realized — A northern man 
in an optician's shop in Nashville over- 
heard an amusing conversation be- 
tween the proprietor of the establish- 
ment and an aged darky who was just 
leaving the place with a pair of new 
spectacles. 

As the old fellow neared the door 
his eye lighted upon an extraordinary 
looking instrument conspicuously plac- 
ed upon a counter. The venerable 
negro paused for several moments to 
gaze in open-mouthed wonder at this 
thing, the like of which he had never 
seen before. After a long struggle 
with his curiosity he was vanquished. 
Turning to the optician he said : 

"What is it, boss?" 

"That is an ophthalmotonometer," 
replied the optician in his gravest man- 
ner. 

"Sho," muttered the old man to him- 
self, as he backed out of the door, his 
eyes still fastened upon the curious 
looking thing on the counter. "Sho, 
dat's what I was afeard it was." — Har- 
per's Magazine. 



Loser or Winner? — Geography Prof. 

— Please give us the name of the larg- 
est diamond. Slude (the morning af- 
ter) The ace. doctor. — Carolina Tar 
Baby. 



She Told Him — "Lester was one of 
the best men that ever lived." "How 
do you know?" "Oh. I married his 
widow." — London Mail. 



He Killed It, Anyway! — "Were you impo- 
lite to her?" "I don't know. She said a 
mosquito was biting her ankle." 



CASA DEL R£Y cTnforn"^ 

THE MILLION DOLLAR FIREPROOF HOTEL 

The ideal spot for your summer outing with its warm beach bathing; 
dancing: good music: artistic, home-like, spacious lobby. 

This is a most wonderful place for children. Beautiful playgrounds; 
sanitary warm bathing pool; swimming instructors; saddle ponies for 
children. Special kitchenette where maid can prepare food for young 
children. 

Motor roads in tine condition via Sargents, Chittenden Pass and Wat- 
sonville, on the Coast Route via La Honda. The Southern Pacific offers 
special round trip, week-end rates as well as tickets good for several 
w < eks. 

Cottage City, operated on the European plan, is also under the same 
management as Casa Del Rev. 

Correspondence regarding rates for families with maids and children 
solicited. Special rates by the week or for extended stays of a month or 
two. Add- 

CASA DEL REY, Santa Cruz, Calif. 

MORRIS & WARNER. Propr- 
TELEPHONE GOO 



12 



SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 




Engagements 

MISS Frances Revett has set the 
date for her marriage to Mr. 
Bradley Wallace for Septem- 
ber 8. The wedding will take place at 
Grace Cathedral at noon and there will 
be several bridesmaids and ushers. 

Miss Revett is being constantly en- 
tertained Among the affairs given for 
her this week was a luncheon at which 
Mrs. Herbert Gould was hostess at the 
Town and Country Club on Wednes- 
day. 

The wedding of Miss Marian 

Wirtner and Lieutenant Hubert Hav- 
en Anderson, U. S. N., will take place 
at St. Luke's church on Monday even- 
ing, the Sth of September. Miss Doris 
Wirtner will be her sister's maid of 
honor and the bridesmaids will be 
Miss Helen Perkins, Miss Margaret 
Buckbee, Miss Harriet Wirtner, Miss 
Katherine Stoney, Miss Elvira Coburn 
and Miss Newell Bull. 

Miss Anne Dibblee, daughter of 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert J. Dibblee, will be 
married to Frederick Hope Beaver on 
Saturday, October 1. The wedding will 
take place in Ross. 

Luncheons 

Mrs. Frederick Sharon gave a 

luncheon Tuesday at the Palace Hotel 
and entertained Mrs. George T. Marye, 
Mrs. Horace Blanchard Chase. Miss 
F"anny and Miss May Friedlander, Mrs. 
Harry Mendell. Mrs. Rudolph Spreck- 
els and Mrs. Russell Wilson. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Pope gave a 

luncheon Sunday at their Burlingame 
home for Major General and Mrs. 
William Mason Wright. Several of 
the guests were from the East. Capt. 
Clark Woodward, U. S. N., who recent- 




'9\ 



139-153 GEARY ST. 

^Srnapt^/lpparel 

ron UUomen 

and u]j&ses 

SKji<2 aivcl Quality 
U/itkoui: Extravagance 




ly arrived for duty on this Coast, 
greeted friends he made during the Ex- 
position, when he was naval aide to 
Director General Charles C. Moore of 
the Exposition. Mr. Raymond Baker, 
who is on his annual inspection tour of 
mints of the West, was also there. Mr. 
and Mrs. George N. Arm shy, who have 
made their home in New York and 
Washington for the past several years. 
were among the guests. The Armsbys 
arrived a few days ago and joined their 
children, Miss Leonora Armsby and 
George Armsby. Jr., who have been 
visiting their uncles, Messrs. Gordon 
and Raymond Armsby. at Burlingame 
for the past six weeks. 

Mrs. William F. Perkins gave a 

luncheon on Thursday for Mrs. George 
Ali of New York, who is at the St. 
Francis with Mr. Ali for a few weeks' 
stay. The luncheon took place at the 
Francisca Club. 

Mrs. Ira Pierce gave a luncheon and 
bridge party on Friday for Mrs. Ali. 

Mrs. R. P. Schwerin asked some of 

her friends to a luncheon party at her 
home in San Mateo on Thursday. 

Mrs. Mountford S. Wilson asked 

guests to a luncheon party at her home 
in Burlingame on Friday, August 12. 

Dinners 

Mrs. William Taylor gave a dinner 

recently at he rhome in Menlo Park 
and entertained Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
Templeton Crocker, Mr. and Mrs. Al- 
exander Hamilton, Mr. and Mrs. Ru- 
dolph Spreckels. Mr. Walter Martin, 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles McCormick, Mr. 
and Mrs. Evan Williams. Miss Marjo- 
rie Josselyn, Captain Ronald Banon, 
Messrs. Gordon Armsby and Stewart 
Lowery. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Harris 

gave a dinner Saturday evening at 
their home at Woodside to celebrate 
the birthday of Mrs. Harris' mother, 
Mrs. Joseph L. King. The guests were 
nearly all relatives, and included Gen- 
eral and Mrs. Oscar F. Long. Mr. and 
Mrs. Joseph L. King, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. 
Ralph King. Mrs. Jolin Metcalfe. Mr. 
and Mrs. John Henry Russell Mrs. 
Russell Wilson, Mrs. George Cadwal- 
ader and Mr. Percy King. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. T. Marye, gave 

a dinner Saturday evening at their 
home in Burlingame for Mr. Raymond 
T. Baker, who was with them in Rus- 
sia as secretary to the American em- 
basy while Mr. Marye was ambas- 
sador. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. O. G.. Miller gave 

a dinner recently for Mr. and Mrs. 



Frederick McNear. who have been con- 
stantly entertained here and down the 
peninsula since their return from their 
honeymoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels 

gave an informal supper party Sunday 
at their Burlingame home and enter- 
tained some of their friends down the 
peninsula. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph D. Grant 

entertained friends at a dinner party 
on Thursday evening at their home in 
Burlingame. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Martin gave 

a dinner dance Saturday evening for 
their daughter. Miss Mar)- Martin, 
who will be formally introduced to so- 
ciety in the fall. It took place at Cu- 
pertino, where the Martin family is 
spending the summer, and the guests 
included the other girls who will be 
debutantes this year, and an equal 
number of men. 

In Town and Out 

Mr. Willard Chamberlain arrived 

from Pittsburg Saturday and joined 
Mrs. Chamberlain who rented the 
Samuel Knight cottage at Burlingame 
when she came to California several 
weeks ago. 

Mrs. Jane Selby Hayne and small 

daughter have gone to Lake Tahoe to 
visit with Mr. and Mrs. Alvah Kaime. 

Mrs. Arthur W. Collins and her 

three children are here from Honolulu, 
visiting Mrs. Collins' mother, Mrs E. 
LI. Kittreclge. at her home near Sara- 
toga. 

Miss Kathryn Masten, who has 

been out of town for several weeks. 
visiting at Santa Rosa and elsewhere, 
has returned to her home on Wash- 
ington street. 

George M. Armsby and George Jr. 

and Miss Leonora Armsby, accompa- 
nied by Messrs. Raymond and Gordon 
Armsby, left Monday for Del Monte. 
Santa Barbara and on south as fancy 
pleases. 

Mrs. Robert I lowland, and her 



The 
Palace 

FOR 

Exclusive 
Entertainment 



Mtinnircment of 

Halsey K. Manwuring 




CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR AUGUST 13, 1921 



13 



daughter, Mrs. Louise Howland, have 
returned to their home in Sausalito af- 
ter a trip to the mountains. They vis- 
ited several places in the Sierras, 
among them Downieville, which was 
Mrs. 1 lowland's home as a girl. 

Covington Janin has returned from 

Burlingame, where he passed the week 
end with friends. Janin is here on his 
vacation from Harvard and is with Mr. 
and Mrs. George Harry Mendell, Jr., 
at their home in Pacific avenue. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. O. McCormick 

and the Misses Margaret and Mary 
McCormick are enjoying a visit of 
several weeks in Santa Barbara from 
their home in Santa Cruz. The ma- 
tron's sister, Mrs.H. Hatch, and little 
Miss Peggy Hatch are also visiting 
in the mission city. 

Miss Ysabel Chase has returned 

from Monterey, where she passed the 
week-end as the guest of Mr. and Mrs. 
Felton Elkins, who are established at 
their new home. It was one of the old 
Spanish adobes, which they have reno- 
vated and redecorated, so that it com- 
bines the romantic beauty of the old 
home with modern comforts and con- 
veniences. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Hussey 

have returned to their home in San 
Mateo after a camping trip in the 
northern part of the state, where they 
have been all summer. 

Mrs. Hussey's sister. Mrs Walter 
Hobart, and her son, Richard Magee, 
are at the Dean ranch in Nevada. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Sproule, 

who have been in Southern California 
have gone east and and will be at home 
after the middle of the month. 

Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels and the 

Misses Eleanor and Claudine Spreck- 
els have gone to Del Monte for the 

" ' Intimations 

Dr. and Mrs. Philip King Brown 

and their son and new daughter-in-law. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hillycr Brown, are ex- 
pected this week from the East. The 
marriage of Mr. Hillyer Brown and 
Miss Emily Longfellow Burns was an 
event in Boston of June 23. The young 
couple will visit his aunt. Dr. Adelaide 
Brown, when they first arrive here 
and will later move into their own 
home. 
Mr. EugenC Lent and his two 

daughters, the Missis Prances and 

Ruth Lent, have returned to Paris 
from England, where thev recently en- 
joyed an extended visit, and they will 

be m France the remainder of their 
Sta) abroad. The Misses Lent have 
written that they will sail for the Uni- 
ted States September 24 and they prob- 
ably will make a visit on the Atlantic 
toast before returning to California. 

Mr. Raymond T. Baker has ar- 
rived in California from Washington 

for his annual visit, and is with rela- 
tives in Oakland. It was expected that 
Mrs. Baker and the children would 
come West w ith him from the Raker 



home in Lenox, but the plans were 
changed. Mrs. Baker, little Miss Glo- 
ria Baker and Alfred and George Van- 
derbilt are spending this week with 
Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt Sr. at the 
Breakers, the Vanderbilt mansion at 
Newport. 

Mrs. C. L. Six and her daughter. 

Miss Genevieve Six, have come from 
Stockton on account of the serious 
illness of Mrs. Six' mother, Mrs. J. D. 
Peters, and are at the Fairmont. 

Mr. and Mrs. Prentis C. Hale, who 

were to have sailed from England for 
home last week, have prolonged their 
stay abroad and will not sail until Sep- 
tember. They are on a several weeks' 
motor trip through Scotland and Eng- 
land and will stop in London for a 
fortnight before starting home. 

Mrs. Frank Winchester and Miss 

Margaret Foster were hostesses to 
their friends at a bridge party Wed- 
nesday afternoon at San Rafael. 
Mr. Carlton Earl Miller has re- 
covered from the accident which oc- 
cured on the trial trip of his new yacht 
and has gone to Santa Barbara for the 
yacht races. Mr. Edgar Van Bergen 
has also gone south for the races and 
later will take a party of friends on his 
boat Katenda to the coast of Lower 
California 

The Rudolph Spreckels family may 

decide to go to 1'aris this fall to visit 
their relatives there and later on go 
to the Riviera. 

Mrs. Herbert Hoover and the 

Hoover children, who have been at 
their home in Palo Alto all slimmer, 
have returned to Washington. I ). i . 
Herbert Hoover. Jr., will enter Stan- 
ford University this fall. Both of his 

parents graduated from there. Allen 

Hoover. is in public high school. 

Mrs. Hoover lias been detained here 
by the illness of her mother. Mrs. Hen- 
ry, who is gradually improving in vi- 
tality and health. 

Mrs. William B. Bourn. Mrs. Geo. 

T. Marye. and Mrs. Thomas IV 
will be host •he three forthcom- 
ing afternoon lectures at which John 
Cowper Powvs will make the talk. 
Mrs. Edwin C. O'Dea and her sis- 
ter. Miss Margaret May. who have 
been away on a cruise about the West 
Indies" and elsewhere will be joined in 
New York by Mr and Mrs. John H. 
Rosseter, who deferred their trip 
until a little later. The Rosseters are 
summering on their ranch near Santa 
Rosa. 

The plans for the horse show to 

be given in Menlo Park this Saturday 
are in the hands of Miss Eleanor Weir. 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William 
Weir, and Miss Walta Linforth. 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter H. 
Linforth. 

Miss Marion W irtner is being en- 
tertained at a series of affairs during 
the coming week- Miss Margaret 
Buckbee cards for a lunch- 



eon and bridge at which she will as- 
semble a group of the friends of Miss 
Wirtner on Friday afternoon. Mrs. 
Warner l'.liss will give a bridge tea in 
her honor on the 16th, and Mrs. John 
Harron will be hostess at a luncheon 
at the Francisca Club on the following 
day. The Misses Sally and Nance Obear 
will entertain at bridge one afternoon 
during the following week and Mrs. 
Theodore Rethers, Jr. has planned a 
similar affair for the same week. 

On Friday Mr. and Mrs. Charles 

R. Bentley gave a moonlight party on 
the bay, entertaining the friends of 
their son, Wilder Bentley. 




I HOTEL ST. FRANCIS I 

! • -SAN FRANCISCO* • •! 

A BIG HOTEL I 

•WHEBE THE LITTLE THINGS COUNT I 

tr ^ 



The Witchery and Charm 

of Ihe New Compositions 

played by 

ART HICKMAN 

and his Famous Orchestra 
will captivate you. 

IN 

THE GARDEN 

9 to I 
every cvenine 

Tlios. J. COLEMAN 
M>i muter 



I. E. BIRMINGHAM Main Corridor 

• • • • » « 

PALACE HOTEL Opposite K.>sc Room 
• • * 
In Platinum 
. • « « « * 

REMODELING Old Styles Into New 

• • • • • » 
UNIQUE DESIGNS Time-Keeping Watches 

• • • • • • 
FINE JEWELRY >f All Descriptions 



• * • 
JKW ! 



• « 



• * » 



FXTERT 



Repair Work 



HEW YORK 


r.\Ris 


\ TRKATM'ENT FOR 
ANT> HAIR. 


M.I' 


I 

use.1 
THE FRANCES FOX 


! an'I 


spiUI 
an'I 


INSTITUTE 




H«m 


506 Crocker Bldg., Market and Post 


Phone Sutter 


3118 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 





UnNANOAI^ 




Now That The Banks have stopped 
"rationing of credit" to a certain ex- 
tent one can breathe more freely and 
say what may be one's mind. Rigorous 
rationing has been very effective but 
it also has brought with it much harm. 
It has been a fearful burden to some of 
our merchants and manufacturers and 
has been hard to bear. Some of our 
merchants were caught with stocks on 
hand which they had bought at top 
prices and many of these have had the 
time of their young lives to pull 
through. Right on top of the decision 
of the banks to freeze credit came the 
strikes and the lock-outs and it seem- 
ed to those who were caught that San 
Francisco would have hard enough a 
time of it without being handicapped 
by dear money or no money at all. 
Do not think for one minute that the 
times have changed so sharply that it 
is time to stop whistling and that we 
are out of the woods. The woods are 
thinner and the light streams through 
in spots, it is true, but we are still 
in the woods and we will be, some of 
us,, for another year. The "frozen 
credit" must be thawed by the sun of 
prosperity before money may be bor- 
rowed again as freely as in the years 
before the war. We are steering very 
closely toward a spell of cheaper mon- 
ey. The progress is bound to be very 
slow, however, so don't shout and 
throw your hats in the air. 
* * * 

Money is Still Tight although loans 
are being made. Business however, 
has not yet felt any impulse through 
the loosening the purse strings of the 
bankers. There are many signs of 
activity being renewed in the near fut- 
ure, however. Building operations 
which had been neglected and almost 
at a standstill are being taken up again 
and there have been some large realty 
transactions. At the moment, business 
is affected, too, by the extremely hot 
weather, followed by torrential rains 
and a chill atmosphere which is entire- 
ly unseasonal. This is but a transient 
condition, and vacationing being over, 
it is expected that local retail business 
will be just as active as ever. In San 
Francisco retail business is improving 
and with the return of thousands from 
vacations a greater improvement may 
confidently be expected. In the strin- 
gency in money matters we have been 
going through it is remarkable that the 
West and especially California and no- 
tably San Francisco has not suffered 
as much as has been the case in the 
past and the greater depression has 
covered the Eastern centers. New York 
seems to have been hit the hardest and 
all of the manufacturing centers have 



had their share of hard times. San 
Francisco, of all the coast cities, seem- 
ed to have suffered the least and is the 
first to show signs of recovery. 



Shipping — The figures, which have 
just been made public, substantiate the 
statements made in these columns as 
to the improvement in export and im- 
port business. While it is true that 
these figures show a recession for im- 
portations they show a very material 
increase for exports. These figures 
apply to the month of June and arc as 
to the port of San Francisco, alone. 
Flowever, if business at this port shows 
such a gain in the month of June it 
may be taken for granted that there 
has been the same gain the country 
over at all export points. Naturally 
and logically, this indicates that the 
ocean carriers must be doing a very 
perceptibly increased business. The 
increase in business is in relation to 
exports to Asia. Japan, which was hit 
first by the bad times, following the 
armistice, is, of all the Asiatic na- 
tions, the first to recover. The I'hil- 
ipines has suffered by the slackness 
but here, too. the state of trade is much 
improved. China is a prey to about 
fifty-seven varieties of civil war and 
brigandage and it is doubtful if she will 
eventually revive under the guidance 
of an iron-handed Occidental. Some 
Chinese ports are doing business but 
others are dead. Shanghai is busy 
while Tientsin is quiescent. There is 
practically no business with the inte- 
rior. Canton is slow. Hongkong is 
still the Queen of the East and holds 
supreme sway in business affairs. The 
Dutch East Indies never did feel the 
pinch of war and a great development 
is now going on in Java and Sumatra. 
The Australians are bidding for Java- 
nese trade and they are getting a good 
share of it. In Mexico, San Francisco 
(inns are making a very good progress 
while in the rest of South America 
and the Central American states all 
is at a standstill. The only country 
showing some improvement is Chili. 
The betterment of trade in these coun- 
tries, and indeed with Asian countries 
as well, depends on the exchange sit- 
uation. In the meanwhile, taking ad- 
vantage of the situation the Belgian 
and German manufacturers are flood- 
ing the Latin countries with their 
goods and underselling the Americans. 
The German and Belgian prices are 
from twenty to twenty-five per cent 
less than the American. It is perfectly 
true to say in the case of German}' the 
quality isn't there but that does not 
prevent Germany from selling the 



goods anyhow because the difference 
in price is so very greatly in favor of 
Germany. * * * 

Insurance — Some time ago the SAN 
FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER refer- 
red to the lack of water for fire pro- 
tection purposes in various sections of 
the Metropolitan Bay District and 
notably in San Francisco where the 
auxiliary high pressure salt water sys- 
tem is not available. San Francisco's 
need of more water was spoken of in 
relation to a big general fire or of two 
or more large fires at the same time. 
In some other districts of the bay- 
cities there is a marked lack of water 
which would be felt even in an ordina- 
ry conflagration. In Alameda, as well 
as in all of the cities supplied by the 
Municipal Water District, in Marin 
County, there is a great danger of 
water scarcity through "frictiona! re- 
sistance". The situation is one de- 
manding immediate attention in a city 
such as Alameda, which has one of the 
finest motorized fire departments in 
the whole country. As far as the Ma- 
rin cities are concerned, the managers 
of the Municipal District are tearing 
up and replacing the small mains (two 
inch ) carrying water from the big sup- 
ply at Lagunitas. Within a year the 
whole of the cities, under this supply, 
will have larger mains and a plentiful 
supply of water. 

The forested areas in Marin Count- 
ty are a source of danger through lire. 
Last week a fire was started on Mount 
Tamalpais, which burned over an acre 
of ground and which, had it not occur- 
ed early in the morning when every- 
thing was more or less damp from Eog, 
might have been fanned into a fearful 
fire. This from evidence discovered, 
was started from a neglected camp 
fire. There are certain rules about 
fires on the mountain and in the re- 
serve and places have been provided for 
fires. Permits must be obtained to 
build fires. In the last few years a 
number of houses have been burned 
through the carelessness of campers or 
cigarette smokers. The insurance rep- 
resentatives should demand rigorous 
punishment of anyone found who has 
broken the rules or who may be con- 
victed of being responsible for forest 
fires. A few severe punishments 
would go a long way to instill careful 
habits in the careless or the wilfully 
criminal parties. 

* * * 

Mining — It is now figured by men 

who mine that the impossibility to in- 
terest capital to any very great extent 
in mining ventures or even in develop- 
ed mines may work out to be a g I 

thing. Gold mining must be encotira- 
ged and an energetic attempt will be 
made in Congress to have some law 
passed for the relief of the miner. I his 
and other countries must have gold 
and slackness in gold mining opera- 
tions affects everyone in the country 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR AUGUST 13, 1921 



15 



adversely. Gold mining must be stim- 
ulated by making it pay to mine the 
metal. The gold miner must be reliev- 
ed of taxation and all burdens must be 
removed that make mining an unpro- 
fitable calling. There is a use for all 
of the available gold there is in the 
world today and as soon as there is a 
stop put to the foolish printing of pa- 
per money and the circulation of mill- 
inns in currency by all countries, not 
backed by any kind of a standard in 
value, there is going to be a vastly 
increased demand for gold and gold 
will again become the standard. The 
war arbitrarily displaced gold from its 
position and the world has been going 
on with its business with rapidly de- 
preciating issues of money ever since. 
Governments are printing money is- 
sues as rapidly as the presses can re- 
volve. Until this issuance of paper 
"promises to pay" which are based 
alone on the capacity to keep the prom- 
ise or the willingness to carry it out 
money values will depreciate in pur- 
chasing power. 

* * * 
IN THESE DAYS of strikes and yet more 
strikes, it is necessary to note one glaring 
salient feature of the conditions in Stanis- 
laus and Modesto districts. Here a mob of 
so-called fruit pickers gathered together and 
evicted from their homes from three to four 
hundred Japanese women and children. Ob- 
viously, in order to do so, there must be 
much incidental loss. The Japanese families 
were herded out in the middle of the night 
and bundled into a truck, taken to some 
nearby station and told never to return on 
peril of their lives, must find it impossible 
to carry with them their household goods. 
The aftermath of this deplorable breach of 
the law consists in the fact that it is discov- 
ered the real citizenship of the districts af- 
fected is not at all in sympathy with what 
has been done. The glaring feature of the 
situation is found in the fact that, after driv- 
ing out the industrious Japanese, the fruit 
pickers' union members, who composed most 
of the mob, have refused to take the jobs 
forcibly made vacant by the departure of the 
Orientals. On one ranch alone 1600 crates 
are already a total loss. The growers and 
the people of Turlock join in a unanimous 
expression that the so-called American pick- 
ers, lead by one Shea, an ex-ballplayer, are 
a worthless, lazy, shiftless lot. The original 
loss in inflicted on the grower of melons who 
cannot get his crap picked at any price. An- 
other loss is inflicted on the people at large 
in an increased price for the melons mar- 
keted from other districts. The householder 
pays for the "fun" of the Turlock mob 
through his pocket. Forty or fifty potential 
Bolsheviks have gone a long way toward em- 
broiling this goverment in a row with Japan 
by breaking the covenants of our treaty with 
that nation which provide that the Japanese 
shall have equal rights in this country with 
the most favored of all nations. Some of 
the men concerned in this disgraceful affair 
have been arrested. They should have the 



fullest punishment inflicted on them for their 
actions. Governor Stephens and the District 
Attorney have taken the right stand. But 
there must be no letting up as far as the law- 
breakers are concerned, and all Japanese in 
Turlock or elsewhere must have the fullest 
protection gauranteed them under our treaty 
with Japan. Uncle Sam cannot afford to be 
made a welcher by a few discontented indi- 
viduals domiciled in California. 



The new law, which was supposed 
to prevent the use of shingles on 
houses, is to be construed as a dead 
letter. It is defective and will be in- 
terpreted much as anyone pleases, or 
not at all. 

The times are improving. Insur- 
ance men are breathing easier and 
fires are less frequent. The question 
of moral hazard has taken a back seat. 



Edmond Devillers, of the Nationale 
of Paris, is on an extended tour of 
Pacific Coast Cities. 

* * * 

Landis and Brickwell have a new 
British company. 



Up-to-Date Definitions 

The latest renditions of Modern 
Slang : 

An oil can is a guy who leaves bis 
rubbers on the radiator. 

A slob is a bimbo who eats onions 
and then gets confidential. 

A goof is a poor fish wlio borrows a 
cigarette and then gets sore because 

you haven't a match. 

A dumhell is a guy who buys ller- 
picide to use on bis hair. 

A bimbo is a guy who blows bis 
breath in your face after he has had 
some home-made hootch. 

A futzenheimer is a gink who doesn't 
drink coffee because the spoon bothers 

bis eye. 

A pineapple is a goof who t r i . 
gel wholesale rates on two-cent 
stamps, 

An egg i~ an oil can who start-, to 
tell a joke and then forgets the point. 

A yap is an egg who thinks that 
cold cream i^ kept in the refrigerator. 
— Carnegie Puppet. 



Vacations 

VACATIONS two kinds— 

with and without pay. 

Also with and without husban 

i Ctly, of -pending 
one's vacation. 

If one's wife is -hapely the vacation 
i- spent at the shore. 

If one's wife i- not — the vacati- 
spent in the mountains. 

That is why you see so many men. 



especially unattached men, at the 

sin ll'.'. 

Vacations at the shore consist in get- 
ing sunburned and getting over it 

Vacations in the mountains consist 
of getting poison ivy and getting over 
it. 

In the mountain one looks at the 
scenery. At the shore the scenery is 
incidental. — Judge. 



Nasty Man — Mrs. Newlywed — Jack, 
will you meet mother at the station 
and show her the way home? You 
bet I will, dearest. Where does she 
live? — American Legion Weekly. 



Optimism of Candidates — "How's 
Sam Twobble getting along in his race 
for constable?" "He's greatly encour- 
aged." "Yes." "Three citizens ac- 
cepted cigars this morning and assured 
him of their support. Sam's predict- 
ing a groundswell." — Birmingham 
Age-Herald. 



A paradox of the picture theater is the 
fact that single folks won't take single seats, 
but married folks will! 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

stem of placing 
manuscripts tor publication, which is Im- 
portant to people who write. Frank 
criticism a nd rei Islo ava Liable. 

1174 Phelan Building San Francisco 



\A7Hl-"\ in Santa Clara Valley see the 
valley from the scenic electric lines. 
Trollcv trips start from San fose or 
Palo Alto. 

PENINSULA RAILWAY CO. 

SAN JOSE, CAL. 



IV c Stand for the Best in Business Training 



Munson fPf §1 School 




FOR 

Private Secretaries 

600 SUTTER ST. FRANKLIN 306 

* 




CoronA 

TM Pirton.l WntlPl HicMm" 

Fold It Up 
Take It With You 

Typewrite 

Anywhere 



Call or write for 
Booklet 
S50.O0-WITH CASE 

CORONA TYPEWRITER CO.. Inc. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 




PLyEASURD'S WAND 



Fun at the Alcazar 

The return engagement of "My Lady 
Friends" this week seems to meet with 
the entire approval of large Alcazar 
audiences. The cast is the same and 
the company again prove that they can 
distinguish themselves in light plays 
as well as in the more serious ones. 
Dudley Ayres and Gladys George head 
this uncommonly good group of play- 
ers that the Alcazar management has 
brought together for the purpose of 
giving to San Francisco a stock com- 
pany par excellence. Next week a mys- 
tery play is promised, and the name 
alone excites the fancy of those who 
enjoy being puzzled, — "The Unknown 

Woman." 

Orpheum's All-Round Show 

Seldom has there been a better bal- 
anced program at our leading vaude- 
ville theatre than the one that thous- 
ands have enjoyed this week. Percy 
Bronson and Winnie Baldwin in "Vis- 
ions of 1971" have a successful act full 
of fun and surprises. Bronson is a 
comedian of rare quality. The Chi- 
nese actress, Lady Tsen Mei, also ap- 
pears again, and her singing and imi- 
tations are very popular. "Any 
Home" with Jean Adair and an ade- 
quate company, is well written and 
well acted, a playlet that is well worth 
while. In the opinion of this critic, 
more of this kind of entertainment, 
that is to say, more clever one-act 
plays, would enhance the value of 
every vaudeville performance. Billy 
Frawley and Edna Louise present a 
jolly little dance-comedy that they call 
"It's All a Fake" and the Russian 
dancers are highly diverting. 



Savoy 

A sprightly bit of Irish comedy is 
Peggy Machree, from the pen of Mrs. 
Denis O'Sullivan. For the second week 
Garry McGary and Elsa Ryan are de- 
lighting audiences with their lively act- 
ing and pleasant songs, ably assisted 
by a chorus worth)' of mention. The 
staging is appropriate and the cos- 
tumes excellent. 

As Peggy, Miss Ryan gives a charm- 
ing interpretation of the care-free col- 
leen with matrimonial inclinations. 
She fairly radiates the spirit of Ireland. 
No more so than McGarry, however, 
and those wanting a real treat will not 
miss this entertaining little play. The 
several melodies are catchy and well 
done, especially in the third act, 'mid 
powdered wigs and laces. 



Obey Mo Wand but Pleasure's.— Tom Moore 



which is saying a lot these days. In 
fact, it has been a long time since we 
enjoyed a bit of comedy as much as 
"A Kiss in Time," with Wanda Haw- 
ley and T. R. Barnes. With a laugh in 
every foot, it is recommended for all 
ills. 

As a tribute to the late Enrico Caru- 
so, a special musical number is given 
with one of his records, a very pleasing 
combination for which we are indebt- 
ed to Severi. Irving Cummings in a 
short but thrilling tale of Canada, a 
pen comedy cartoon and the usual 
news items to the fine bill. 




tfW-UU.U.t 



California 

As always Fatty Arbuckle puts lots 
of action in his latest attempt. "Crazy 
to Marry". No description of Fatty as 
a medico is needed, and his acting with 
Bull Montana furnishes several laughs 
to the minute. 



Alcazar Attractions 

"The Unknown Woman", a mystery 
drama from the pen of Willard Mack. 
will be the attraction at the Alcazar 
Theatre beginning Sunday afternoon, 
August 14th. There is many a thrill 
in the four acts of this production 
which was staged with unusual suc- 
cess in New York with the author in 
the leading role. The story is one of 
political intrigue and the graft that 
sometimes goes with it. Interwoven 
is the love of a neglected woman for 
a man other than her husband and 
there comes a combination of circum- 
stances that finally allows her to mar- 
ry him. 

Gladys George will have a part call- 
ing for some emotional acting. She 
will be seen as the neglected wife who 
finally finds her happiness after num- 
erous ordeals. Dudley Ayers will be 
seen as a man falsely accused of mur- 
der about whose predicament the plot 
is drawn. Thomas Chatterton will be 
the politician, and Gladys Emmons, has 
been specially engaged for an import- 
ant part. Others in the cast will in- 
clude Florence Printy. Ben Erwav. 
Charles Yule and Bert Chapman. 

"My Lady Friends" is being revived 
at the Alcazar this week and the at- 
tendance justifies the judgment of the 
management in again presenting this 
most amusing play. Frank Mandel, 
the young San Francisco author, has a 
sufficient number of comical situations 
in the piece to have furnished material 
for a dozen farces. 



Imperial Orpheum's New Bill 

A long and most interesting bill Louise Dresser and Jack Gardner, 

greets the visitor this week. Every- two stars after a year in the movies, 

thing is good, including the feature — are to begin an engagement on Sunday 



night at the Orpheum. Their offering 
will consist of a group of songs spec- 
ially written for them. 

"A Lesson in Golf" will be a new 
turn in Vaudeville. Ed Flannigan and 
Alex Morrison will give it at the Or- 
pheum beginning Sunday evening. 
Morrison has negotiated the Los Ange- 
les Country Club. 18-hole course in 69. 
two under par. 

Others who will appear in the Or- 
pheum's new bill are: Samstead and 
Marion ; Jean Barrios in "Song Im- 
pressions"; Vera Berliner, celebrated 
violiniste; Ona Munson in her "Manly 
Revue" ; Jean Adair and Company in 
"Any Home"; Billy Frawley and Ed- 
na Louise in "Its All a Fake." 



Del Monte Golf Tournament 

The summer tournament on August 
12th to 14th. a new event on the Del 
Monte schedule is already attracting 
the notice of high class golf players. 
The tournament will run on three days 
with a qualifying round the first day 
and two rounds of match play on the 
following two days. It will act as a 
sort of preliminary to the state cham- 
pionship which falls on September 3rd 
to 11th. on the Del Monte and Pebble 
Beach courses. It will give the players 
a wonderful chance to get in some 
competitive practice before the big 
event of the year. 



Specialization in New Dances 

The Techau Tavern Orchestra spec- 
ializes in the very newest dance crazes 
both of New York and Europe. If you 
want to see the new "Camel Walk" 
that is the rage in Manhattan, or Par- 
is' favorite Fox Trot, "Mon Homme 
("My Man"), go to Techau Tavern. 
Those who know or want to learn 
these new steps will find the real spirit 
of their jazz in the syncopation of El- 
liston Ames' famous orchestra. 

The present edition of the Girl Revue 




j T <tKip^mnv&\aut \ w " 



MA Ji,f ES 25 AND 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 

AND THE SAME GREAT SHOWS 

Smoking permitted in dress circle 
and loges 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR AUGUST 13, 1921 



17 



is meeting with high favor because of 
costuming. The special "dance wheel" 
feature is a favorite, and prizes now 
are Melachrino Cigarettes and Gruen- 
hagen's celebrated Blue Ribbon Choc- 
olates. 

The after supper hour because of the 
daintiness and delicious variety of dish- 
es served, is sure to see a throng at 
Techau Tavern while many enjoy plan- 
ning to dine and stay through the en- 
tire evening, dancing and watching the 
Revue — having their dinner and the- 
atre party in one. 



art can furnish eir perfect service can 
place upon the table. All for 85 cents. 
Who talks about high cost of living? 



Sudden Death of "Jack" Spreckels 

The death of "Jack" D. Spreckels by 
the overturning of his limousine on the 
highway near Taft, was a shock to 
society this week. He had driven 
alone from Caricopa Flats to obtain 
mechanics for oil wells he and his fa- 
ther John D. Spreckels owned there. 
When aid reached him he was 
still conscious but died in a hospital at 
Bakersfield, after an emergency oper- 
ation. His car had rolled over him 
and torn away seventy feet of the fence 
along the highway. 

In 1914 he was divorced by his first 
wife, Edith Huntington, by whom he 
had three children. In 1915 the young 
capitalist married Miss Sadie Wirt an 
entertainer who recently filed suit for 
divorce against him. She figured not 
long ago in the arrest of a former 
army officer, "Hand me" Bill Barrett 
whom she charged in Paris with having 
stolen a pearl necklace valued at $100,- 
000. 

Death of Popular Financier 

Death has been busy amongst our 
prominent and representative citizens 
of San Francisco this week. R. F. 
Mulcahy, fur many years foremost in 
financial circles passed away on Mon- 
day, at Adler Sanitarium, following an 
illness of eight months. 

Mr. Mulcahv was born in Adrian. 
Mich., in 1857. his father being a rail- 
road official. In 18 Mulcahy 
came to California and engaged in the 
brokerage business I en years ago he 
became connected with the firm of E. 
!•". Mutton and Company, and shortly 
after he was made a partner. To 

that lie made an arm} of friends would 
In- to understate the case. Every 

client became his friend. 

The popular financier is survived by 
bis widow, and two daughters, Mrs. 
Ira Luther of Oakland and Mrs Alene 
Burns of Buffalo, X. Y. 



At a Fairmont Luncheon 
\ seat at the window with superb 
view of San Francisco bay and the 

magnificent expanse, of bay and 
mountain beyond. That is what the 
Fairmont Hotel offers you when you 
in there for lunch, or better still 
if you happen to be a regular guest. 
And the lunch — the best that culinary 



The Play's the Thing Says Geo. Arliss. 

The struggle between the managers 
and actors in New York still continues 
to be strenuous without either side 
seeming to have a solution of the 
problem of reducing costs of produc- 
tion without decrease of salaries for 
stars. 

George Arliss the fine actor who is 
well remembered in San Francisco by 
his performance of Disraeli declares 
that salaries cannot be cut. He says : 
"How many weeks of the year does 
the actor actually receive pay, strik- 
ing a general average?" Mr. Arliss 
was asked. 

"I don't know. Possibly twenty. 
But let us say twenty-six, half the 
year. That is, I am sure, a high esti- 
mate. On that basis you will discov- 
er if you take a pencil and a sheet of 
foolscap that the actor who receives 
a weekly salary of $150 (and this is 
above the average wage) has in reality 
only $75 a week the year round. 

"Would you say that the actor is 
improvident?" he asked. 

"I firmly believe that actors and ac- 
tresses as a class are more thrifty than 
the rank and file of any other business 
or profession. The improvident actor 
is as much a thing of the past as the 
green room of the theatre. Of course. 
you may point to a score of thriftless 
actors, but they are not indicative of 
the whole. You see there is a great 
temptation to the man who is receiv- 
ing $150 a week to live up to it while 
he is getting it — to believe that he is 
reallv getting $7,800 a year instead of 
$3900. 

"But the actor seldom gives way to 
that delusion. He is extraordinarily 
careful under difficult conditions. If 
he could receive his $150 for twenty- 
six consecutive weeks and then have 
twenty-six weeks of idleness, and 
knew in advance that this was to hap- 
pen, he might make better use of his 
time and money. But it is the uncer- 
tainty that makes it so difficult for 
him. 

"Salaries of the rank and file are not 
exorbitant. They may be higher than 
the manager can afford to pay under 
present conditions. But I don't see 
how the actor is to live decently on 
less. It i "bit: into the ques- 

tion of the verj big salaries: they are 
big because of special value and it is 
entirely for the individual manager to 
decide whether he cares to pay for that 
special value. 

"Perhaps if the managers would not 
try to go each other one better in the 
extravagance of their mountings, he 
content with a plain, straightforward 
performance, there could be more 
ing and a better economic situation as 
a result. 

"There is no doubt that the play is 



the first necessity. No bad play was 
ever carried to success by an actor 
unless there was something good in it. 
But the actor is the next in order. If 
we can't get actors cheap we must pay 
the price. Salaries are governed by 
the law of supply and demand, and I 
am afraid it will be a long time before 
there are enough good actors to allow 
of their being marked down." 



Dancing Partners for Rent 

On the subject of renting young men 
to act as dancing partners for dow- 
agers of dubious age and pronounced 
plumpness, not to use a less pleasing 
word. Helen Bullitt Lowery writes in 
the New Y'ork Times : 

"God help the woman who stands 
on the crest of the Great Divide who 
still wants the attention of men — but 
whom men have ceased attending be- 
cause nobody else is going to help her 
— least of all, her own masculine con- 
temporaries. 

"For man is blessed with a magic 
faculty of dropping back decade by 
decade until the women he dances 
with never pass 35. 

"Why do you never select women 
of your own age?", I asked a batche- 
lor of 45. 

'Their backs aren't supple and they 
are so bundled up in whalebone they 
can't get the nuances of the music,' " 
he began — then stopped to think. " 'Yet 
there are some few of the older women 
that are as good dancers as the girls — 
only the flappers have dancing plus 
thing else.' 

"The lounge-lizard type of profes- 
sional dancer who played parasite to 
stout women in diamonds and tried to 
implicate them in compromising sit- 
uations has passed, but there has come 

in his place thi cool-headed young bus- 
man who charges for his services 
in cold hard cash — and throws in no 
conversation along with his toes. 

" 'Why should they expect enter- 
tainment?' " exclaims such a 
stroking his Continental mustache. 



Phones Sutter 3169. Kearny 4978 

United Flower & Supply Co., Inc. 

FLORISTS 

We grow our own stock and. with ex- 
tensive nurseries to draw from, can 
give unusual values. It will pay 
you to view our flowers and 
prices. 

street Francisco 



ELECTROLYSIS 



wariH and 
»d roulU] 



MADAM STIVER 

133 Geary Street. Suite "23 Whitney Building 

Oakland. Suite 424. First Nat. Bank Building 

- 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 




A POET'S LECTURES. 

Discussion of Japan and America is 
enlisting the pens of many authors in 
many lands. Now comes our own Jap- 
anese literary friend, the Poet Yone 
Noguchi, once a prominent figure in 
San Francisco's Latin Quarter, and 
now Professor of English Literature 
in Keio University in his native land. 
His lectures in book form have been 
issued. 

It would be impossible for so talent- 
ed a writer as Noguchi to treat any 
subject in an uninteresting manner and 
especially those that he has treated 
in his book "Japan and America", 
issued from the Keio University Press. 
Naturally, being a true poet, Noguchi 
is less inclined to deal with political 
conditions in Japan and America, than 
with the literary tendencies and de- 
velopments in these countries. The 
whole tenor of the Poet's book is fra- 
ternal. He breathes the spirit of in- 
ternational friendliness. As a cosmo- 
politan in the true and broad sense, he 
is able to see the merits and deficien- 
cies of his own country as well as 
of ours. His native courtesy, which in 
educated Japanese is always a delight- 
ful characteristic, prevents him from 
being quite as candid perhaps as some 
things deserve. His criticisims and 
forecasts are, however, interesting and 
decidedly useful ; for it is always an 
advantage to see ourselves as others 
see us, when the observer is a stranger 
of education and genius. 

In the exact sense, Noguchi cannot 
be regarded as a stranger for in 1893, 
having been graduated from Keio Gi- 
juki University he came to California 
and fell under the spell of that wonder- 
ful "Poet of the Sierras," Joaquin Mil- 
ler. To the genius of the famous Wes- 
tern singer, the young Japanese stu- 
dent paid Oriental tribute and remain- 
ed three years with the "Hermit of the 
Heights". During that time the Japa- 
nese writings appeared in a periodical 
edited by Gelett Burgess of San Fran- 
cisco, and aroused the astonishment of 
Ameicans by their poetic quality and 
facility of expression in a language 
not the author's own. 

Having explored all California, in- 
cluding the Yosemite wonderland, No- 
guchi went to England where he won 
the favor of the literati by his writings. 
After eleven years of travel and ob- 
servation he returned to his birth 
place and has become a professor in 
the University where he obtained his 
degrees. In 1913 he again visited Eng- 



land and lectured on Japanese poetry 
at Oxford University. 

Professor Noguchi regards Japanese 
politics as in a state of rapid transition. 
Japan is strugling to free itself from 
bureaucracy and attain a new patriot- 
ism which is not a seven-headed Fetish, 
to be obeyed implicitly, right or wrong, 
in blind unquestioning silence. New 
Japan is a creation of the West. Shin- 
toism or ancestor worship is losing its 
old dignity in the face of Western lit- 
erature. 

The poet foresees the growth of a 
great school of American literature on 
the Pacific Coast. The literary centre 
has shifted from New England and the 
California environment with its rivers, 
ocean, mountains and climate, is con- 
genial. 

SEX STUDIES. 

There is sure to be discussion over 
Dr. William Stowell's book, "Sex", 
which has been published by the Mc- 
Millan Company of New York. It is 
announced as a work for parents and 
teachers. Do they need it? The au- 
thor , a medical man believes that the 
need is imperative, and he has prepared 
his work with prudence and perfect 
knowledge. If teachers and parents 
desire to place in the hands of juvenile 
readers accurate information on the 
subject of procreation, they cannot find 
a better medium than "Sex." 

It is really a text-book replete with 
biological and physiological facts, writ- 
ten in a manner calculated to arouse, 
only interest in the wonders of Nature. 

"It was the custom to hide the facts 
of reproduction from children. Fairy 
tales of storks dropping babies down 
chimneys, served to lull the curiosity 
of toddlers who suddenly saw a new 
occupant of a cradle in the home. At 
present there is an active movement to 
diffuse physiological facts in the 
schools and homes. Many intelligent 
and worthy people, however, are op- 
posed on the grounds that children 
learn soon enough, and that the sex 
question has alredy become too over- 
powering. The movies reek with it, 
the novels are rank with it, the daily 
press with its divorce scandals is redo- 
lent of sexual inclinations and excen- 
tricities. Do the schools need to in- 
clude studies on sex under the disguise 
of biological lectures? It would seem 
that the schools have more than they 
can attend to already, and the home is 
the place where subjects of an intimate 
nature should be discussed. If parents 
are dubious of their power to teach 
their children thev cannot do better 



AUGUST 13, 1921 

than read Dr. Stowell's admirable 
book. It will give them much useful 
knowledge with the least possible ef- 
fort. The price is $3.00. 



Mrs. Orzo William Childs, accom- 
panied by her daughter, Miss Emme- 
leen Childs, arrived at Fairmont Hotel 
Tuesday afternoon to visit here a fort- 
night before continuing on to their 
former home in Los Angeles. 



She — Enthusiasm is contagious. 
He — Not always. I've courted girls 
who didn't share my enthusiasm in the 
leat. 

Census Man (to tramp) — Now, lets 
see, what's your religion? Tramp — 
Oh, stick me down a Roaming Cath'lic. 



BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old Poodle Dog 

Luncheon 75c 

Served Daily— 11 to 2 

OIhhjsi- fuil-Hi/eil portions frmn lur^e menu. 

which is changed every day 

Excellent Food — Beautiful Environment 

Prompt Service 

French Dinner $1.50 

Including tax, week days and Sundays, 
5 to 9 i). m. 

DANCING 

421 BUSH STREET, Above Kearny 

Phone: Douglas 2411 



( ipni Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 
65 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4536 San Francisco, Calif. 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 
French and Italian Dinners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



.For that stubborn cough use 
Old Snake Doctor's Cough Remedy 

SNAKE DRUG CO. 

Formerly G. Leipnitz & Co. 

Now Located at 
127-129 KEARNY STREET 



PENINSULAR PATRONAGE SOLICITED 

Post-Taylor Garage, Inc. 

530 TAYLOR STREET 
I 3 

Washing and Greasing Cars in a 
careful and efficient manner 



"The House uf Quality" 

GOLDEN GATE DAIRY LUNCH 

Block & McDonald, Props. 
SERVICE SUPREME HOME COOKING 

172 EDDY STREET 

Visit them after the show and meal times 

Prices Reasonable 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 

Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of 
Proprietors 



24,655.500.00 
16.750.000.00 



Aggregate Assets, 30th 
September, 1920 




$362,338,975.00 

SIR JOHN RUSSELL FRENCH, K. B. E., General Manager 

357 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian States, New Zealand, Fiji, Papua 

(New Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of Australasian 

Banking Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged 



Head Office 
GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 



London Office 
29 THREADNEEDLE STREET, E. C. 2 
Agents: 
Bank of California, National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bank, Crocker Nat'l Bank 



Member Federal Reserve System and Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS 526 California Street, San Francisco, Calif. COMMERCIAL 

Mission Branch, Mission and Ills! Streets 

Park-Presidio District Branch, Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

Hainht Street Branch, Hai^li! ami r.rlv. alete Streets 

JUNE 30th, 1921 

Assets $71,383,431.14 Capital Actually Paid Up $1,000,000.00 

Deposits 67,792,431.14 Reserve and Conting't F'ds 2,591,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund $357,157.85 

OFFICERS 

JOHN A. BUCK, President; GEO. TOURNY. Vlce-Fres. an, I Manager; A. H. R. SCHMIDT, 
Vice-Fres. and Cashier; E. T. KItlJSE, Vice-President; A. II MULLER, Secretary; WM, 
D. NEWHOfSE, Assistant s.aa.-tary; WILLIAM HERRMANN, GEO. SCHAMMEL, G. A. 
BELCHER, R. A. LAUENSTEIN, Assistant Cashiers; C. \v HEYER, Manager Missi.m 
Branch: w. C. HEYER, Manager Park-Presidio District Branch; O, P. PAULSEN", Manager 
Haight Street Branch. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
JOHN A. BUCK. GE(i. TOURNY, B. T. KRUSE, A. II K. SCHMIDT, I. N. WALTER, 
HUGH QOODPELLOW, A. HAAS, E, N. VAN BEROEN, ROBERT DOLLAR. B. A 

CHRISTENSON, L. S. SHERMAN; GOODFELLOW, EELLS M IE ,>;- ORRICK, Genera] 

Attorneys. 



BOND DEPARTMENT 

TIM-; ANGLO .WD LONDON-PARIS 

NATIONAL BANK 



Sutter and Sansome Streets 
Phone Kearny 5600 

Calif. 



A7 COMM1 \ 

Irrigation District Bonds 

INVl STMENT 

THEY ARE more secure than first mortgages because they rank ahead of 
first mortgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT 

Yield from 6% to 6%% 

Let us send you our booklet THE IRRIGRATION DISTRICT BOND 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

Hi: \n t IFFICE, It IRONTO, C \\ \n \ 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIA1 BANKING ["ransa 

Bought, FOREIGN ami DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 
\ \ni \\ COLLECTIONS romptly and at REASONABLE RA 

485 BRANCHES ["HROUGHOI I I WADA, and at LONDON. ENG.; NEW YORK; 
PORT] VND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXIl 

San Francisco Office: 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE. Manager W. J. COULTHARD. Assistant Manager 



San Francisco Law School 

Tlii' 
Evening Sessions for Men and Women. 
7:30 to 9:30 
Applications for enrollment are being re- 

ptember IS, 

Write Today for Catalog 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 

Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 




N. W, CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



Normandie Garage 

Gough and Sutter Streets 

Washing and Polishing Day and Nighl 

Cars Oiled and Greased 

Crank Cases Drained Free 

Home Garage Trade Solicit! d 



Phone Fillmore 4815 



Old Hampshire Bond 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 
Tin- Standard Paper for Business Stationery. 
"Made a little better than si ssary." 

The typewriter papers arc Bold in atti 
ami durable boxes containing five hundred 
I sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The 
manuscript covers are sold in similar 

hundred sheets. Order 

iur printer nr stationer, or, 
1. we will send a sample booh showing 
the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

37-45 First Street San Francisco 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 
should leave the city without 
ing in the finest cafe in America 
Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) . 75c 
Dinner $1.75 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSONBROS.CO.,Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklin and Cough 

Telephone Park 271 



Correct 
Clothes 



Of good taste and refine- 
ment — and they hold their 
own against any compe- 
tition today, tomorrow 
and every day of the year. 
The fullest measure of 
value. 

HASTINGS 

Clothing Company 



Post Street at Kearnv 



San Francisco 



Gentlewomen— 

A trade that is of 

great importance: 

THE CARE OF THE HAIR 

THE CARE OF THE FACE 

THE CARE OF THE NAILS 

Hairdressing Marceling 
Cosgrove's Hair Store 

Established 25 years 

360 Geary Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

Pliune: KEARNY 3842 

Berkeley Store: 2331 Telegraph Ave. 



Eyes Guaranteed 

Bother OO Work at 
You? 27 7th St. 

DR.J.P.JUHL 





VAN AUK V 4CUUM CLEANER 




AND G *VER 




Please Note the Followiny Features: 


m 


1 Jt 


1 — Keeps the ear clean ami sanitary. 

'1 — Saves twenty-live per cent in consumption of gas. 

Cleans the engine by running Kerosene through 

the Vacuum into the motor. 
1— Cleans flirt and dust out of the outside casing 

in changing 1 In -. 
5 — Makes adjustment of air pressure easy at any 

altitude. 


^L 




FOR SALE BY ALL DEALERS 




Price Complete $15.00. Installed $1 7.50 




Manufactured By 


Cleaner Complete 

A Perfect Cleaner for Automobiles 

Efficient — Economical 


VAN AUTO VACUUM COMPANY 

135 Hyde Street, San Francisco, Calif. 
Phone Prospect 132 



Spend Your Vacation 

BEAUTIFUL FEATHER RIVER COUNTRY 

THOUSANDS OF FEET ABOVE THE LEVEL OF THE SEA IN" Till-; 

HEART OF THE SIERRAS 

Reached via 

WESTERN PACIFIC RAILROAD 

"The Feather River Route" 

Numerous Resorts along the famous FEATHER RIVER and near the 

many lakes and streams where fish and game are abundant 

Write fur Illustrated Folders 

Ticket Offices: 50 POST STREET and FERRY BUILDING— Telephone Sutter 1651 



Ban iFranrisw (fihrmttrip 



Leading Newspaper of the Pacific Coast 



A Newspaper made every day 

TO SPEAK TO 

Every member of every family 

Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for $1.15 a month- 
including Sunday editions 

Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postmaster 



18 Powell Street 

Near Market Street 



We Welcome You 



136 O'Farrell Street 

Opposite Orpheum Theatre 



CLINTON CAFETERIAS 

BREAKFAST :: LUNCH :: :: DINNER 

Courteously serves its patrons with good food at moderate prices 
in pleasant surroundings and with excellent music 




J. B. CROWE 

3652 GEARY, at 1st Ave. 1055 Post St., at Polk 

PHONE FRANKLIN 7445 

AUTOMOBILE fl „ f 11 IT* 'l GLAZING 
BUILDING UlaSS 01 all KindS BEVELING 



SVC 




AND 

(California AbttprttBrr 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



SATURDAY, AUGUST 20, 1921 



&5.00 PER YEAR 



The Ford 
Corne 




A New Building with Greater Service and Sales Facilities 

One of the most modern automobile structures in the country is the new building occupied by the 

WILLIAM L. HUGHSON COMPANY 



MARKET AT ELEVENTH -THE FORD CORNER 

Daj and Nl(lil Sewict Larfr SfrnW P »|wu liw iri lam* 1 >p.- Ha M*»tj Full Sat* of Pan, loj.ooo «n*jr< Itti dVrornl io F..r.i ,,.<■ 



<jforzc6 



DEALERS SINCE HW 



Market at Eleventh — Phone Park 4380 
US PORTLAND SAN FRANCISCO .... . ■ OAKLAND LOS U WECO 




No moreBattejy worries 



SERVICE 

for all makes of 

STORAGE 

BATTERIES 

Bringyourbattery 
problems here. 



The "J-E" Battery is the only battery on the 
market that needs no attention — it never 
needs water. The plates can't buckle — over- 
charging can't hurt it — it never sulphates. 
The "J-E" Battery has more power and 
more pep. 

The "J-E" Battery costs no more than the 
best liquid batteries and is unconditionally 
guaranteed for 18 months. 
Get one in your car today. Then Forget It. 



"J-E" BATTERY COMPANY of the Pacific Coast 

1220 Poat Street SAN FRANCISCO Phone Franklin 664 



^ 



6* 



sea. 




99 

Battery 

Requires no Water 



1 




J. B. CROWE 

3652 GEARY, at 1st Ave. 1055 Post St., at Polk 

PHONE FRANKLIN 7445 

building Glass of all Kinds beveling 



Spend Your Vacation 

IN THE 

BEAUTIFUL FEATHER RIVER COUNTRY 

THOUSANDS OF FEET ABOVE THE LEVEL OF THE SEA IX THE 

HEART OF THE SIERRAS 

Reached via 

WESTERN PACIFIC RAILROAD 

"The Feather River Route" 

Numerous Resorts along .the famous FEATHER RIVER and near the 

many lakes and streams where fish and game are abundant 

Write for Illustrated Folders 

Ticket Offices: 50 POST STREET and FERRY BUILDING-Telephone Sutter 1651 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Company in America" 
FIRE, AUTOMOBILE, WINDSTORM 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 
LIBERAL CONTRACTS REASONABLE RATES 



PYRO-VOID 

Dr.Hoagland's Home Treatment 
... for ... 

PYORRHEA 

Package with full directions sent 
in plain wrapper for One Dollar 

Satisfaction Guaranteed or Money Refunded 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

Dental Specialist 

908 Market Street, at Powell 

San Francisco 

Dept. N. L. Established 1903 

SAVE YOUR TEETH 



An Ounce of Prevention Is 
Worth Many Pounds of 
Ten - mile - from - no- 
where -regret 

Let our expert automobile 
electricians inspect your 
starting, lighting and igni- 
tion systems regularly. It's 
the best insurance against a 
breakdown at an important 
moment. 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 

MASTER AUTOMOBILE 
ELECTRICIANS 

955 Post Street SAN FRANCISCO 



CYCOL 

MOTOR OIL 



MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
Ihe new HEXEON ' 
process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

San Francisco 



V I N O B A R ! 

THE BRICK WITH THE KICK 

Make Your Own — It Is Simple 

Guaranteed not to make Vinegar 

VINOBAR MFG. CO., San Francisco 

536-38 WASHINGTON STREET 
Agents Wanted 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 1856 




FgANCItCo 




111 



Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




VOL. XCIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, AUGUST 20, 1921 



No. 34 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building, Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco. Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco. 
Calif., Post Office as second-class mail matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year $5.00. Foreign One 
year. $6.00; Canada, one year. $6.00. 



NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not be 
responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 



Our city is horrified by the atrocious murder of a 

clergyman. + + ^ 

But remember fellow citizens 15,000 murders occur 

every year in Amercia. And hangings are rare. 

* * * 

Is it not a frightful record in a land where such vast 

sums are spent for public schools, colleges and churches? 

* * * 

Prohibition was to stop all crimes, and fill the wicked 

with worthy thoughts. We see few signs of reformation. 

* * * 

San Francisco cannot advance unless we abolish our 

present city charter, which fills the City Hall with taxeaters. 

* * * 

Democracy having no traditions and no standards of 

civic excellence, must inevitably level clown instead of Up. 

* * * 

Success of the Open Shop continues though our mu- 
nicipal government is trying hard to kill it. 

* * * 

All employees of the San Francisco Hoard of Works. 

are assessed heavily, to finance the' union fight against Open 
Shop. * + + 

The labor "leaders," with mansions on "Statesman's 

Hill" and large salaries are not hurt by the building trades 
strike. ^ + + 

The Closed Simp of the Labor Trust, demoralizing 

American industrialism is responsible for much of our dete- 
rioration. .{, .}, + 

Judging by the number of Pacific toast wrecks our 

manners must lie suffering from what Edison calls "Mental 

atrophy." + * + 

Not since \ igilante days, has San Francisco been po- 
litically on a lower grade than under the Labor Trust. City 

Hall regime. + + + 

The extravagant old political bosses ran our city for 

six million dollars a year. The present machine wants about 
thirty millions. + + + 

The attempt of the Hoard of Works to spend $400,000 

on unnecessary street work to give strikers easj 
a crime against the cit) 



Are the yellow newspapers going to make the sus- 
pected murderer of Father Heslin a spectacular hero and 
run him for public office? 

* ♦ * 

Some scientists say the end of the world will be univer- 
sal madness. Judging by our State and Municipal govern- 
ments how far have we gone? 

* ♦ ♦ 

Graft and stupidity it is said threaten to bankrupt New 

York. We certainly can offer no valuable suggestions from 
overtaxed, trust-ridden San Francisco. 
+ * * 

William A. Hightower, accused of the murder of a 

priest "slept soundly in his cell," say the newspapers. 
Why not? Murderers have little to fear. 

* * * 

Woodrow Wilson was always prattling about a world 

"safe for Democracy." The world has never been safe from 
Democracy. Read history and learn for yourselves. 

* + * 

Is Los Angeles stating facts about the American Can 

Company's making twice as many cans there as in San 
Francisco, though most of the cans are used here? 

* * * 

The "Ku-Klux-Klan" organizers in Oakland are defiant 

and will not take orders to move out. If they do tpiit, 
they should leave their stock of tar and feathers to San 
Francisco. + + + 

Kerensky seems to be getting close to the United 

States treasury again. How about that unpaid $60,000,000 
Wilson gave the Petrograd Politician when he was boss for 
about fifteen minutes. 

* + + 

"A Daniel come to judgment." Dist. Attorney Brady 

savs the murderer of Father Heslin is entitled to the re- 
ward for showing where the victim was buried. The Su- 
preme Bench is Brady's proper place. 

* + * 

Judging by Mr. Hightower's sinister activities we may 

hear, that the murder has advanced to the stage where 
incorporation papers will be filed and stock sold m the 
"Amalgamated Murderer's Association." 

* ♦ ♦ 

Looks as if the reporters were the real detectives in 

that Salada Beach murder case. Outside of drawing their 
salaries and having their "picters took." what do the police 
do for all the money the taxpayers pat up? 
+ ♦ ♦ 

A hostile billiard-ball, aimed by a striking plasterer, has 

shattered the beautiful portrait of Emperor I'. H. McCarthy 
in the very Temple of the Building Trade Council. The 
crowns of royalty are perilous ornaments these da; 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 




E/DITORIAk GO 




The raising of Spring Val- 
More Robbery of Taxpayers ley Water rates twenty per 

cent means, first of all that 
San Francisco tenants will have their rents increased. 
There is a scarcity of houses and the landlords are already 
carrying all the load they can stagger under, in the form 
of taxes and upkeep. Will they calmly pay their increased 
water rate and stand the loss? Nothing of the kind. They 
will notify the tenants that an increase of rents will be 
necessary, and one more lesson will be given the public that 
the consumer always pays. 

The rates of the SpringValley Company were far too high 
before the Board of Railroad Commissioners approved of 
an increase of twenty per cent. Wherever the Water 
Company could find technical reasons for installing meters, 
water was measured out to consumers and charged to the 
last drop. Imagine what a means of reaching property- 
owners pockets that method is. 

Tenants are not at all conscientious about conserving the 
water supply and protecting the landlord's pockets. An 
imperfect toilet, allowed to run for a day or so, would make 
a large hole in the rent of a small tenement for a month, 
when the water is measured and charged for at the meter 
rates. The unfairness of permitting a water company to 
charge meter rates, as has been done in San Francisco, 
is apparent to any intelligent honest investigator. 

To begin with the Water Company pays nothing for the 
water itself which drops from the skies in rain, or wells out 
of the hills. A retaining dam having been built, at compar- 
atively small cost, the company which assumes to "own" 
the heaven-sent water can sit down and begin to cut off 
the coupons. 

Every little shower from the heavens which falls on 
the reservoir is converted into golden drops the unhappy 
property owner supplying the gold. But every drop of this 
fluid from the skies which costs the water company nothing, 
comparatively speaking, is charged against the owner of a 
leaky toilet, as carefully as if it were molten gold. If the 
property owner objects the water supply is cut off at once 
and he is practically without redress, for the forces against 
which he must contend are too powerfully intrenched. 

That the Spring Valley Company has obtained an increase 
of twenty per cent on its high rates is virtually an an- 
nouncement that it will not go to the polls with another 
scheme to get all the remaining Hetch Hetchy bonds in the 
treasury. There are in fact few bonds left. Eighteen 
million dollars worth of them were disposed of the other 
day and nothing said about how much discount was allowed 
the contractors who bought them.. Nominally, of course, 
contractors who take public bonds pay par for them and 
the Auditor's and Treasurer's books seem all right. The 
secret usually can be found in the fact that the contractors 
were allowed to charge more for the work than they would 
demand on a hard cash arrangement. Many of our school 
houses are said to have been built on that plan — the con- 
tractors taking bonds for their work and charging more for 
it. That is a ruinous arrangement but characteristic of 
municipal dealings in cities swamped with debt and unable 
to sell their bonds except at a discount. 

In the last attempt of the Spring Valley Company to 
unload its property on the people, by an election, it was 
loudly announced by the municipal advocates of the deal, 
and by the Water Company itself, that having bought the 
property the people would have no further load of expense 



to meet. Now, however, the Water Company pleads pov- 
erty and is granted an enormous raise of twenty per cent 
to help meet the betterments required for adequate service. 
The history of the Spring Valley Company is one which 
has not made the people of San Francisco proud of the 
hungry corporation. It seems consistent in its Shylockian 
policy of a pound of gold for every sixteen ounces of pure 
water it possesses. 

The attempt to bolster up the outrageous in- 
crease of Spring Valley rates by City Attorney 
Lull's opinion that it is proper and necessary is 
Attorney Lull's opoinion that it is proper and necessary is 
only calculated to damn the entire buiness in the eyes 
of the intelligent taxpayers. The City Attorney's office 
is one of the reliable cogs in the municipal machine. "Get 
Attorney Lull's opinion on the matter," is always the cry 
of the City Hall politicians when preparing some scheme to 
make the municipality more intolerable. And invariably 
the voice from the Attorney's office is the voice of extrav- 
agance. 

One would think that the City Attorney's office would 
have been kept out of the miserable fiasco our city lawyers 
made of the lawsuit in the Federal court. 



The railroads contend that it 
The Taxpayers Have Rights is unfair to permit motor 

transportation lines to oper- 
ate automobiles free on the State highways — that is virtu- 
ally tax free. Of course that is fundamentally true. No 
person who is entitled to pa}' taxes should be allowed to 
dodge his responsibility. 

One of the evils of present government, is that taxdodgers 
escape, and the unfortunate small property owner is saddled 
with more of the load of taxation than he should shoulder. 

In the next year or so, the American people will be 
brought face to face with the problems of taxation as 
never before. Taxes are eating up the vitality of the na- 
tion. Taxeaters are parasites on the public who drain it 
of its life. 

Public government should be a matter of business, like 
running a store or factory but we have let it become a 
matter of political graft. The politicians whom we elect 
to office regard their victory like oriental Satraps, who 
extract from their hapless subjects the last cent they can 
extract. How much longer we can follow that plan of 
politics, is the question. Signs warn us that if we do not 
change our course we shall hit the rocks of bankruptcy. 

One of the causes of public expense has been the build- 
ing of highways, which we greatly needed. They cost a 
large sum and large amounts will be required to keep the 
highways in repair. Who shall pay for that work. 

Certainly it would be very foolish to permit motor 
transportation companies to use the highways, that have 
cost taxpayers such vast sums, and contribute unfairly to 
the upkeep. The amount of taxation which the motor 
transportation companies must stand will have to be 
settled. 

The late legislature passed a bill imposing a tax of two 
per cent on the gross revenue of motor transportation 
lines. The original bill as introduced in the legislature, set 
the tax at seven per cent. The governor pocketed the biil 
and so the important matter remains unsettled. The matter 
is being considered by Chambers of Commence, County 
Supervisors and committees. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR AUGUST 20. 1921 



Not long' ago it was considered correct politics to adopt 
any course which seemed likely to hurt railroads and force 
them into government ownership. But the war has changed 
that idea, for the roads under public ownership, were never 
worse nor a greater handicap to the farming and commer- 
cial interests of the nation. 

The points to be considered in the treatment of motor 
transportation by taxpayers of all kinds are: 

(1). Should the State Government be permitted to 
make a present of the State Highways to any class of 
people, wdio use them for business, and subject them to con- 
siderable wear? 

(2) Does the competition of the motor transportation 
vehicles on the Highways reduce the Railroads receipts, 
and therefore lessen the taxes the Railroads pay into the 
public treasury? 

Our State Board of Equalization, in its last report, 
asserts that motor transportation hurts the railroads. Much 
of the motor business is done on highways that parallel the 
steam railroads and electric lines. In 1920 the receipts of 
357 motor transportaiton lines aggregated over eight-and- 
a-half million dollars, and there were 220 lines that had not 
furnished reports to the Board of Equalization. If the rail- 
roads had had no competition, and collected that eight- and- 
a-half million dollars the State could have collected taxes 
on it. The tax under the King bill would be 7 per cent. 

It is evident that from the taxpayer's standpoint this 
question of competition of motor lines and railroad lines 
is of great importance. It will have to be settled in a fair 
way and no doubt the united Chambers of Commerce and 
the other influential bodies will be able to reach a proper 
solution. 

One of the instructive but woeful re- 
Protect the Public suits of the war. is the inability of 
millions to find work in America, a 
land of great natural richness where everybody should be 
making a comfortable living. 

The Republican administration is trying to protect Amer- 
ican labor, and in fact that has been the aim of the Republi- 
can party since its organization. The principal schemes 
before the present Congress are, how to make reduction ol 
immigration effective, and what sort of tariff shall be 
adopted. 

The theory of reduction of immigration is that it must be 
enforced to prevent the dumping of superfluous labor on 
our shores. Furthermore, the cessation of the immigrant 
tide will enable the over-taxed "smclting-pot" to assim- 
ilate the large quantity of un-Americanized raw material 
which has accumulated in the large cities. 

There is little difference about the curtailment of immi- 
gration, but there is a vast difference in the opinions of 
what we need in the form of protective tariff. 

That the tariff should be amply protective is the Republi- 
can idea, based upon the logical theory, that it is useless 
to talk of limiting immigration, if we permit the 

made by poorly paid European labor to be dumped on our 

markets without judicious restriction. 

To make the tariff so high that it should cause practical 
prohibition of imports, would, of course, be highly pleasing 

to predatory trusts, that delight in robbing the pubtic, and 

they have given the American public illuminative examples 
of their unprincipled rapacity in the past few years. 

There is now a powerful effort to deliver the public. 
bound and gagged, into the hands of the clothing profiteers 
by shutting out English cloth. Never have the American 
weavers produced reliable cloths of grades equal to those 
imported from the best class ,,f English mills, 
existence. 



Why is this? Is the English weaver so far the superior 
of the American worker that it is impossible to compete 

with him? Not at all. Manj English weavers come to 

America, but their handiwork here is no better than what 
the natives accomplish. The fact is that the greatest profits 
are in the production of cheap shoddy goods. American 
cloth manufacturers, of the class which considers large 
profits preferable to quality and reasonable gain, place in the 
markets goods apparently cheaper than the English cloths, 
but really very dear. The native cloths lack wool, and the 
cotton of which they are made is badly dyed and far from 
durable. The American tailoring is, however, of high class, 
and the clothing of inferior material finds a ready and 
profitable market. 

In first class stores some attempt is made to protect 
customers, but speaking in general terms, the clothing 
business offers enormous opportunities to unscrupulous 
manufacturers. 

In other important lines, a protective tariff can easily be 
stretched so as to be made prohibitory and furnish manu- 
facturers fabulous profits. The enormous fortunes of the 
Pittsburg steel-makers in the decade before the war, were 
proof that the tariff gave them undue advantage at the 
public expense. 

It is consoling to the American public to know that we 
have in the White House, a President who can lie trusted 
to deal with any tariff bill in the way he deems best for 
the people. It is certain he cannot please all the people. 



The Soviet Government has 
Many Friends Under Cover had a great number of well- 
wishers in the the United 
States. Our American parlor socialists were eager for 
its success in Russia. Many of the illiterate and half- 
barbarous immigrants from Kussia-in-Europc were 
fervid Bolshevists who fondly anticipated a great revolu- 
tion and grand divide of the property of those who had 
saved anything. Hardly a line house in San Francisco that 

some hungry-eyed Bolshevist had not looked at covetously. 

and marked for bis own when the bugle-call sounded and 
communists rushed from all the shuns and cellars to join 
tin- intellectual revolutionists in the orgy of throat cutting 
and rapine. (In Montgomery street near Market in the 
centre of the financial district was a debating club of "intel- 
lectual" communists, who louder than the whiskered Bol- 
shevists in the second hand stores on Howard Street. 
predicted the triumphant inarch of Lcnine's followers 
around the world. 

The failure of the Russian commune has been a sad blow- 
to the hopes of local Bolshevists and an inestimable blessing 
to honest and law-abiding citizens, who little realized the 
proximity and fierceness of the volcano on which they 
stood. while Woodrow Wilson's experimental idealism 

imperilled his country. 

1'. 11. McCarthy announces that the 
Should Be In Jail "radicals" are unhorsing him and he 

cannot be responsible for what may 
happen, Why should gentlemen like Mr. McCarthy be 
"responsible." Have we not governments. Federal. State, 
and Municipal, to protect life and property — and personal 
liberty? If the governments allow labor politicians in 
operating the "closed shop" to usurp public functions no 
doubt those usurpers will be strutting around posing as 
patriots and benefactors, when they should be jailed for 
interfering with honest people's liberties. Building has 
Stopped. Property on Ninth Sstrect near Market was 
for $125 a foot last week. Formerly it brought $800 a 

things up to Mr. McCarthy and his labor 
trust. The Open Shop will sweep them out of political 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Communist Zucker Repents 

First Glimpse of Russia Cures Him 

By HARVY BROUGHAM 



WHEN Morris Zucker was sentenced in 1918,to fifteen 
years in prison, for delivering an address, in favor 
of Bolshevism, he was described by the newspapers 
as fifth in the leading group of Communist organizers in the 
United States. He was ardent and dangerous, for he 
believed it would be a blessing to mankind if the United 
States were transformed at once into a Soviet Government. 

Now, after five months in Russia, four of which he spent 
in jail his hatred of Lenine's rule is as bitter as was his 
antagonism to capital in America in 1918. Observation of 
Soviet Government in action has made Morris Zucker a 
changed and repentant Communist.. 

Who is he — this Morris Zucker who is now trying to open 
the eyes of his former misguided fellow-communists in 
Amercia to the madness of Soviet rule? 

Zucker came to the United States as an immigrant, 
twenty-one years ago. When sentenced to fifteen years 
imprisonment for his intemperate oratory he was a dentist 
with a dwindling practice in Brownsville. President Wil- 
son pardoned him. 

Hell Instead of Heaven 

"By resorting to various subterfuges the pardoned Com- 
munist managed to reach Russia. On his way he was 
arrested by the British authorities at Southampton and 
ordered to be returned to the United States, but he escaped 
and under a false name reached Reval, where his disillusion 
as a Commuinist began. Instead of a heaven of equality, 
liberty and fraternity he found a hell. 

Like eager vultures about the body af a dead animal, 
radicals whom he had known in America and thousands 
of Bolshevists from Russia had ensconced themselves in 
governmental posts representing the Soviet Government. 

Later Zucker learned that this is the manner in which the 
present regime is desperately trying to keep its head above 
water. In many cities there are far more men in govern- 
mental positions than there are workers in industry. Being 
products of the Communist system and dependent upon it 
for a livelihood, they struggle eagerly to keep it in power. 
Communistic Ideas of Equality 

At Riga, where he obtained the final vise to his passport 
which enabled him to enter Russia, Zucker obtained his 
first glimpse into the autocratic methods of government 
of the Soviet officials. With 160 other zealous Bolshevists 
from America he was forced to entrain for Moscow in third 
class compartments, sleeping on hard boards. On a track 
nearby stood a luxuriant Pullman car with the title : "For 
the Diplomatic Mission, R. F. S. R.," the Initials of the 
Russian Socialist Federation Soviet Republic. 

Here was his first glimpse into the fact that in Soviet 
Russia all men were not on the same footing; that while 
the poor workers suffered, those who had 1 risen to power 
in their name rode luxuriously. Yet he did not heed this 
omen, for his faith was too great to be shaken so easily. 
Communists in the Bread-line 

Zucker's disillusions when he found that the Soviet Gov- 
ernment was maintained by tyranny and espionage reached 
a climax at Moscow where a meal-card was the symbol 
of freedom and equality. Embittered in heart by finding 
that he had to stand in line like a beggar if he desired to 
eat, Zucker found other causes of anger. Freedom of 
speech, press and assemblage was forbidden not only to the 



burgeoisie but had also to the working class. None could 
speak his views except they were in harmony with the 
policy of the Communist Party, of which Lenine and Trot- 
zky were the head. Not a newspaper could appear except 
that it voiced the will of these leaders. Worse than all was 
the discovery of the power of the Vetcheka, the spy organ- 
ization used by those in power to hold the Russian people 
as long as possible in submission. 

"I discovered," he writes, "that the masses are cowed by 
a secret, terrible, omnipresent spy organization, which ar- 
rests whom it will and where it will and does with its 
victims what it will ; that the noblest souls and purest 
hearts to be found in the whole of Russia are now rotting 
in its prisons — O, what living hells ! 

"I saw the mask of proletarian simplicity removed and 
the most fiendish abuse of power over a helpless people 
exposed. I saw a band of men, slaves in their hearts and 
slaves in their minds, wield their power as only slaves will 
when they suddenly assume the master's place. 
Elections Regulated by Bayonets 

Zucker learned that at every election only the candidates 
of the Communist Party were permitted to be voted 
upon. These were selected by caucus by* members 
of the party in each Soviet. Not another name could 
come up for balloting, and if any objection was raised 
against the Communist candidates those daring enough to 
oppose them were thrown into jail. 

Thrown Into Prison 

Zucker was arrested in Moscow by order of Santeri 
Nuortcva, whom he had known personally in New York. 
Nuorteva told him that the Italian Socialist delegation, the 
German Trade Union Mission and the German Independ- 
ent Socialist Party had all made investigations in Soviet and 
given unfavorable reports to their organizations. The 
Soviet Government could not afford to have such news 
going out of the country, and unless Zucker could assure 
him his report would be favorable, he would have to go to 
prison. Zucker wrote out the results of his observations 
to date of the Lenine-Trotzky regime and was at once 
thrown into prison. He found himself imprisoned with 
representatives of every political faith, officers of the old 
Czaristic armies, who aided the Bolsheviks in their battles 
against the Poles; reactionaries, Mensheviks, Social Revo- 
lutionaries and others. All had in some way incurred the 
displeasure of the Communist Party and its all-powerful 
leaders, Lenine, Trotzky and ZinoviefF. 

Here he learned much more about the operation of the 
Soviet Government. Instead of finding that the poor were 
fed and the rich forced to share alike with them, he dis- 
covered that even in the prisons of the proletariat the rich 
were cared for and the poor suffered. For the food was 
insufficient to subsist upon and only by food sent in by 
friends from the outside with money or by theft from 
fellow prisoners could they subsist. This gave only the 
rich and the thieves the chance to survive. 

Lice, no blankets, cold, insufficient food and the tortures 
and executions of prisoners on all sides of him were 
undermining the health of the rugged Communist 
from the United States. Finally, as a result of intense 
suffering in prison — being fed hot water for breakfast, lunch 
and dinner and a half pound of bread daily — Zucker col- 
lapsed and was removed to a hospital. There Louise Bry- 
ant, wife of the late radical John Reed, learned of his 
plight and obtained his release. He was sent out of Russia 
without a cent and with no papers to enable him to return 
to this country. 

Through the aid of a Y. M. C. A. man the disillusioned 
Communist reached Berlin and there obtained money to 
return to the United States to proclaim his repentance. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR AUGUST 20, 1921 

Science Issue Clarified 

By PETER V. ROSS 



Harvey Brougham, in his article in these columns July 
30th. gets things considerably mixed in regard to Mark 
Twain, Augusta E. Stetson, and Christian Science. Mrs. 
Stetson is not, as he seems to suppose a member of the 
Christian Science Church, nor is she in any way its rep- 
resentative. Therefore when she speaks, whether through 
the newspapers or otherwise, she does not speak for 
Christian Scientists and their organization. Most certainly 
they are not encouraging her utterances nor paying for her 
full-page advertisements. These facts are so generally 
known that it is a wonder they have escaped so discerning a 
critic as Mr. Brougham. 

His assumption that Mrs. Stetson is Mrs. Eddy's succes- 
sor is quite as unwarranted as his supposition that she is a 
member of the church established by Mrs. Eddy. Discover- 
ers cannot have successors. Has Newton, Watt, or Fulton 
a successor? No more has Mrs. Eddy, the discoverer and 
founder of Christian Science. 

The failure of Christian Scientists to commemorate the 
centenary of Mrs. Eddy need not occasion Mr. Brougham 
any surprise. Christian Scientists refrain from celebra- 
ting birthdays for much the same reason that other per- 
sons refrain from such celebration. People generally are 
finding it conducive to long life and sustained vigor to for- 
get recurring anniversaries of their birth rather than to 
solemnly commemorate them and look expectantly for 
the infirmities that are supposed to accompany advancing 
years. Clearly we shall put on immortality, not by stres- 
sing mortality, but by living as nearly as possible in con- 
formity with the sense of existence as without beginning of 
years nor end of life." 

It is true that Mark Twain indulged in the adverse crit- 
icisms of Mrs. Eddy to which Mr. Brougham refers, but 
he also had some very complimentary things to say of her. 
For instance he declared, according to his biographer 
Albert Bigelow Paine: "Closely examined, painstakingly 
studied, she is easily the most interesting person on the 
planet, and in several ways as easily the must extraordinary 
woman that was ever born upon it." 



Soldiers and employees of the Soviet Government he saw- 
everywhere. Churches, convents, monasteries, office 
buildings, palaces and soldiers' concentration camps had all 
been turned into prisons. Soviet Russia as now constituted 
preserves its hold only by the huge bureaucratic system 
it has developed, having so many persons dependent on the 
Government for support — although no real work is done — 
that the majority cannot afford to have the Government 
fall. Soldiers and prisons are ever ready to keep down the 
slightest sign of rebellion or discontent. By bayonets the 
present regime remains in power and knows as it does 90 
that once deposed it will never return. 



When the government permits Labor Trust thugs to 

kill honest American Plan workers, who dare to take jobs 
without asking permission of some "Business Agent." why 
lid it surprise people that crimes like llightower's are 
committed? Murder is ceasing to be abhorrent. 



Sex appeal is now disregarded says that famous apostle 
of sweetness and purity, Mr. Ziegfeld, and the "stage is 
growing cleaner." Is the apostle of unveiled beauty a com- 
petent jud| 




FOR the Man who would have his 
dress an expression of self, in its 
correctness and evident quality — 
commend him to our Made-to-Measure 
Dress Shirts, Robes, Tuxedo Shirts, Paja- 
mas, Sport Shirts, Underwear, Neckwear. 




WHY SEND YOUR ORDERS TO NEW YORK WHEN YOU 
CAN GET EQUAL SERVICE AT HOME? 

D. C. HEGER 

1161 18 Kearny Street 




The treasured 
secret of coffee- 
roasting" produce* 
the wondrous flavor 

©wells 

^ ■^KA IIQNAI CREST 

©fee 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 







Dr. Abrams' Miraculous Machine 

The scientific quarrel between our famous scientist Dr. 
Abrams and Dr. C. F. Buckley is rapidly advancing to the 
importance of a world affair. As a prophet is not without 
honor save in his own country, it is necessary to place 
before the reader a few introductory facts about the battle 
of the medicos. * * * 

Dr. Abrams is not a prophet in the ordinary meaning of 
the word. He is a physician and surgeon of inventive ten- 
dencies which have produced an electrical machine of sur- 
passing talent. It does more than talk. It sniffs a sample 
of human blood, smeared on a slip of paper, and immediate- 
ly tells the nationality, age. sex. and all that is worth learn- 
ing of the person bled. * * # 

Doctor Buckley is so well known, professionally and so- 
cially, it seems a waste of space to tell anything about him 
in San Francisco, where he has been doctoring millionaires 
and social notables for a generation. He has felt the pulses 
of capitalists so long and so often, that he should be able 
to tell the size of patient's bank roll by the beat of his heart. 
Dr. Buckle}- is not from Missouri, but he has all the curios- 
ity of natives of that State and insists on being shown. 
Especially is that the case when a new-fangled theory of 
medical science is being exploited. Dr. Buckley sniffs in- 
credulously when Dr. Abrams wonderful machine is under 
discussion. He admits he is unable to master the "mystic- 
al contraption," and falls back upon the decision of French 
Savants — or were they Italian — who prouounced it a "con- 
crete example of assininity." 

* * * 

But all the medicos of Europe are not of that mind about 
I )r. Abrams' epochal invention. Doctors from many parts 
of the globe are calling to see the machine and famous 
British scientists are publishing papers about it in medical 
journals. Most distinctly. Doctor Abrams has caused a 
sensation of far-reaching force and in a measure placed 
San Francisco on the medical map. 

* * * 

Dr. Abrams deems it necessary to put forth a flock of 
pamphlets explanatory of the critical situation, giving the 
favorable opinions of foreign and native physicians, who 
saw his invention in action, and also dealing with the du- 
plicity of Doctor Buckley, who tried to tangle him up by 
sending for mechanical diagnosis samples of blood not 
human at all, but mayhap the life current of a flounder or 
billygoat. The superhuman machine no sooner sniffed the 
bait than it spat it out. proving conclusively, that Dr. Buck- 
ley was "playing roots" on the inventor and trying to make 
him ridiculous. But poetic justice has overcome the face- 
tious medico, to-wit. Sir James Barr. M. D., L.L.D., F.R.C. 
P., F.R.S.F., late president of the British Medical .\>-o,i- 
ation, takes Dr .Abrams' wonderful invention very serious- 
ly. His dissertation on the machine covers pages of the 
London Medical World. % * * 

To explain all the fine details of Dr. Abrams miraculous 
machine would be far beyond the power of anv layman. The 
Doctor's basic theory is that all matter is subject to elec- 
tric vibrations. By studying these vibrations all human 
ills can be diagnosed. His machine indicates to the prac- 



ticed ear, where a disease is located. He twists the handle, 
we presume, and the "percussions" tells as plainly as a 
steam guage would indicate to an engineer the workings 
of a donkey engine. Dull mufifled percussions in the cra- 
nium for instance mean tumor in the brain. Another sort 
of percussion in the region of the abdomen denotes cancer 
of the stomach. So on all down the line. The diagnosti- 
cian can detect the electronic effects of an in-growing nail 
or a troublesome soft corn. Nothing is too serious or too 
trivial to be overlooked by Dr. Abrams' machine. This, of 
course, is not a scientific analysis of the subject, but it may 
help the reader's imagination. 

* * * 

Sir James Barr, with the alphabet attached to his name, 
does not himself pretend that he is master of all the mys- 
teries of Dr. Abrams' machine but makes the point that 
its "use requires an acute sense of hearing and delicate 
sense of touch. To doctors who only hear with their ears 
and not with their understanding, it will not be of any use, 
but to any physician who is rather deaf in one ear. and 
does not hear very well with the other, the instrument 
should prove invaluable." If Sir James did not have so 
many letters after his name, we might suspect that he was 
what Londoners call "spoofing" our distinguished medical 
inventor, but that levity would be impossible in the late 
president of the Britisli medical Association. Dr. Buckley 
might try to palm off a flounder or billygoats blood on Dr. 
Abrams to try, and throw a monkey wrench, metaphoric- 
ally speaking, in the wonderful electrical machine, but such 
tricks can not be expected from Sir James. At least we 
hope not. * * * 

Sir James made several tests of Dr. Abrams' blood t< :st 
theories, but not with the most satisfactory results. Per- 
haps he did not comply with all the scientific precautions 
insited on by Dr. Abrams. In extracting blood from a 
patient, to be submited to the miraculous machine the pa- 
tient should be facing the west, standing on two separately 
grounded aluminum plates with feet and hands well apart 
to avoid short-circuiting. There should be no red or yellow 
colors in the operating room, and the blood should be taken 
in subdued light. Sir James may have extracted the blood 
when the patient was facing the north-west, or west -by- 
west, north-west. There may have been yellow or red 
spots in the linoleum or somebody around with red whis- 
kers or yellow reputation. Something happened. 

* * * 

Dr. Abrams is improving his miraculous electrical ma- 
chine by making it emit musical notes. Sir James states. 
That will lie a great advantage. When a Sinn Fciner's 
blood is shoved into the slot and the Doctor turns the crank 
no doubt the machine will play "The Wearing of the Green." 
An Orangeman's blood will produce "The Battle of the 
Boyne." There will be strains of the "Marsellaise." when 
a Frechman is under diagnosis, anil the Hula-Hula for 
a Hawaiian. What an age of scientific wonders. 



An Accomplished Governor. 

Ronald Storrs of Jerusalem was highest honor man in 
his day in Cambridge University, England. He speaks not 
only all of the European languages in wide use. but also 
Arabic and Turkish, and knows Greek and Latin. He was 
found in the Governorate in Jerusalem one morning com- 
posing a greeting in Hebrew to the Jewish community on 
one of their festival days. His accomplishments as a musi- 
cian and his appreciation of other arts give him other 
avenues of appeal to his variegated constituency of 22 sects. 
He is one of the few Englishmen to have honorary mem- 
bership in the American Phi Beta Kappa Society. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR AUGUST 20, 1921 



German Peril of Low Wages 

By H. S. MORRIS 

FROM Sir Philip Gibbs, who is regarded in Enerland 
as one of the foremost authorities on industrial mat- 
ters comes a statement of the actual condition of 
Germany. It has been published in the Review of Reviews 
and is of the greatest interest in America at this moment, 
when the questions of wage readjustment and unemploy- 
ment are so vital. 

Low German Wages 

The German working man in the Krupp factories is paid 
GO marks a day, says Sir Philip Gibbs. At the old rate of 
exchange that would be 15, but at the present value it 
would be $1.25. For an eigh-hour day it works out at 15 
cents an hour, as compared with 60 cents an hour for the 
mechanics in Great Britain. How is the British workman 
and the Ameican to compete with a German mechanic, paid 
such wages and highly efficient. Of the German efficiency 
there has never been any question. How does the German 
workingman exist on his low wages ? Sir Philip Gibbs 
describes the conditions : 

Hardly Enough To Eat 

"The German workingman on 60 marks a day gets almost 
enough to eat (never enough meat), almost enough to 
support a wife and small family, almost enough to 
make himself satisfied with his job. By strict attention to 
economy he can squeeze out a few marks for the simple 
pleasures of his leisure hours, which consist mostly in light 
beer and light music in some public garden or beer hall. 

Poor Clerks Worse Off 

"The professional classes, and the clerical classes (city 
clerks, typists, etc.) are not so well off relatively as the 
mechanics and labourers. Whereas the cost uf living has 
increased from 8 to 10 times, the salaries uf professors, 
teachers, Civil servants, and others have only risen from 4 
In (i limes. It is they who arc must pinched, and reduced 
to desperate straits in order 'to keep up appearances.' 

German Captains of Industry 

Sir Philip Gibbs tells how the German captains of indus- 
try are utilizing the great mass of cheap labor at their 

command : 

"German capitalists are building up a new and intensive 

system of industrial organization, beyond anything the 

win lil has previousl} seen in efficiency and driving power. 
Hugo Stennis and his great Trust, controlling a vast 
monopoly of coal, iron and steel, of whom there has been so 
much talk, because he represents most powerfully this new 
phase of German energy, is only one of a score of other 
magnates who practically control the whole industrial life 
of Germany, ami are the real rulers of the State. 

" ["heir method is what is described as the creation of 

'vertical' Trusts. That is to say. by a combination and 

ing of many companies in possession of raw material 

and industrial plants they build up an immense production 

ol manufactured articles which have that raw material as 



their basis. 



Krupp's Peaceful Output 



"Thus the great munition works of Krupp. entirely en- 
gaged in the production of guns and armaments during the 
in a colossal scale, read the lesson of defeat, anil within 
a few months after the Armistice, adapted their plant and 
their organizing genius in a marvelous way to the require- 
ments •.>[ peace. They are now making engines and ma- 



chinery of all kinds, agricultural implements, cash registers, 

safety razors, and any kind of article in iron and steel for 
which there is a world market. The General Electric is 
also developing its energy with gigantic strides, reaching 
out to 'neutral' countries and absorbing many industrial 
concerns of which the basis of activity is coal and iron and 
electric power, in Austria, Hungary and other countries. 

Capturing World Markets 

"These great Trusts are already capturing the world's 
markets, and have already succeeded in recovering some of 
the pre-war prosperity of German trade — which is almost 
a miracle considering the ruin of the German economic 
system by the exhaustion of a bloody and unsuccessful war, 
the loss of colonies, shipping and foreign property, the loss 
of man power, and the deterioration of machinery, railways 
and rolling stock. 

Imports Falling Off 

"Amazing as this is, however, one must not exaggerate 
the actual results. Germany is not rolling in wealth, as 
some observers have reported. Apart altogether from her 
international debts — leaving on one side altogether the 
gigantic payments of the indemnities which she has under- 
taken — her industry and commerce are about two-thirds 
normal compared with the pre-war standard. Her imports 
of cotton amount to nearly half of those of 1913. Her coal 
output during the first four months of this year was 44/2 
million tons compared with 57 million tons in the same 
period of 1913. 

"Half the amount of pre-war tonnage (largely under 
foreign flags) is now coming into the port of Hamburg, 

What Will Happen to Other Countries? 

"All this is a sign of industrial and commercial recovery. 
astounding as a proof of energy, industry, and organized 
efficiency, after the shock of national defeat, tint those 
German people who have put up such a tremendous fighl 
for their old place in the world are now confronted with the 
necessity of paying indemnities to the victor nations which 
will test their power or recovery to the utmost and demand 

new and unprecedented efforts. It is not going to bi 

fiii- them to pay. If they succeed, it will be the greatest 
industrial adventure ever undertaken by any people in 
the world. To succeed they must increase their volume of 
exports by at hast four times, which would be an achieve- 
ment unrivalled in the industrial history of the world 
they do that, and if they do what will be the effect upon 
other nations? Drys Disappointed 

The August Grand Jury in Brooklyn, X. V.. has been a 

disappointment to the Drys. The jury refused to return 
any indictments against persons in cases of search by police 
without a warrant. All cases where the defendants were 
charged with having beer were dismissed. Hip pocket cases 

were also dismissed. 

The EYE and the BRAIN 




Poor Memory, H 

Weak, Inflamed, 

• s arid 



y. i 

■ ^n<I r 
ments are 

r»nd compl 









eadactu 

Smarting. Sensitive 

■ 
STRAIN. 

H.MKNTS 

children's 
'a of eye 



GEORGE MAYERLE 



L'SIVI 



r.W.IST 



?7 "S ■ 

960 MARKET STREET 

Between Mason and Taylor 

SAN FRANCISCO 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



^1^4ftomoiih 




The Roadside Brigand 

ONE of the ills of life for the 
motorists is that whenever any- 
thing happens which demands 
the assistance of a mechanic it is some- 
where out of town and nobody to be 
found able to do the repairs but some 
bucolic profiteer who charges almost 
as much as the car is worth. At least 
that is how it seems to the unlucky 
motorist though of course there are 
exceptions to the rule. California is 
not the only place where such things 
happen. In the New York Herald a 
writer narrating his adventures as in 
Sunday motoring describes how he 
fared at the hands of a wayside me- 
chanic when his car suddenly veered 
to the side and stopped. 

"Thank goodness we are in front of 
a garage," remarked my wife. 

Sure enough, we were. Before it, 
with his chair tilted back against the 
wall, was a complacent youth in flan- 
nel shirt and brown overalls who re- 
garded me with a cynical smile as I 
alighted and raised the hood. His 
grin and a desire to redeem myself 
for the episode of the empty gasoline 
tank steeled my resolve to make that 
dratted car run or die in the attempt. 
I would never call upon that patron- 
izingly amused mechanic ! 

"It's the ignition this time without 
a doubt," I announced, after shorting 
a spark plug again, not with the 
treacherous screwdriver this time, 
but with the terminal wire itself. 

I glanced hastily at such wires as 
were visible. All were unquestiona- 
bly in place. What the deuce was I to 
do now? Heretofore there had al- 
ways been some visible easily discov- 
ered reason for a sudden uninten- 
tional halt. This time there was 
none. All my mechanical knowledge 
had been acquired by experience, but 
here I had no precedent to guide me. 
My faithful instruction book had 
warned that distributer points fre- 
quently needed cleaning. I opened 
the distributer. Thank goodness, I 
knew where it was ! I took out of it 
several little thingumajigs and pol- 
ished them thoroughly. I put them 
back. The car wouldn't start. The 
garage mechanic w-as silently but 
highly amused. I hoped he might 
laugh himself to death ! 

After half an hour of this my wife 
could stand it no longer. 

"Come here and make this thing 
go," she called to the languid me- 



chanic. 

He leisurely uncoiled his legs from 
those of his chair and sauntered to- 
ward us. 

"Yes, see what it is," I adjured. "I 
know there is something radically 
wrong." 

The mechanic reached under my 
dash-board and felt about with one 
hand. Then he poked the other un- 
der, holding a pair of small pliers 
from one of his pockets. At the 
end of just two minutes he straight- 
ened up. 

"She'll run now ; one of your wires 
was disconnected from the switch," 
he said. 

"Ha, ha !" I chortled, trying to 
laugh it off. "Funny thing I didn't 
discover it." 

"What," I continued in the same 
spirit of levity, "do I owe you?" 

I said it in a tone that implied, I 
hoped, that I was a good sport, wil- 
ling to pay any fair price for being 
helped out, but not supposing that 
two minutes work would cost any- 
thing. 

All hint of amusement was gone 
from the mechanic's face as he look- 
ed at me sternly and replied : 

"Five dollars." he said curtly. 

I thought, of course, he was jok- 
ing, and I was quite willing to reply 
in kind. 

"II a! ha! ha! Charge it up to 
me," I laughed, and climbed back to 
my seat. 

"Say, where do you get that 
'charge it' stuff?" he demanded. "I 
said 'live dollars' and I mean five dol- 
lars." 

"What!" I exclaimed. "Do you in- 
tend to convey the impression that 
you want five dollars for doing two 
minutes work?" 

"Oh, no, not for doing two minu- 
tes work," he said. "For knowing 
how." 

I gurgled incoherently. 

"Isn't it worth something to you 
nut to stand here all day?" he said. 
"It cost me money and time to learn 
how to find troubles and fix 'em. 
It's men like you that don't know- 
beans about their cars that got's to 
pay for my education. I took a night 
course in a school of automotive en- 
gineering. I could tear down your 
car from top to bottom and put it 
back together again in a day." 

He looked quite willing to perform 
the first part of his theat, if such it 



was, there and then, and I yielded. 
Making as much of a joke of the af- 
fair as I could, paid him and drove 

away. 

Care of Clutch 

The clutch should be inspected and 
cleaned out every 5.000 miles and on 
machines operating continually the in- 
terval should be much shorter. To 
clean out a disk clutch put a plug in the 
hole at the bottom of the clutch case, 
take cover off top of clutch and then 
putting a mixture of two quarts of ker- 
osene and one quart of oil ; put the lid 
back and run the motor briskly for a 
few minutes, working the clutch back 
and forth while the motor is running. 

This cleans out the clutch sides, 
plates and bearings. When the clutch 
has had a chance to be thoroughly 
cleaned, turn off the motor and let the 
oil and kerosene drain off by remov- 
ing the plug at the bottom of the case. 

Fill grease cups and keep these cups 
in order by throwing out the yoke and 
screwing them down every week. This 
will insure a smooth perfect running 
clutch. Cone clutches are cleaned by 
using an oil can full of kerosene thor- 
oughly to wet the leather face, letting 
the motor run and working the clutch 
back and forth. Then put neat's foot 
oil on the leather surface, 



Be Careful 

Don't neglect your steering mechan- 
ism. A car whose direction cannot be 
controlled is dangerous. While adjust- 
ing mechanisms it is best to turn 
wheels to extreme right. Parts arc 
worn less at this position than when 
straight ahead. Never turn the steer- 
ing wheel while the car is standing 
Still. This puts severe strain on all 
steering gear parts and is hard on 
tires. Careful drivers will inspect fre- 
quently. 

Watch Manifold. 

Don't neglect your manifold. If you 
have a spark plug which is not screw- 
ed tight, or a petcock partly open, or a 
gasket which is not absolutely air 
tight, your engine will miss badly when 
you try to make it pull at slow speed 
on a hill. To find air leaks, squirt a 
little oil around the plug, or gasket, 
and if bubbles show up you have found 
a leak. 

Income Tax 

The cost of gasoline, ordinary re- 
pairs and upkeep of an automobile, 
used wholly for business purposes, may 
be deducted by the business man in the 
United States in filling out his income 
tax return. The cost of substantial in- 
permanent improvement to the car. 
such as a new top or body, is not re- 
garded as repairs and is not deductible. 
The owner is entitled to deduct a reas- 
onable aim unit for the annual depreci- 
ation in the value of the car. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR AUGUST 20, 1921 



11 



Cotati Captivates Motorists 

Thirty Thousand Witness Lowering of the Speedway Record 
Cotati Race Summary 



Position 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 



Driver 
Eddie Hearne _. 
Roscoe Sarles __ 
Tommy Milton 
Eddie Miller ___ 

Alton Soules 

Joe Thomas 



Car 
Disteel-Dusenberg 

Dusenberg 

Duran Special 

Dusenberg 

Frontenac 

Dusenberg 



Time. 
lhr.21m.19 1/5s. 
lhr. 22m.— 1/Ss. 
lhr. 24m.47 2/5s. 
lhr. 29m.S8 1/Ss. 
lhr. 30m. 1 l/5s. 
lhr. 42m. 18 1/Ss. 



Needless — "Can your little brother 
talk yet?" a kindly neighbor inquired 

of a small lad. "No, he can't talk, and 
there ain't no reason why he should 
talk," was the disgusted reply. "What 
does he want to talk for, when all he 
has to do is yell a while to get every- 
thing in the house that's worth hav- 
ing?" — New York Evening Post. 



The 30,000 spectators who went to 
the North Bay Speedway at Cotati 
last Sunday, to see the contest of nine 
famous drivers for the 150-mile cham- 
pionship race expected an exciting ex- 
perience and they were not disap- 
pointed. 

No accident occured, in the well-con- 
tested race, but for 49 laps, Tom Soules 
who made a gallant struggle for first 
place, was speeding along at a pace 
over 100 miles an hour, with defective 
tire. Observing motorists wondered 
what might happen, if the tire burst 
and the careening machine flew off 
the speedway into space. 

Fortunately the dreaded accident did 
not reach the stage of fatality. The 
plucky driver at last relinquished his 
hopes n! taking first place and drew 
down to the lower level of the track to 
change the defective tire, thus losing 
his chance. 

The start of the race found Eddie 
Hearne driving a Distecl Dusenberg 
in the favored position and he never 
relinquished his advantage, finishing 
the 150 miles in 1 hour 21 minutes and 
19 1-5 seconds, an average of better 
than 110 miles per hour. This is the 
new world's record for a circular track, 

Roscoe Sarles in a Duescnberg cap- 
tured second honors, finishing a lap 
behind Hearne. Tommy Milton in a 
Durant special was third, and Eddie 
Miller (Duescnberg) , Tom Soules 

(Frontenac), and Joe Thomas (Dues- 
cnberg) finished in the order named. 

The fight for position between 
Hearne, Thomas and Sarles furnished 
the thrills of the first few laps. From 
the eighth to the sixteenth laps the 
four leaders were only a few feet apart 
where the touch of a wheel meant' 
death. 

Hearne clipped off the first fifteen 
miles in S minutes S 2-5 seconds : Si 
went into second position on the fit- 
tenth lap and Hearne pocketed him on 
the turns. At times the two cars. 
whirled around the track at one hun- 
dred and twelve miles an hour, only 
a few inches apart. 

Hearne stepped away from Soules in 
the forty-eighth lap and in the fifty- 
eighth the latter went to the pits for a 
tire change. Sarles pulled into s< 
place about a half lap behind Hearne. 

The first hundred miles was run in 



the world record time of fifty four 
minutes and four fifths of a second. 

Hearne captured the $5,000 purse, 
Sarles received $3,000 and Milton $2,- 
000, the others receiving purses in pro- 
portion. 

The size of the crowd and the inter- 
est exhibited demonstrated that motor- 
ing has lost none of its fascination for 
the public. Most of the spectators 
arriving at the speedway in their cars 
and the journey to the scene was a 
procession with machines three abreast. 
Seldom has such a gathering of motor 
cars been witnessed in Northern Cali- 
fornia. It can be said without any 
qualification that Cotati has suddenly 
become a place of distinction in the 
geography of motorists, and promises 
to remain so, as long as sport of the 
grade offered the public last Sunday 
is furnished. 



"PHAT was the last card I dealt ye, 
Mike?" "A sphade." "Oi knew it 
was. Oi saw ye spit on yer hands be- 
fore ye picked it up." — American Le- 
gion Weekly. 



FOR SALE 
40 H. P. Roadster 

( Late Model) 

Perfect Mechanical Condition 
Throughout 

Special Top, New Tires and Extra 
Equipment 

BARGA1N^$700 

Box 20---S. F. NEWS LETTER 

382 Rum Building, 5 an Francisco 




Cleaner Complete 

A Perfect Cleaner for Automobiles 

Efficient — Economical 



VAN AUTO VACUUM CLEANER 

AND GAS SAVER 

Please Note the Following Features; 
1 — !<■ ■ |'S : "'>'■ 

Baves twenty-five per cent In consumption of gas. 
:•. Cleans tiic engine by running Kerosene through 

the Vacuum Into tin- motor. 

i Cleans dirt and •Inst out of the outside rasing 
naglng tires, 
takes adjustment of air isy at any 

altll 

FOR SALE BY ALL DEALERS 

Price Complete $15.00. Installed $1 7.50 

Manufactured By 

VAN AUTO VACUUM COMPANY 

135 Hyde Street, San Francisco, Calif. 
Phone Prospect 132 



^au JFraurisrn (Ehrmurlr 

Leading Newspaper of the Pacific Coast 



Every 



Newspaper made every day 

. TO SPEAK TO 

member of every family 



Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for $1.15 a month- 
including Sunday editions 
Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postmaster 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 




ociot 




MR. AND MRS. J. C. STUBBS. 
formerly of San Francisco, 
celebrated the fiftieth anniver- 
sary of their marriage Sunday in Los 
Angeles, where they have been living 
for the past year. It was an interest- 
ing occasio.i and a family reunion. Dr. 
and Mrs. Morton Gibbons, the latter of 
whom was Miss Mary Stubbs, went 
from here for the event, taking their 
three children, Morton Gibbons, Jr., 
who is a student at Stanford, and Miss 
Beulah and Miss Margaret Gibbons. 

The wedding of Mr. and Mrs. Stubbs 
took place on August 14, 1871, in Sac- 
ramento soon after the arrival of Mr. 
Stubbs in California from Ashland, 
Ohio, which was his boyhood home. 
Mrs. Stubbs was Miss Mary Paterson. 
Mr. Stubbs started life in Sacramento 
as a railroad freight clerk and later 
became vice president and traffic man- 
ager of the Southern Pacific. He was 
one of the biggest railroad men of the 
country and retired a few years ago 
after many years service. 

Engagements 

The engagement of MissGenevieve 

Spader, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. T. 
Spader, and J. Stuart Morshead, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley W. Morshead, 
is announced. No date for the wed- 
ding is set as yet. The engagement 
is a romantic sequel to a friendship be- 
gun when the young couple attended 
high school, continued through their 
years at the University of California, 
from which both graduated, and has 
been a predominating attachment since 
then, very much to the pleasure of the 
two families concerned. 

Mrs. B. S. Schlesinger gave a tea 

Friday at her home.VallejoSt.,for Miss 



Wiltard', 

Y T139-153 GEARY S 



Si 



ST. 

maptjlppa-pel 
/op LUomen 
and Tf}jsses 

SKrle ars-d Quality 
IVilkout Extravagance? 




Florence Holberton, whose engage- 
ment was recently announced to Mr. 
Franklin Slade. Miss Holberton is a 
very pretty and attractive girl and has 
been constantly entertained since the 
announcement of her engagement a 
few weeks ago at a tea given by Miss 
Dorothy Jordan at the home of her 
Mother, Mrs. E. V. Smith, and Colonel 
Smith, at the Presidio. 

Dances 

A bal masque, will be given on Fri- 
day, August 26, at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. William Kent at Kentfield. 
Approximately three hundred cards 
have been sent out for the affair. To as- 
sist them there will be Mr. and Mrs. 
William Kent, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas Kent, Mr. and Mrs. Stanleigh 
Arnold and Miss Adeline Kent. 

Mr. and Mrs. Seward B. McNear 

will have a large summer dance at 
their home in Ross next Saturday 
evening. Many of the same guests 
that the Kents will have will also be 
at the McNear dance. This is in hon- 
or of Miss Anne Dibblee and Freder- 
ick Hope Beaver, who will be mar- 
ried October 1. Miss Dibblee and Miss 
Amanda McNear, who will assist in 
receiving the guests at the dance, made 
their debuts at the same time and have 
continued an intimate friendship. In- 
cidentally Mrs. Harrison Dibblee will 
be hostess at a tea this week in honor 
of her niece, Miss Anne Dibblee. 

One of the larger parties at the 

Burlingame Country Club on Satur- 
day evening was a dinner dance at 
which Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Murphy 
entertained for their subdebutantes 
daughter, Miss Gertrude Murphy. 

Luncheons 

Mrs. Charles M. Josselyn gave a 

luncheon Tuesday for Mrs. George Ali 
of New York. It took place at the 
Josselyn home at Woodsidc and sev- 
eral of the guests motored down from 
town for the event. 

Mr. and Mrs. George T. Marye 

have as their guests at tljeir home in 
Burlingame, Mr. and Mrs. William H. 
McKittrick of Bakersfield. The Mar- 
yes gave a luncheon Monday for the 
visitors. 

Miss Geraldine Grace of Santa Ro- 
sa gave a luncheon Thursday at the 
Town and Country Club for Miss 
Marie Louise Potter, one of the most 
attractive of the group of girls who 
will be debutantes in another year or 
two. 

Mrs. Frederick Sharon was the 



guest for whom Mrs. Henry E. Bothin 
gave a luncheon at her home in Ross 
Valley. 

Mrs. Frank Pivley. who left sev- 
eral weeks ago for Coronado, is plan- 
ning to spend the winter at the Hotel 
Coronado. She gave a luncheon there 
recently as a farewell to Mrs. Clans 
Spreckels before she went to Denver. 

Miss Constance Hart, who will be 

one of the bridesmaids at the wedding 
of Miss Lorna Williamson and Mr. An- 
drew Talbot, which will take place on 
October 8, gave a luncheon Tuesday 
at her home in California street for the 
bride-elect. Mrs. Benno Hart assisted 
her daughter in receiving. 

In honor of Mrs. George Ali. who 

since her arrival in California has been 
entertained by her many friends. Mrs. 
Charles Josselyn had an informal lun- 
cheon and bridge party at her country 
home in Woodside Monday afternoon. 

The Countess van Limburg Stirum 

was the guest of honor at an elabor- 
ately appointed luncheon given by Mis. 
H. A. van Coenen Torchiana, wife of 
the Consul General of the Netherlands, 
in the Gray Room at the Fairmont last 
week 

A cordial welcome is being ex- 
tended to Mrs. C. Frederick Kohl, who 
is here from New York visiting at the 
home of Mrs. Charles Templeton 
Crocker. This is Mrs. Kohl's first 
visit in almost three years. Mrs. Rob- 
ert Mayes Smith gave a luncheon at 
the Burlingame Country Club to bring 
together Mrs. Kohl's friends. 

Mrs. Seward B. McNear entertain- 
ed at luncheon at the Town and Coun- 
try Club Friday afternoon, compli- 
menting Mrs. Frederick W. McNear, 
who since her return from her wed- 
ding trip, has been feted at a series of 
delightful affairs. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Kendall 

Armsby will take their departure on 
August 24 for the East, where they will 
visit for several weeks. Mrs. Ezra 
Stimson gave a luncheon at the Fair- 



The 
Palace 

FOR 

Exclusive 
Ente rtain ment 

Management of 

Halsey E. Manwaring 




CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR AUGUST 20, 1921 



13 



mont hotel on Monday complimenting 
Mrs. Armsby. 

Dinners 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Blyth gave 

a dinner Saturday at their Burlingame 
home. It was the first entertainment 
tn be given by the Blyths since the 
automobile accident in which Mr. 
Blyth was injured. He was in a hos- 
pital for two weeks and returned to 
his home several days ago. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Bosqui will 

give a dinner next Thursday evening, 
August 25. for Miss Margaret Madison. 
who will be married to Mrs. Bosqui's 
son, Mr. Wakefield Baker on Septem- 
ber 7. The dinner guests will be the 
members of bridal party and several 
other friends. 

Mr. and Mrs. Julian Thorne were 

hosts at a dinner party at the Hotel 
St. Francis Monday night, having more 
than a dozen of their friends from 
down the peninsula. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Morgan were 

guests of honor at a dinner given 
by Mr. and Mrs. John Rounsfell last 
week. 

The others present were: Messrs. 
and Mesdamcs Perry Cumberson, 
Frederick Dorn, Randolph V. Whiting 
and Peter F. Jurs. 

Teas 

Mrs. Warner Bliss gave a bridge 

party and tea Thursday afternoon for 
Miss Marian Wirtner, whose marri- 
age to Lieutenant Hubert Anderson, l". 
S. N., will take place next mouth. 

Mrs. Lester B. Cranz was hostess 

at a small tea at her new home Tues- 
day, having some of her friends in as a 

compliment to Miss Ruth Prior, who is 
to be married soon. 

In Town and Out 

Mr. and Mrs. Fentriss Mill are 

back at their Burlingame home from 

\\ ebber Lake, where they spent a fort- 
night at the country club. Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry Foster Dutton are still at 

the club and plan to remain a few 
weeks longer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel C. Jackling 

and Dr. and Mrs Herbert Mien have 

returned to Woodside from Lake Ta- 
bor and the Yellowstone. They will 
be at the Lawson place in Woodside for 

another month. 

Dean and Mrs. J Wilmer tiresham 

have returned to town after a month's 
sojourn at YosemitC and Asilomar. 

Mr. and Mis Jack Winston left 

Saturday for Los Angeles to \isit his 
parents and sisters. Mr. and Mrs. I 1'.. 
Winston and Miss Marguerita and 
Miss Carolina Winston. This is the 
first visit south of the young couple 
since their marriage hist winter Mrs. 

Winston was Miss Ethel Maroi 

Mrs. Valentine Hush is here 

Vermont visiting her daughter, 
Giarles Harvey Bentlcy and far 

San Rafael. 



Mr. and Mrs. George B. Kelham 

and Mr. Bruce Kelham have returned 
to their home in Sea Cliff, after having 
enjoyed a month's visit in San Rafael. 
Mr. Bruce Kelham will shortly take 
his departure for the East, where he 
will enter one of the preparatory 
schools. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Oxnard and 

Mr. and Mrs. William Hinckley Tay- 
lor will remain at their camp until the 
first of September. They have been 
away all summer and have been en- 
tertaining informally, from time to 
time, visitors from this city. 

Mrs. William H. Crocker, Miss 

Helen Crocker and Charles Crocker, 
who have been in France for several 
months, arrived at their home in Bur- 
lingame Sunday. Mrs. Crocker has 
been greatly pleased by the progress 
made by the building restoration work 
done in the rural district, which she 
has been assisting with her means and 
through the co-operation of the archi- 
tects and artisans that have co-oper- 
ated with her. 

Messrs. Roy Pike, Gordon and 

Raymond Armsby are in Los Angeles. 
passing considerable time at the Am- 
bassador golf links with friends. 

Mrs. Louise Crichton, wdio went 

abroad months ago with Mrs. Michel 
Weill, has returned from Europe and 
is visiting at the home of her sister 
Mrs. Anne Martin, on Russian hill. 

Miss Jean Boyd, who is visiting 

her aunt. Mrs. Allen Lewis, in ( Iregon, 
will return to her home in San Rafael 
at the end of next week. Mrs. G 
1). Boyd will be a week-end guest of 

Mrs. Charles X. Felton at Redlands. 

Intimations 

Mr. Jay Fassett of Elmira, New 

York, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Sloat 
Fassett, the latter of whom was Miss 

Jennie t rocker of Sacramento, has 

gone on the stage and is a member of 
Man- Klaw's "Sotiya" company, which 
opened at the i''irty-cighth Street 

Theater Monday night. Mr. Fassett is 

one of the four children of Mr. and 
Mrs. Fassett. The others are Mr. 
Truman and Mr. Newman Fassett and 
Mrs. Ethelbert Nevin. 

Mr. and Mrs. W illard Chamherlin 

and their son will return to their home 
in Pittsburg the latter part of the 
month. Mrs. Chamberlin's mother. 

Mrs Charles Mcintosh Keeney, will 
remain here until October. 
^^llr. Talbot and his mother. Mrs. 
Andrew Talbot, arrived from I'.. 
Tuesday and went to their home i: 
Rafael, which they have not occupied 
in several years. They have lived in 
Boston while Mr. Talbot was a student 
at Harvard. Miss Miriam Morrison of 
New York, who was at Bryn Mawr 
with Miss Williamson, will come to 
San Francisco for the wedding anil 
will be a bridesmaid. Miss Hart will 
be in the wedding party and the 
other attendants w ill be Miss Julia Van 



Fleet, Miss Louise Braden, Miss Mar- 
ian Kergan, Miss Dorothea William- 
son and Miss Jean Webster. 




HOTEL ST. FRANCIS ! 

; • -SAN FRANCISCO- • -I 

A BIG HOTEL § 

J WHERE THE LITTLE THINGS COUNT! 



The 

Fable Room 

decorated with conceits 
from Aesop's Fables 
offers you a quiet and 
dignified atmosphere in 
which to entertain your 
friends at 

Luncheon 
or 
Dinner 



I Hos. J. COLEMAN 
Manager 



ELECTROLYSIS 

Eyebrows arched and moles, warts and 
i emoved by 

esl Improved multiple needle mac! i. 

Work guaranteed. 

MADAM STIVER 

133 Geary street. Suite 723 Whitney Building 

Mi. m,' Dousing 
Oakland, Suite 434. First Nat. Bank Building 
and 8621 



.1. !•;. BIRMINGHAM Main t'orri.lor 

* * * * * * 
PALACE HOTEL Opposite Rose Room 

* * • • * * 
U-.tt ! In Platinum 

* • * • * • 
REMODELING Old Styles Into New 

* * • • * • 
UNIQUE DESIGNS Time-Keeping Watches 

* * * * « * 
FINE JEWELRY Of All Descriptions 

» . • • « • 

F.XPERT Repair Work 



l»IW "lORK 

a trk.\tmt:nt it 

AND RAW 

perfect, 

THE FRANCES FOX INSTITUTE 

Hair 

506 Crocker Bldg., Market and Post 
Phone Sutter 5118 









and 







14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 





LFINA NOAV 




Everywhere Somewhat Easier condi- 
tions obtain as to money. Credit con- 
ditions are gradually "thawing out" 
but it is a long hard trail to normalcy. 
The American people have only been 
touched as far as war conditions, and 
their aftermath, is concerned and they 
cannot therefore have anything' like an 
adequate conception of the conditions 
now prevailing everywhere, except in 
America. These conditions must be 
ameliorated before America may be 
said to approach normalcy. We are 
certainly better off than we were six 
months, or six weeks ago and there 
is a much freer breathing among busi- 
ness men and the bankers are losing 
some of the worried looks they have 
been carrying for so long. 
* * * 

The situation in Ireland has a big 
influence on conditions in financial cir- 
cles all over the world. The cable 
news brings word that de Valera has 
taken the stand that Ireland has a 
right to secede entirely from Great 
Britain and the answer of Great Bri- 
tain can take but one form and that is 
that such a right by Ireland is not a 
matter debatable and that the only 
resort, in the final analysis, is a resort 
to the arbitrament of arms. 






There is one great quality the Brit- 
isher has and that is his enormous re- 
serve fund of patience. Ireland may 
be very near the point where she has 
exhausted that patience and, in that 
event, it would be real war that Great 
Britain would wage on Ireland, a war 
of subjugation. What has gone on in 
the past in resisting the so-called IrisTi 
Republican army will be but child's 
play in comparison to what may come 
to be if Great Britain undertook to 
bring Ireland into the fold by force. It 
is not the province of the editor of 
this column to fully analyze such a 
question ; it is mentioned because of its 
bearing on the world-wide state of 
financial affairs. The condition of 
Great Britain's rebellious subjects in 
Ireland has just as much and more of 
a bearing on general business as the 
condition in the Balkans, in Turkey, 
Mesopotamia, in China or in any other 
disturbed quarter of the globe. 
* * * 

Retail distribution continues to be 
accelerated through the lavish use of 
the advertising columns of the daily 
press. It is an astonishing thing that 
the advertising managers of big retail 
firms should continue to ignore the 
value of the weekly papers that go 
directly into the homes of those who 
can afford to buy. There are fewer 
blanks in the weekly than in the daily. 



This may be best understood when put 
this way — thousands of those who read 
the dailies are not buyers at all. And 
the cost of daily newspaper advertise- 
ments is built up on the blanks and 
the buyers. In wholesale lines there 
is a slight improvement in the volume 
of business done. There are, however, 
very optimist views expressed as to 
business for the Fall season. 

* * * 

Manufacturers of cement report 
more activity. There is a more active 
demand in all lines of building material. 
This demand has been stimulated by 
the resumption of work and by the 
fact that, in many lines, there has 
been a drop in prices. There is some 
improvement in the iron and steel in- 
dustry and an increased demand has 
given an impetus to business. 

Food prices show only small further 
declines, especially fruits and vege- 
tables. This may be, in part, due to 
the establishment of the farmer's free 
market in San Francisco. 

* * * 

Affairs in China are disturbing busi- 
ness conditions in the Asian countries 
everywhere and these disturbances 
find echo in this country. In Russia, 
both European and Asiatic, we have a 
vast piece of the world's surface pros- 
cribed as a producer of raw materials 
and as a purchaser of manufactured 
product. We have closed frontiers 
which must sooner or later be opened 
to trade. Russia is dying of hunger 
brought on by the dreamers who are 
just now in control of its political des- 
tiny. 

It can only be repeated that until 
these difficulties and many others are 
ironed out normalcy will not return. 

In this country we are making great 
strides in the right direction but we 
have a long road to travel. The pres- 
ent administration at Washington has 
taken hold of things energetically and 
efficiently. It has heeded the cry of 
the country that the cost of govern- 
ment must be lowered and it is being 
lowered a million at a clip. Business 
men are being placed in charge of the 
affairs of the people and we may now 
expect better results to ensue. It is 
the action at Washington has brought 
about a feeling of confidence. 

* * * 

Locally, as elsewhere, money is eas- 
ier and the bankers are certainly more 
cheerful and more accomodating than 
they were a short while ago. The in- 
dustrial situation, the establishing of 
the American Plan among the builders, 
has had the effect of encouraging those 



who have money to invest. The in- 
ability of the union leaders to make 
strikes stick, the desire of men to work 
and to escape the union domination, 
and the success attendant on the cam- 
paign to lower the price of building 
materials have contributed to bring 
about a greater activity. 

* * » 

There should be a more efficient 
campaign carried on to bring factories 
to San Francisco, now that we have 
thrown off the yoke of the union bos- 
ses. We should double and treble our 
industrial population in the next two 
or three years. Wc have plenty of 
waste places that might be filled with 
factories, plenty of similar places 
which should be covered with the 
small homes of the contented workers. 

* * * 

Shipping — Although the strike is 
practically over there arc but few 
ships that were tied up being taken to 
sea. Shipping men do not look for- 
ward to any great activity until the 
matter of financing foreign trade has 
been met by the big financiers of the 
country. It is true that a number of 
very heavily capitalized corporations 
have been formed and that these do 
attempt to furnish the sinews of war 
to exporters and importers. In many 
instances these organizations have 
their own allied organizations in the 
export and import business to whom 
they furnish the money necessary to do 
business. * * * 

The passage of "protective" tariff 
laws does not help us in our foreign 
trade and sooner or later we will come 
back to some sort of reciprocal ar- 
rangement with those countries with 
whom it would be profitable to expand 
our trade relations or to establish new 
and more favorable conditions. Just 
at this time the passage of the Fordncv 
Bill will have the effect of a deadener 
on our foreign trade with many coun- 
tries, especially is this so regarding 
Latin American countries and nota- 
bly so as to Argentina. Whether it is 
wiser to levy or not to levy a protec- 
tive tariff is one of the great unsolved 
questions — unsolved because the Am- 
erican people will not give this very 
important matter even momentary 
thought. When it is realized that the 
American pays the tax. and that it is 
a very heavy burden, then the Ameri- 
can will begin to make a further study 
of the situation as to the merits or 
demerits of a low or a high tariff or 
no tariff at all. 

* * * 

Insurance— Old Moral Hazard is 
showing his grizzled head and grin- 
ning away at a great rate because of 
the figure he cut in the big percentage 
of losses for the months of this year 
just gone by. And this accounts for 
the increase of rates the underwriters 
threaten to levy on the insured every- 
where. When it is taken in consider- 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER POR AUGUST 20. 1921 



IS 



ation that the insurance business lias 
fallen off about twenty-five per cent 
and that the losses are fully sixty per 
cent it is realized why rates have a 
tendency to go up. Old Moral Hazard 
never does come on the scene except 
when business conditions are bad and 
therefore the cure for the present tend- 
ency to raise rates is more business. 
When good times come risks are less 
risky and there is little or no moral 
hazard to contend with. Business, 
generally speaking, is dull. 

James W. Going is the agent for the 
North American Fire Insurance Com- 
pany of Des Moines, Iowa. The same 
agency is Pacific Coast representative 
for the Peninsular Fire. 

The agent for the Fidelity-Phoenix 
in California and Nevada is S. E. Pher- 
son with headquarters at San Fran- 
cisco. * # * 

Mining — There has been a little fi- 
nancing of mines in the last two or 
three weeks and development work has 
been more brisk. The general apathy 
which prevails in business circles con- 
tinues to have its effect on mining and 
the present slight improvement has 
kept pace with the improvement in 
business generally. In the stock mar- 
ket it is quite generally dull with an 
occasional flare up of interest which 
may be genuine or which may be in- 
duced by "wash sales". There is 
nothing hectic or startling going on in 
the Mining Stock Exchange. And 
there isn't going to be for some lime 
to come, in the opinion of those who 
play the game regularly. 

* * * 

Ship Building — The great ship build- 
ing plants around San Francisco bay 
have reduced their working force in 
accord with the lack of contracts to 
keep them busy. The Moore Ship 
Building Company and others are now 
finishing what contracts they may have 
on hand and are preparing for an in- 
tensive campaign to secure repair work 
for their yards. A very large number 
of men, formerly employed in these 
plants are now either unemployed or 
have transferred their energies to 
other kinds of work. Of course, it 
could not be expected that the vast 
amount of shipping that was necessary 
during the war should continue in de- 
mand after the war was over. The 

yards are most of them splendidly 
equipped lor the repair work which 
they contemplate carrying on. 

* * * 

It is very curious that having gath- 
ered such an immense industrial popu- 
lation noiu of those who have been 
interested in ship building should have 
turned their attention to other indus- 
trial lines in order to keep the work- 
ing forces intact and at work in the 
bay communities. It shows a woeful 
lack of foresight or efficiency, a lack 
of vision or a shameful carelessin 
to the future fate of those who helped 



build the "bridge of ships" across the 
sea. It is said that a ship yard may 
not be transformed into any kind of a 
factory profitably. This may 1» 
but it is also true that here were a lot 
of men who could easily have been 
turned to good use in some other plant 
or in new plants, manufacturing arti- 
cles of some kind or other useful to 
their fellow-men. What has become 
of them? Have they drifted back to 
the farms, whence many of them 
came? We think not. We believe 
there are many more unemployed 
than we have any idea there are and 
that something should be done to ga- 
ther this producing force together 
again and let it function for the bene- 
fit of all. We want more factories. 
We should have more factories and, if 
we cannot keep this brawn busy build- 
ing ships, let us keep it busy fabrica- 
ting or building in some other direc- 
tion. In this great West of ours there 
never should be unemployment and 
there is good reason for such a thing 
to exist, if we make up our minds that 
all should be employed who will work. 
The man or the set of men who wish to 
build factories here should be given 
every sort of encouragement. There 
should be a temporary suspension of 
taxation. Bonuses might be given. 
Land might be given as factory sites. 
Long payment terms on land may be 
arranged. We should make known 
the fact that we welcome the coming of 
the manufacturing establishment. The 
prosperous metropolis is that in which 
the dinner pail of the factory worker 
is ever evident. 



The Voice of Love — "Oh Henry, ex- 
claimed his wife as she threw her arms 
rapturously round his neck. "I do love 
you so! Don't forget to leave me a 
couple of fives when you go to town 
tlii- morning, will you. dear?" 

"And this," muttered Henry, as he 
gently disengaged himself from her 
fond embrace, "this is what I call being 

pressed for money." — Houston Post. 



Waste of Money — Insurance Agent 
— I dropped in to remind you that your 
policy expires tomorrow and to ask 
you to renew it. 

Economist — Very sorry, sir. but 
this is the 10th year that I have been 
insured in your company and nothing 
has happened, so I've made up my mind 
to try another company. — B< 
Transcript. 

Aspiring Young Actress — How 

should one register emotion? Movie 
Fan — To show the formation of any 
heroic resolution a man shuts his 
and swallows hard, while a woman 
opens her eyes wide, parts her lips, 
and breathes rapidly. Aspiring Young 
Actress — And the other emotions. — 
love. hate, fear? Movie Fan — Simply 
do the same thing. — Film Fun. 



New Arrivals in 
Men's Fall Suits 

— Good looking, well 
tailored suits, built 
for business wear. In 
Brown, Grey and Hair- 
line Stripes. Remark- 
able values at 

$40.op 
HASTINGS 

Clothing Company 

Post Street at Kearny .-. San Francisco 



Eyes Guaranteed 

Bother 00 Work at 
You? 27 7th St. 

DR.J.P.JUHL 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

His ;■. practical system of placing 
manuscripts lor publication, which is im- 
portant to people who write. Frank 
criticism and revision are also available. 

1174 Phelan Building San Francisco 



^M'HEN in Santa Clara Valley see the 
valley from the sceni£ electric lines. 
Trolley trips start from San Jose or 
Palo Alto. 

PENINSULA RAILWAY CO. 

SAN JOSE, CAL. 



CoronA 

"TIi< PtrMMl Writl>f ■■rtlu" 

Fold It Up 
Take It With You 

Typewrite 

Anywhere 

Call or write for 
Booklet 

$S0.0O-WITH CASE 

CORONA TYPEWRITER CO., Inc. 
Phone ' irket Street 

Sutler San Francisco 




Hi - Stand for the Best in Business Training 


/ 


W\ 


Munson fi 


^Sl School 




FOR 


Private 


Secretaries 


600 SUTTER ST 


FRANKLIN 306 


Send 


fOT Catalog 



16 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



PUE/U 



TJRJD'S WAND job . 

Obey No Wand but Pleasure's.— Tom Moore 



Notable Acting at Alcazar 

A bit hard on governors, "The Un- 
known Woman." Let us hope that 
there were no stray ones in the ^aud- 
ience to witness the villainy of "Joel 
Emerson". He was all kinds of a pol- 
luted politician. And perfectly horrid 
to his wife! The plot of this four act 
drama is somewhat thin, but the char- 
acters are interesting, the situations 
good, and the most is made of the pro- 
duction bv a large company of Alca- 
zar players. All the male members 
were called into action, bringing their 
evening suits along. Lined up in the 
first act, in brave array of shining 
shirt - fronts, were Dudley Ayres, 
Thomas Chatterton, Ben Erway, Fred- 
erick Green, Charles Yule and Bert 
Chapman, — the flower and beauty of 
the Alcazar. 

Chatterton does some excellent work 
as the governor. Never did the pleas- 
ing (and pleased) Mr. Ayres have a 
part better suited to his holier-than- 
thou personality, than the wronked he- 
ro of this play. Little Miss Gladys 
George wore a big bad blonde wig but 
even that could not hide the fact that 
she is very, very pretty. Her enunci- 
ation and vocal expression are improv- 
ing, and she showed genuine depth of 
feeling in some of her heavy scenes. 
But despite the fact that the govern- 
or's wife had all our sympathy and no 
end of beautiful clothes, it cannot be 
said that the part brings out Miss 
George's best attractive qualities. Ben 
Erway, looking very fit after his long 
(seemed to us) vacation, put his per- 
sonality into a negative part, and wore 
his evening clothes like a gentleman. 
Bert Chapman's wig was too utterly 
funny for words ; one of the puffy 
kind, with bits of cotton-wool sewed 
on to denote advancing years. Having 
played so many humorous parts with 
such solemnity, it is rather a pity for 
him to be hilariously funny in this 
somewhat serious and dignified part. 
Anna MacNaughton added her artistic 
touch to the performance in a brief 
interval as the hearty housekeeper. 
The insane wife of our noble martyr, 
our dear Dudley, was the opportunity 
of a life-time for a certain type of 
actress ; the part was taken by Miner- 
va Ureka, who missed it. Miss Gladys 
Emmons had a small part made de- 
lightful by her agreeable voice and 
diction. The orchestra was in fine 
form. 

Orpheum 

An excellent bill, start to finish. It 
would be difficult to single out the most 
popular number, though Ed Flanagan 
and Alex. Morrison furnish the major- 



ity of laughs with their 'Lesson in 
Golf.' Theodore Bekefi and his three 
talented dancers from Petrograd 
showed us enough to make us realize 
why the former Czar liked the job. 
Then Louise Dresser and Jack Gardner 
demonstraled what can be done with 
the alphabet, while Jean Adair and 
Co. made some of the men patrons 
understand what terrible brutes they 
are — on an empty stomach. Some were 
dreadfully shocked by Jean Barrios 
when he disrobed in public. It was 
remarked in our bearing that he was 
correctly dressed, when undressed, 
wig and all. To cheer up the tired 
business woman, Ona Munson present- 
ed some likely chaps who can move 
mighty lively. There were others, too, 
equally as good, and it is to be hoped 
none of the 'Fans' will miss the sights 
this week. 

Maitland Playhouse 

The Maitland has been 'all dolled up' 
inside and out, and looks mighty fine 
in its new costumes. The theare will 
be opened earl)' in September with a 
Shaw play, we understand, and Mr. 
Maitland may be relied upon to give us 
the kind of thing this coming season 
that the discriminating theatre-goer 
yearns for and gets very little of. In 
the selection of plays Maitland seldom 
errs. A look down the list of his pro- 
ductions since his theatre began will 
show a fine sense of what is dramat- 
ically important, and rare good judg- 
ment on his part. In the matter of act- 
ors Mr. Maitland has been less fortu- 
nate, and sometimes the little theatre 
has been saddened by serious ineffi- 
ciency of stage management. This 
playhouse, with its ambition and 
achievement, is of great value to San 
Francisco's theatre world, and in the 
interests of "The Best" should be sup- 
ported in its every effort. 



Famous Star for Orpheum 

It is a big thing for the Orpheum 
to announce that it has secured Wil- 
liam H. Crane on its list of talent. That 
famous dramatic star will appear on 
next weeks bill in a George Ade sketch 
of extraordinary brilliancy, it is said 
Rarely does Mr. Ade write anything 
which is not very brilliant. Veteran 
playgoers remember Crane's various 
masterpieces with genuine pleasure. 

His depiction of one of the "Two 
Romeos" when he co-starred with 
Stuart Robson in Shakespeare's "Com- 
edy of Errors" was a classic in 1877. 
From those days to these he has scored 
again and again in the admiration of 
his devotees with such characters and 
plays as "Senator Preston B. Plumb of 
Kansas" in "The Senator," as David 
Harum in the famous play from the 
book by that name, as "Father" in 
George Ade's "Father and the Boys," 
and as "Old Nick" in "The New Henri- 
etta." 

A spendthrift son at college, an as- 
tute politician and vamp are the prin- 
cipal characters in Ade's sketch for Mr. 
Crane. The latter impersonates the 
politician, and it certainly will be a fine 
performance. 

Others on next weeks bill commenc- 
ing Sunday evening are : Haruko 
Omuki famous Japanese prima donna ; 
Carson and Willard, "laugh doctors"; 
the four Lamy Brothers; Scanlon 
Dcnno Brothers and Scanlon; Mile 
Madje the girl with a divine form. 

Louise Dresser and Jack Gardner, 
Ed Flannagan and Alex Morrison will 
remain another week. 



California 

"The Whistle", 'Bill' Dart's latest 
picture, is a departure from his previ- 
ous efforts, for he discards the spurs 
and six-shooter to become a factory 
foreman. The theme is mainly to do 
with revenge, and is built upon the old 
story of Capital and Labor, though 
Hart injects several novelties and 
stages the usual light. Everyone 
seemed pleased with the finish, and had 
cause to be. for the old favorite did 
some fine acting. The most interesting 
additional feature was 3rd installment 
of Opera vs. Jazz ; it ma}' not be a sign 
of the times, but at any rate it is 
gratifying to note that the former is 
winning, hands down. 



Alcazar 

"Moonlight and Honeysuckle" a de- 
lightful romantic comedy which served 
as a starring vehicle for dainty Ruth 
Chatterton has been obtained for pro- 
duction at the Alcazar beginning Sun- 
day afternoon, August 21st. Origin- 
ally presented by Henry Miller under 



SAM FRAHC1SC0 



m ^v>ot*iu* 



I 



J <&vpW\&\oux L B " 




25 and 50c 



MATINEES 

DAILY LO AND 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 

AND THE SAME GREAT SHOWS 

Smoking permitted in dress circle 
and loges 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR AUGUST 20, 1921 



17 



the title of "The Merry Month of 
May", the play radiates youth and love 
and touches Oil the deeper things of 
life. It is sparkling with clever wit 
and humor and should prove a note- 
worthy attraction. The leading role 
will be assumed by Gladys George who 
should be a revelation in the character 
made notable by Miss Chatterton. It 
is distinctly an ingenue type of part 
and one in which the Alcazar's leading 
woman should be at her best. Dudley 
Ayres as a westerner who comes to 
the metropolis on a visit and who 
meets his fate there will have a role of 
importance and one upon which the 
author, George Scarborough, evident- 
ly put much thought. 

The story tells of Senator Baldwin 
and his two eligible daughters who 
have been visiting in the far West at 
their father's ranch. While sojourn- 
ing in New York they are the subject 
of attention of the young men of the 
vicinity. In order to test the love of 
three of them Anita Baldwin, played 
by Gladys George, invents a story of 
a hidden past. All save the westerner 
desert her and then she reveals that 
the tale is an imaginary one. 

Marie Dunkle, specially engaged, will 
make her first Alcazar appearance. In 
the supporting cast will be Thomas 
Chatterton, Charles Yule, Ben Erway, 
Florence Printy, Anna MacNaughton 
and the full strength of the Alcazar 
company. 

National Pen League 



Techau's New Revue 



The National Pen League has open- 
ed a California Chapter, with Mrs, 
I icrge McGowan at its head and Miss 
Ida M. Ross its able organizer. At a 
delightful evening entertainment at the 
Fairmont Hotel on Thursday last sev- 
eral speakers, including Mr. Lawrence 
of the Journal, Mr. Douglas of the 
Bulletin and Miss Annie Wilde of the 
Chronicle, the purposes and plans ol 
the Club were set forth and the large 
gathering of literary and artistic nun 
and women given an opportunity to 
become members. Miss Susan Foun- 
tain of the Writers' Bureau, Phenlan 
Building, will be glad to give informa- 
tion and literature to those who are 
interested in the work of this impor- 
tant oraginzation. 



A Royal Dinner 



The view of the city and !>;n from the 
Fairmont has been eulogized by promi- 
nent travelers from ever) part of the 

globe. Their encomiums, howevei 
not confined to the scenery, for the chef 
at the Fairmont is not surpassed in the 

menu he places before you by any in 
the country and travelers are the first 
to appreciate good eating. The Fair- 
mont has a special lunch and dinner 
that is served exquisitely and the price 
is a drawing card. 



A new Revue is being offered at 
Teehau Tavern, headed by Ruby 
Adams, Evelyn Francoeur, Rene Ter- 
ry and Stella French. Its numbers 
are original and the costuming is 
striking. 

The inimitable jazz syncopation of 
Elliston Ames and the Teehau Tavern 
Orchestra lures all true lovers of danc- 
ing to the big oval floor. "Lucky 
Dances" are a popular feature, and the 
prizes now are Melachrino Cigarettes 
and Gruenhagen's celebrated Blue Rib- 
bon Chocolates. 

The after-theatre supper service is 
a specialty that is universally popular 
and the table d'hote dinner served 
nightly is the finest in town. 



Wedding Presents — The choicest va- 
riety to select from at Marsh's who is 
now permanently located at Post and 
Powell Streets. 



Gentlewomen— 

A trade that is of 

great importance: 

THE CARE OF THE HAIR 

THE CARE OF THE FACE 

THE CARE OF THE NAILS 

Hairdressing Marceling 
Cosgrove's Hair Store 

Established 25 years 

360 Geary Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone: KEARNY 3842 

Berkeley Store: 2331 Telegraph Ave. 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 

"Half Dollar" Specials for the Busy Man 

151 Powell Street 



Phones Sutter 3169, Kearny 4978 

United Flower & Supply Co., Inc. 

FLORISTS 

We grow our own stock and, with ex- 
tensive nurseries to draw from, can 
give unusual values. It will pay 
you to view our flowers and 
prices. 

448 Bush Street San Francisco 



* \lk, -\»dcot«ut m^u, * - 



18 POWELL ST. 

%>s "RVajkot St 




4figk£r 



136 OFARRELL ST. 

Opposite ©rpfeeiutu Tfceitre. 

Courteously Saves h pairon? with, $ood foooC 
ii moderife prices in pleisui surrounding xwt wrtn excellent Itlujic. 



C^ASA DL.L KEY cTufornu 

THE MILLION DOLLAR FIREPROOF HOTEL 

The ideal spot for your summer outing with its warm beach hathing: 
dancing; good music; artistic home-like, spacious lobby. 

This is a most wonderful place for children. Beautiful playgrounds: 
sanitary warm hathing pool; swimming instructors: saddle ponies for 
children. Special kitchenette where maid can prepare food for young 
children. 

Motor roads in fine condition via Sargents, Chittenden Pass and Wat- 
sonville, on the Coast Route via I. a Honda. The Southern Pacific offers 
special round trip, week-end rates as well as tickets good for several 
weeks. 

Cottage City, operated on the European plan, is also under the same 
management as Casa Del Rey. 

Correspondence regarding rates for families with maids and children 
solicited. Special rates by the week or for extended stays of a month or 
two. Add] 

CASA DEL REY, Santa Cruz, Calif. 
MORRIS & WARNER, Proprietors 

TELEPHONE 600 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



AUGUST 20. 1921 




"The Life of Christ" 

This is a book that demands careful 
reading. The subject calls for res- 
pectful attention, aside from the fact 
that a great preacher has written the 
work— the Reverend R. J. Campbell, 
Vicar of Christ Church Westminster. 
In Great Britain Mr. Campbell's talents 
are not discussed. He is accepted as 
one of the fine pulpit orators of his 
generation, whose originality and 
strength of thought has often caused 
orthodox Christians to wonder whether 
he had not led his congregation into 
the disputed land of heterodoxy. But 
invariably those who may have come 
to criticise the famous vicar's theology 
have gone home convinced of the sin- 
cerity of his expositions that the often- 
er they sat beneath his pulpit the 
greater their respect for his splendid 
talents and sense of truth. If power 
to attract large congregations could 
be accepted as the highest test of a 
preacher, the Reverend Mr. Campbell 
is matchless. His fame is world wide. 

Of all men this great preacher 
should be able to present to thoughtful 
readers a serious examination of the 
life of Christ; his scholarship and an- 
alytical mind fit him for the difficult 
task. For to do the work well, is far 
from easy. Famous pens have dealt 
with the history of Christ from various 
angles, since Ernest Renan, the French 
critical philospher and former priest, 
wrote "La Vie de Christ" in 1863 and 
incurred the displeasure of his church 
by denial of divinity to the founder of 
the Christian sect. 

The sectarian world has changed in 
many ways since the days of Renan. 
The narrowness of the critical field 
in the French philosopher's time has 
been greatly enlarged. Lately a dis- 
tinct note of dissatisfaction with the 
orthodox dogma of Christianity has 
been heard in the secular press, which 
in the nineteenth century was never 
struck by writers for the public. Jour- 
nalism is an index of the trend of pub- 
lic thought, for while the journalists 
profess to lead the public their pro- 
vince is to follow. They first make 
sure that the chord they are about to 
strike will please their readers, and in 
proportion to its acceptance by the 
public they emphasize or diminish it. 

The curiosity of the unlearned public 
to know more of the facts of Christ's 
life and his doings as accepted by 
scholars was never so great in Amer- 
ica as now. 

The universities have inculcated a 
desire for free investigation of all 
scholarship and the search for histori- 
cal facts relative to the founder of 



Christianity do not satisfy Agnostics. 
The result is disappointment which 
finds expression in newspaper articles 
and literature tinctured with deism or 
atheism. 

The life of Christ by such a student 
of theology as the Reverend Mr. 
Campbell, will be welcomed by the vast 
number of thoughtful people who lack 
the confidence to form their own judg- 
ment on a matter not within the scope 
of their information. His scholarship 
and judgment are combined with de- 
lightful felicit of style which will make 
his book prized by all readers. D. Ap- 
pleton and Company, New York are the 
publishers. The price is $3.00. 

Mr. Campbell is an Oxonian. Be- 
fore his becoming Vicar of Christ 
Church, Westminster he was minister 
of the City Temple London. Lately he 
has occupied the pulpit of the First 
Congregational Church in San Fran- 
cisco. 



Sunbeams 



Parcel Post — -"Any mail for me to- 
day, Zeb?" 

"Nothing in letters or dry-goods. 
Wait a minute and I'll look in the ice 
box." — Louisville Courier- Journal. 



HATTIE : Nubbs' bride worships 
him, doesn't she? 

MATTIE: Well, she places burnt 
offerings before him three times a day. 



"How old are you?" asked the judge. 
"Dunno!" was the surly reply. "When 
were you born?" "What's de use o' 
tellin' yer? Yer haint goin' t' gimme 
a birthday present, are yer? — Boston 
Transcript. 



"Are you the President-elect?" "Yes, 
my friend. What can I do for you?" 
"Not a thing. I don't want an office. 
Don't even want to offer you any good 
advice." "My friend I am sorry the 
cabinet appointments have been made 
up." — Louisville Courier- Journal. 



"What is sadder than a man who los- 
es his last friend?" "A man who 
works for his board and loses his ap- 
petite." — Stanford Chaparral. 



First Postal Clerk — Aha? back from 
your vacation, eh ? Second Postal 
Clerk — Yup, back to the old stamping 
ground. — Cornell Widow. 



Voice (from next room) — A pair of 
queens. Fair and Warmer (in unison) 
— Oh, I do believe they are peeking 
through the transom! — Virginia Reel. 



"Beloved," he cried, throwing him- 
self at his wife's feet, "we have lost all 
save honor." "How awkward !" she 
sobbed. Just the thing we don't need 
if we've got to live by our wits." — 
London Winning Post. 



Mr. Nouveau-Riche (opening mail) 
— Look at this! The Duke of Bas- 
tos addressing me as "Dear Friend." 
Mrs. Nouveau-Riche — How much does 
he want? — Paris Le Rire. 



BERGEZ-FRANK'S 

Old Poodle Dog 

Luncheon 75c 

Served Daily— 11 to 2 

Choose full-sized portions from large menu, 

which is changed every day 

Excellent Food — Beautiful Environment 

Prompt Service 

French Dinner $1.50 

Including tax, week days and Sundays, 
5 to 9 p. m. 

DANCING 

421 BUSH STREET, Above Kearny 
Phone: Douglas 2411 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular ^Restaurant 

65 Post Street, Near Market Street 
Phone Kearny 4536 San Francisco, Calif. 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 
French and Italian Dinners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



For that stubborn cough use 
Old Snake Doctor's Cough Remedy 

SNAKE DRUG CO. 

Formerly G. Leipnitz & Co. 

Now Located at 
127-129 KEARNY STREET 



PENINSULAR PATRONAGE SOLICITED 

Post-Taylor Garage, Inc. 

530 TAYLOR STREET 



Washing and Greasing Cars in a 
careful and efficient manner 



"The House of Qualitv" 

GOLDEN GATE DAIRY LUNCH 

Block & McDonald, Props. 
SERVICE SUPREME HOME COOKING 

172 EDDY STREET 

Visit them after the show and meal times 

Prices Reasonable 



AUSTRALIA and NEW ZEALAND 

Bank of New South Wales 



(ESTABLISHED 1817) 



Paid-up Capital 

Reserve Fund 

Reserve Liability of 
Proprietors 



Aggregate Assets, 30th 
September, 1920 




$ 24,655.500.00 
16.750,000.00 

24,655,500.00 



$362,338,975.00 



SIR JOHN RUSSELL FRENCH, K. B. E., General Manager 

357 BRANCHES and AGENCIES in the Australian States. New Zealand, Fiji, Papua 

(New Guinea), and London. The Bank transacts every description of Australasian 

Banking Business. Wool and other Produce Credits Arranged 



Head Office 
GEORGE STREET, SYDNEY 



London Office 
29 THREADNEEDLE STREET, E. C. 2 
Agents: 
Bank of California, National Assn., Anglo & London-Paris Nat'l Bank, Crocker Nat'l Bank 



Member Federal Reserve System and Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 

SAVINGS 526 California Street, San Francisco, Calif. COMMERCIAL 

Mission Branch, Mission and 21st Streets 

Park-Presidio District Branch, Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

Halght Street Branch, Haight and Belvedere Streets 

JUNE 30th, 1921 

Assets - $ 71,383,431.14 Capital Actually Paid Up $1,000,000.00 

Deposits 67,792,431.14 Reserve and Contlng't F'ds 2,591,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund $357,157.85 

OFFICERS 
JOHN A. BUCK. President: GEO. TOURNY. Vice-Prea. and Manager: A. H. R. SCHMIDT, 
Vice-Pres. and Cashier; E. T. KRUSE, Vice-President; A. H. MOLLER, Secretary; WM. 
D. NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary; WILLIAM HERRMANN, GEO. SCHAMMEL, G. A. 
BELCHER, R. A. LAUENSTEIN, Assistant Cashiers; C. W. HEYER, Manaser Mission 
Branch; W. C. HEYER, Manager Park-Presidio District Branch; O. F. PAULSEN", Manager 
Haight Street Branch. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
JOHN A. BUCK, GEO. TOURNY', E. T. KRUSE, A. H. R. SCHMIDT, I. N. WALTER, 
HUGH GOODPELLOW, A. HAAS, E. N. VAN BEROF.N. ROBERT DOLLAR. E. A. 
CHRISTENSON, L. S. SHERMAN; GOODFELLOW, KELLS, MOORE & ORRICK, General 
Attorneys. 



BOND DEPARTMENT 

THE ANGLO AND LONDON-PARIS 

NATIONAL BANK 



Sutter ami Sansome Streets 

Phone Kearny 5600 
San Francisco. Calif. 



RF.COMMF.XDS 

Irrigation District Bonds 

FOR IX r I STMENT 

THEY ARE more secure than first mortgages because they rank ahead of 
first mortgages. INCOME TAX EXEMPT 

Yield from 6% to 6%% 

Let us send you our booklet THE IRRIGRATION DISTRICT BOND 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 Total Assets Over $479,000,000 $15,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds Of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

i WAD! AN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE KATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CAN \DA. and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.: MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

San Francisco Office: 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 



San Francisco Law School 

Third Floor Call Building 
Evening Sessions for Men and Women, 
7:30 to 9:30 
ittona for enrollment axe ' 

Write Today for Catalog 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 
Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 
Hotel 
Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 




»«Ul»tO '«'• 



N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



Normandie Garage 

Gough and Sutter Streets 

Washing r.nd Polishing Day and Night 

Cars Oiled and Greased 

Crank Cases Drained Free 

Home Garage Trade Solicited 



Phone Fillmore 4815 



Old Hampshire Bond 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 
The Standard Paper for Business Stationery. 
"Made a little better than seems necessary." 
The typewriter papers are sold in attractive 
and durable boxes containing five hundred 
perfect sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The 
manuscript covers are sold in similar boxes 
containing one hundred sheets. Order 
through your printer or stationer, or, if so 
desired, we will send a sample book showing 
the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

37-45 First Street San Francisco 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 

itor should leave the city without 
dining in the finest cafe in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) . 75c 
Dinner $1.75 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

ie Douglas 2133 



SALE STARTS 

MONDAY 




ALE 



SALE STARTS 

MONDAY 



22nd AUGUST 22nd 




SALE TO YOU $1275.00 (TOURING CAR) 
SALE TO YOU $1375.00 (SCOUT MODEL) 



NEW CARS 



Terms can be arranged OLD PRICE - $2050.00 (TOURING) 

NEW CARS OLD PRICE - $2170.00 (SCOUT) 



Terms can be arranged 
NEW CARS 



Must Be Sold - NOW - Must Be Sold 



MARK MOTOR COMPANY 

QAfP 800 VAN NESS AVENUE prospect 192 SAN FRANCISCO <\ATF 




AND 

(Saltfnrma Aflnrrttsfr 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



SATURDAY, AUGUST 27, 1921 



$5.00 PER YEAR 



Money, Western Made, Should be Used to Develop Western Trade! 

Over $ 1 50,000 expended in Foundry, Factory and Equipment in Oakland, Calif., 

to manufacture 

Vacuum-Groove Pinion Rings 

The One-Piece, Individually Cast, Hammered Piston Ring 
that has proved a revelation in motor car efficiency 

THE REASONS WHY IT IS THE BEST 



( 1 ) The Vacunm-G r < 
which hermetically seals the 
ring to the shoulder of piston, 
preventing slap and wear, which 
is not claimed by any other ring 
on the market today. 

(2) Outside Groove and ports 
which relieves friction against 
cylinder wall on the power 
stroke. 

(3 1 Peened for Tension by 
pi oper method, which 




uniform radial 

perfect fit at all points of cyl- 
inder wall. 

(4) 45° Angular Split with 
proper End Clearance. (Fancy 
Joints are selling points only 
without merit! 

Tace finished to exact 
~ize within .001" tolerance. 

Smooth Outside Ground 
Finish. 



Get the best while helping the Wait Install Vacuum-Groove Rings and make your old car new 



VACUUM-GROOVE PISTON RING CO. 



112 MARKET STREET 



California Distributers 
Telephone Kejrny 2498 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 



510 VAN NESS AVENUE 



MOTOR PARTS SALES CO. 

Telephone P«rk 9276 
Some choice territory vet available 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 




RESPONSIBILITY 

From the quarry 
where the rough gran- 
ite is hewn, through 
the processes of drill- 
ing, cutting, sawing, 
carving and polishing, 
to the final assembly 
and fabrication into 
the Memorial, one 
organization demon- 
strates by consistent 
success the value of 
this single responsi- 
bility for design, 
manufacture and in- 
stallation. 

One standard, there- 
fore, governs the de- 
sign and manufacture 
of the materials as 
well as the engineer- 
ing and construction 
service. 

Booklet 'DN' on Memo- 
rials, sent on request 



Raymond Granite Company, Inc. 



CONTRACTORS 



GRANITE— STONE- 
3 Potrero Avenue, San Francisco 



■BUILDING— MEMORIAL 

1350 Palmetto Street, Los Angeles 



Fire, Earthquake, Automobile, Use and Occupancy, Riot and Civil Commotion, 
Explosion, Plate Glass, Fidelity and Surety Bond 

INSURANCE 

THE LONDON & LANCASHIRE INSURANCE CO., Ltd. 

LONDON, ENGLAND Incorporated 1861 

ORIENT INSURANCE CO. of Hartford, Conn. 
Incorporated 1867 

LAW UNION & ROCK Insurance Co., Ltd. 

Of London — Founded 1806 

LONDON & LANCASHIRE INDEMNITY COMPANY of America 

Organized under the laws ol the State of New York — Incorporated January, 1915 

PACIFIC DEPARTMENT: 332 Pine Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

GEO. ORMOND SMITH, Manager 



J. B. CROWE 

3652 GEARY, at 1st Ave. 1055 Post St., at Polk 

PHONE FRANKLIN 7445 

building Glass of all Kinds beveling 




Spend Your Vacation 

IN THE 

BEAUTIFUL FEATHER RIVER COUNTRY 

THOUSANDS OF FEET ABOVE THE LEVEL OF THE SEA IN THE 

HEART OF THE SIERRAS 

Reached via 

WESTERN PACIFIC RAILROAD 

"The Feather River Route" 

Numerous Resorts along the famous FEATHER RIVER and near the 

many lakes and streams where fish and game are abundant 

Write for Illustrated Folders 

Ticket Offices: 50 POST STREET and FERRY BUILDING— Telephone Sutter 1651 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Company in America" 
FIRE, AUTOMOBILE, WINDSTORM, 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 
LIBERAL CONTRACTS REASONABLE RATES 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



PYRO-VOID 

Dr. Hoagland's HomeTreatment 



for... 



PYORRHEA 

Package with full directions sent 

in plain wrapper for One Dollar 

Satisfaction Guaranteed or Money Refunded 



DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 
Dental Specialist 

908 Market Street, at Powell 

San Francisco 

Dept. N. L. Established 1903 

SAVE YOUR TEETH 



An Ounce of Prevention Is 
Worth Many Pounds of 
Ten - mile - from - no- 
where - regret 

Let our expert automobile 
electricians inspect your 
starting, lighting and igni- 
tion systems regularly. It's 
the best insurance against a 
breakdown at an important 
moment. 

GUARANTEE BATTERY CO. 

MASTER AUTOMOBILE 
ELECTRICIANS 

955 Post Street SAN FRANCISCO 



CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 



me ? 

MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
thenewHEXEON 
process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

San Francisco 



V I N O B A R ! 

THE BRICK WITH THE KICK 

Make Your Own — It Is Simple 

Guaranteed not to make Vinegar 

VIN0BAR MFG. CO., San Francisco 

536-38 WASHINGTON STREET 
Agents "Wanted 




ESTABLISHED JULY 20, 185C 




fIB 



Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




VOL. XCIX 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY. AUGUST 27, 1921 



No. 35 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. 
Frederick Marriott, 382 Russ Building, Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco, Calif. Telephone Douglas 6S53. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif., Post Office as second-class mail matter. 

London Office: George Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year $5.00. Foreign, One 
year, $6.00; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not be 
responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 



State Treasurer Friend Richardson is no mean candi- 
date against Governor Stephens. He's heen a wizard in 
polling a heavy vote. 

* * * 

A Los Angeles bank employe is short several thousand 

and the question is asked — as usual— why did he do it? 
Because he was a thief, of course. That explains everything. 

* * * 

Nearly six million unemployed in the United States. 

announces the Secretary of Labor, but the family loaf of 
bread is still held by profiteers at 15 cents instead of 5 cents. 

* + ♦ 

What an awakening is in store fur American profiteers 

win' rub their fat paunches complacently and say "prices 
will never again be as low as before the war." 

* * * 

Looks as if there might be some fat legal [lickings in 

the will contest over "Jack" Spreckels' estate. Trust the 
legal talent in San Francisco to make hay when the -uu 
shines. 4, 4, + 

Some Republican newspapers are jubilating that the 

nation's tax-bill is being cut $193,640,000 this fiscal year. 
When the cut is at least four times as big we will all ju- 
bilate. 4. .j. + 

The annual murder record of the United States this 

year will easily beat 15,000. Looks like 20.000. and will 
never be lower, until we take the courts "I justice "tit of 

politics. 4, 4. 4. 

'fhe organized Missionaries declare one-half of Amer- 
ica is nun-religious and needs conversion. All right. Cut 
out all the foreign missions and start on the long neglected 
home field. 4. 4, 4, 

Are all Xed Hamilton'.? political predictions to be as 

goggle-eyed as that about McLaughlin becoming Revenue 
Collector? This is not a banner year for laborites looking 
for political favors. 4. 4. + 

-Congress favors "personal liberty" as expressed 111 



home brew, but shudders at the thought of wholesome beer 
brewed in the correct manner. Thank heaven this spasm 
of moral lunac) can't last long. 



If the teachers of America "are in a bad way" as com- 
plained of, the blame is on the big men who run the busi- 
nes. Americans never fail to pay liberally when they get 
what they want. 4, 4, 4, 

If Governor Stephens can explain to California taxpay- 
ers how our State has increased in population 44 per cent 
and his public expenses about 144 per cent, he should be 
elected for his mathematical talent. 

* ♦ ♦ 

The so-called "Poor Man's Court" in San Francisco is 

a disgrace to State legislation. Our law courts should be 
for all men alike — rich or poor. Anything else is class 
legislation — graft to increase taxes. 

* * * 

The Senate has passed a bill making it possible for the 

President to appoint General Leonard Wood, as Governor 
of the Phillipines. What is needed is a bill to dispense with 
all our governmental interests in the Phillipines. 

* * * 

We all honor General Pershing but is that reason for 

putting it in the papers whenever one of his former aides 
lias a new baby in the family? Might as well include his 
orderly's family increases and his laundress' and his tailor's. 

* * * 

In the coming contest for Governor of California let it 

not be overlooked, that in addition to the frightful govern- 
ment extravagance, there is a deficit of over two-and-a-half 
millions to be met. That alone should damn the State 
machine. 4. 4. 4. 

The State inheritance tax takes over two million dol- 
lars from the thirteen million estate of the late Mrs. 

Fannie Irwin of San Francisco. What profiteth it to make 
vast fortunes and have State taxeaters squander a lot of 
the cash? 4. 4. * 

"fazz navigation" would seem to be the right name for 

the seamanship on the ill-fated steamer Alaska. Full speed 
ahead in the fog and no soundings though close to the 

rocks. Is hanging too g 1 for seamen who drown 41 

passengers? 4. * * 

"Men", said Editor Steed to the women of the San 

Francisco Center at their St. Francis Hotel meeting, "are 
hard to convince, except in terms of commercial consid- 
eration." And he might have added unless they have a lot 
the best of the bargain you can never convince them. 
+ * + 

"We are going ahead with the building work in San 

Francisco on the American plan with nearly 6,000 men at 
work and constantly increasing the force." announces Athol 
McBean, chairman of the Industrial Relations Committee 
of the Chambi imerce. That's -ad news for the 

bunch which has held San Francis< long. "Hurrah 

f.r the open shop — American Plan!" 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 




E/DITORiaiy GOMME 



The murder of the clergyman who 
A Horrifying Record was decoyed to Salada Beach and 
slaughtered, is considered particu- 
larly atrocious. It would be difficult to imagine a more 
hideous crime. 

But in the United States we have a record of 15,000 mur- 
ders a year and rarely is a murderer hung. Often murder- 
ers are lynched, but that too, is reprehensible. The business 
of disposing of murderers belongs to the State. We pay 
judges to attend to it and the duty should be performed in 
a lawful manner. Every slayer should receive a fair and 
open trial in a court of justice, and if convicted should be 
hanged in the manner prescribed by the laws of the State. 

Because of our frighful murder record, and the public 
disrespect of the courts of law, our nation is acquiring for 
itself a reputation which must have an unfortunate effect 
on the character of immigration to America. 

Some years ago, on a journalistic mission, in Europe the 
writer met a provincial English merchant, who had estab- 
lished a dry-goods business in his native town. Considering 
the limited field of his operations, the merchant's success 
was remarkable. He was making money and his towns- 
men were alrady thinking of electing him mayor. The 
writer speaking to him, of the enormous fortunes that had 
been acquired in the dry-goods trade in the United States, 
asked the young merchant if he had ever thought of the 
business opportunities of that new land. 

Yes, he had thought of it, then before he married, and 
children had come to him. 

"But all the money on earth would not get me, now, to 
live in America and bring up my children there," he said. 

# # * 

He did not mean to be offensive in his comments, he 
added, but he had read a great deal about the United States, 
and its records of lawlessness horrified him — the lynchings 
and the thousands of murders that took place every year. 

"The sheriffs rarely hang criminals. That duty seems 
to devolve on the lynchers," declared the merchant. 

He added that, in his own country, there had been only 
two murders in twenty years. One murderer was hanged 
within a month of his crime. The other slayer got away 
to Liverpool and was lost. It was thought he had escaped 
to America. 

These remarks of a young business man of a foreign 
country, are full of significance. Money could not influence 
him to emigrate to America, for as he said, "how could he 
hope to bring up his children safely in a lawless land where 
crime went largely unpunished?" 

* * * 

While men of this young business man's class, look 
askance at our new land and avoid emigration, the unde- 
sirable classes of every large European city are eager to 
cross the Atlantic and cast themselves into the overworked 
"Smelting-pot" of Americanism. Are we receiving more 
than our share of the foreigners that are difficult to convert 
into honest and desirable Americans? We undoubtedly 
have gained in many ways by the labor and blood of mill- 
ions of honest immigrants whose children are a credit to 
our professions and industries. 

But beyond all question, the national repute of having 
the largest murder record and smallest list of hangings, is 
calculated to bring to our shores a dangerous disproportion 
of vicious immigrants. 




The greatest question of all in the United States, is to 
make its law courts efficient and respected. Unless \vt 
begin that vital form we shall go from bad to worse, until 
such atrocities as the murder of Father Heslin will cease to 
horrify us. 

The remedy is to take the courts and judges out of poli- 
itics. That is what the British have done and their learned 
and respected judiciary are the props of government. 
* * * 

The manner in which the press 
The Hightower Scandal is treating the Hightower case is 
calculated to bring American jus- 
tice into disrespect. It is an indication of how little awe 
our courts inspire. 

The press either ignorantly or wilfully ignores the fact 
that it is the duty of the courts and the jury system to 
prosecute murderers, and interference with the formal 
process of trial is contempt of court. Nowhere, but in the 
United States are courts so flouted. English courts which 
the world admits are good, are jealous of their authority. 
Any newspaper undertaking to try murder cases in its 
columns is likely to be punished. An example of the 
jealous care of its authority was given some years ago by 
a Sydney court in a case in which San Francisco had an 
interest. Australian justice follows the English lines. 

An Australian murderer had been decoying miners to 
lonely spots to see new mines, and killing them for their 
money. The villain escaped to San Francisco and the 
Sydney authorities applied for his extradition to Australia. 
Having considerable money taken from his victims the 
murderer made a long technical fight against extradition 
but was at last sent back to Sydney. 

After the murderer's return a leading Sydney news- 
paper published an article on the slowness of justice in 
America and its swiftness in Australia. The murderer 
whose extradition in San Francisco had been delayed so 
long, would be tried and hanged in a month, declared the 
Sydney editor. Next day he was summoned to appear 
before the criminal court for contempt and was fined $500 
for presuming to say what the court would do in the 
coming murder case. The court and jury were fully com- 
petent to deal with the case, the judge said, without sug- 
gestions from the press. In view of the fact that the of- 
fending editor was actuated only by a desire to praise 
Australian justice the punishment would be made lighter 
for him. His fine would be only $500. 
* * * 

Now see what has occurred in the Hightower case. 
Hightower, if the actual murderer of the priest, is as 
callous a rascal as the Australian murderer who decoyed 
miners to their graves. The chief of police stood in with 
the scheme to prevent other newspapers from getting 
wind of the discovery of the priest's body. He allowed 
himself to be locked up in the Examiner office until 4 
a. m.. while all the details of the discovery were being 
printed and prepared for distribution in the Examiner's 
regular morning edition. It is true that an Examiner re- 
porter had found the first clue to the mystery of the priests 
disappearance, but that a chief of police should, on that 
account, have allowed himself and his assistants to be 
drawn into a newspaper scheme to give a publication a 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR AUGUST 27, 1921 



"beat" on its rivals, will appear to people in other lands 
as a very queer form of American methods in the prose 
cution of dangerous criminals. 

* * * 

Ever since the suspected murderer's arrest, he has 
been treated more like a freak in a museum than a man 
charged with an atrocious crime. He has been ceaselessly 
interviewed and photographed, and columns of his denials, 
have been published. He has, virtually been taken out of 
his cell and placed in the show windows of the press for 
the gaping crowd to watch. 

Al! the time the suspect gets further away from the 
legal gallows if guilty. If brought to court trial it will be 
almost impossible to find jurymen who have not read 
about the murder and formed strong opinions. As such 
the jurors will be disqualified. Then, if the case should 
proceed in the usual manner, there will be delays, argu- 
ments, more delays to enable new witnesses to appear. A 
year, perhaps, will pass and in the ever-increasing list of 
murders, the ruthless slaughter of a San Francisco priest 
will have lost interest in the public mind. Why wonder 
when the mob takes matters into its hands and tnakes 
the repute of our democracy for honest justice worse than 
ever? * * * 

The whole thing is outrageously wrong. Murderers 
when arrested should not be made museum exhibits. Their 
place is a prison, and no outsiders should see them but their 
attorneys. Their trial should begin and end in the courts 
of justice and if convicted the malefactors should be dealt 
with promptly. But under our system conviction is only 
a beginning if a murderer can pay for lawyers. 

The Hightower case shows us the depth and breadth of 
the slough into which we have fallen and where we flounder, 
sinking deeper and deeper at every step. Where will it all 
end? One dreads to think what will happen unless we 
take steps to make crime odious and dangerous. What 
avails it to a commonwealth to make millions, when no 
cutthroat can be punished unless he be too poor to hire a 
lawyer? The public may think that crime is preferable to 
decency, as did Hightower, who seems in some way to 
have been associated in an enterprise to promote robbery 
and murder. No community conducted on such lines can 
hold together. Vigilance committees will not improve 
matters. We must establish orderly justice by enforce- 
ment of the laws or abandon civilization. 



Congress is considering means to 
The Hawaiians Doomed save the llawaiians. How fool- 
ish. If people cannot save them- 
selves no foreign government can do it. The white race 
has killed off the Kanakas, as we have killed off the Amer- 
ican Indian. The few and dwindling remnants of both 
races count for little. Fate has signed the warrant of their 
doom. Many races have lost their place in the world by 
their inability to compete in the hard struggle of exist- 
ence. Many others will go before the curtain is rung down 
on humanity. 

To talk. now. of saving the unfortunate Hawaiians is 
sniveling sentimentality. Glance back at the pages of recent 
history and see what the white man has done to the Kanaka. 
Xot so many years ago we kidnapped natives t.4 South Sea 
islands and put them to work on Hawaiian sugar planta- 
tions, because tin' native Hawaiian had no stomach for 
hard work to make planters rich. "Blackhirding" we called 
that form of slavery, in which holy deacons of Boston 
participated, as they did in stealing Africans from their 
native homes and selling them to American cotton planters. 

The Polynesian natives we stole and enslaved on Hawaii- 
an sugar plantations were, industrially, no better than the 



Kanakas. So we enticed Portuguese to till the sugar plan- 
tations, They were a failure, for various reasons, and final- 
ly we imported Japanese workers who have virtually taken 
possession of the islands, since the Chinese have been shut 
out, to please the labor agitators in the United States. Now, 
the Japanese are sending as envoys to Congress, white 
delegates of labor unions, to oppose any legislation against 
the Mikado's hardy and industrious subjects in the Sand- 
wich Islands. 

Yes! The poor Kanaka, with his easy ways is doomed, 
and we have helped to make his unfitness for the fierce 
struggle of life more disastrous to him. Let us not snivel 
over our work of destruction and strew the grave of Ha- 
waiian civilization with faded posies of hypocrisy. 

Let us look to ourselves. Observe the rapid invasion of 
the United States by many foreign races that are rele- 
gating the Anglo-Saxon to subordinate places in commerce, 
trade, and agriculture. Eliminate foreign labor from the 
orchards of the Pacific Coast and what remains? Ask the 
white owners who prefer to let their fruit ripen and rot, 
rather than lose more money by trying to save, gather, and 
market it. 

The reformers are be- 
New Worry For The Reformers coming very angry over 

the betting on horse- 
races which is worked at in the Eastern states. 

Ostensibly betting on the races has bi en stopped, but in 
reality the bookmakers are busy as ever. Dr Young, 
president of the Society for the Prevention of Crime has 
complained to Mayor Hylan of New York. 

"The law is clear," Dr. Young said, "and the law-abiding 
people of this community will not tolerate this open defi- 
ance of the law. The boldness of betting, the number of 
the bettors, and the sums staked are simply staggering. 
The throngs present at the race tracks give little attention 
to the races themselves, they are intent only upon the 
wagering." 

"Twice I have attended races." said Dr. Young, "and have 
noted carefully the bookmaking and the paying of bets, and 
have returned on one of the trains that carry chiefly the 
losers. These are the most dejected and desperate lot I 
ever saw. Think what their home-coming means to their 
families and their employers' tills. I am informed that 
when employees of banks and other concerns arc found 
stealing to recoup their losses at the races the directors 
make good the peculations rather than let the public know 
their institutions employ race track habitues — for so thor- 
oughly does the public believe that gambling disintegrates 
character and that the losing gambler often steals, some- 
times robs, and occasionally murders. 

"The most sickening sight at the race tracks is the 
gambling women, their faces hard and set and with nearly 
every trace of femininity gone. It is of no use to adopt 
mild measures with the bookmakers who live and flourish 
on the proceeds of common dishonest}', but their arrest and 
prosecution may reveal the persons higher up who pro- 
tect them. 

"What I propose, then, is a long, hard fight beset with 
many difficulties. But we have able advisors, dependable 
evidence getters and public spirited citizens who will stay 
to the end. May I not ask for the undertaking, the sym- 
pathy and co-operation of all good citizens?" 

Between bootleggers, bookmakers and cigarette smokers 
the professional reformers have a terrible time. Satan is 
tier headed off in one direction than he is playing the 
devil with sinners in another. 

While we are worrying ourselves into early graves over 
the moral lapses of our fellow-citizens the stolid Britishers 
and mercurial Frenchmen are getting all they can out of 
life. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 




'One (hdlwil/pkjr Ik daj/.sir. v& jm 



Seek Home News Elsewhere. 

The Oakland Tribune — an excellent newspaper — would 
be even more so, if it published as many inside facts about 
the Alameda ring, as it does about San Francisco, prints an 
interesting statement about J. J. Tynan, the San Francisco 
shipbuilder coming to the aid of Mayor Jim Rolph. Most 
people knew though the local newspapers did not refer to 
it, that the Mayor's ship-building plant at Eureka was not a 
success. Now, according to the daily Tribune, Mr. Tynan 
has joined hands with San Francisco's chief magistrate to 
make the latter's financial affairs flow smoothly onward. 
Everybody hopes so. Though Mayor Rolph's administra- 
tion has been lamentable for the taxpayers, no one wishes 
to see his financial affairs entangled. That J. J. Tynan 
should unite with the mayor in money-making, sounds like 
an airy romance. San Francisco business men know that 
Mr. Tynan most earnestly advised the Mayor not to start ■ 
his Eureka ship-yard which proved so unprofitable. 
* # * * * 

The Ship-building Hysteria 

Unfortunately for his purse, Mayor Rolph had apparent- 
ly reached the conclusion that he was one of fate's favored 
sons, when he went into ship-building. Favorable winds 
had filled his sails for years. No doubt he thought Fortune 
would ever be loyal to him. He seemed to be still on the 
flood tide of prosperity when the Eureka ship-yard project 
attracted him. 

Everybody remembers it all. How joyously Mayor 
Rolph embarked in the construction scheme. It was a glad 
day in Eureka when the ship-yard was opened under loyal 
union terms, and all the notable orators of the Closed Shop 
flung verbal bouquets at the popular Mayor of San Francis- 
co. Predictions of the manifold increase of his millions 
were voiced, and most people believed that there never 
could be a different future for the Eureka ship-yard than 
continuous prosperity. 

T ¥ T T T 

Graveyards of Financial Hopes 

But ship-yards have become the graveyards of financial 
hopes for many captains of industry. The flood-tide of 
prosperity has run out and left unused and useless ships to 
rot on the mud-banks. The world has never seen anything 
like it. In America we do many things, hysterically, and 
never was lack of foresight more characteristic than in 
building our merchant marine to capture the commerce of 
the world. It never seemed to occur to us that demagogues 
had tied weights to our merchant ships by foolish laws that 
made competition with foreigners impossible for most 
American shipowners. Ships we might build in great num- 
bers, but cargoes we could not secure unless in the face of 
severe competition with rivals who could underbid us. So 
new ships are swinging at anchor, idle in every port, and 
the sounds of industry have ceased in the boom ship-yards. 
Overpaid shipbuilders are not riding to their daily toil in 
fine motor cars. Most of the unlucky men are pawning 
their watches, or are away amongst the orchards, picking 
fruit. The Eureka shipyard, which J. J. Tynan advised his 
friend Mayor Rolph not to start is like many more, closed 
for an indefinite period. The optimistic mayor has learned 
that great enterprises may prove costly failures as well as 



great money makers. The Oakland Tribune declares that 
Mayor Rolph is going into the retail coal business to recoup 
his fortunes and his coal company will cross swords with 
San Francisco leaders in that line of business. The ad- 
vantages to a retail coal company with the Mayor at its 
head are suggested by our enterprising Oakland contem- 
porary. That line of thought opens up a new angle for the 
taxpayers. Mayors of San Francisco have become the 
dictators and political bosses of the city, as was intended 
when the Charter was forced to adoption by Mayor Phelan. 

Harbinger of Troubles 

It was one of Mayor Phelan's regrets that under the old 
Consolidation Act, prepared by Horace Hawes, a wealthy 
and shrewd taxpayer of San Francisco, a mayor possessed 
limited powers. His political patronage was small. His 
pay was small. The Consolidation Act was designed to pro- 
tect the taxpayers and did so. Taxes were little over a 
dollar on the hundred. Houses were abundant and rents 
were low. All that was contrary to the ideas of Mayor 
Phelan and his "progressive" policy, which Hearst aggres- 
sively agitated. The Charter was adopted and the Mayor 
of San Francisco became almost an autocrat. He was in- 
vested with power to meddle in every municipal department 
and his salary was raised. "Larger pay will attract bigger 
men", declared Mr. Phelan. The first mayor to be attracted 
by the bigger pay and bigger powers was put in jail. His 
attorney grafted in every possible way and became wealthy. 
The city was scandalized and a reign of extravagance 
began which still is in full swing, and growing worse. Taxes 
were increased about 400 per cent. Under the Consolidation 
Act the municipality cost about six millions. Now its cost 
is nearer to twenty-five millions. We had no municipal 
debt. Now we are overwhelmed with debt. We owe for 
everything — even the bricks in our City Hall. Mortgages 
are plastered all over our unlucky city. We owe for 
municipal car-lines that do not pay. We owe a large sum 
for Hetch Hetchy which has absorbed all the millions we 
voted to acquire a water supply. We owe for our school- 
houses. We owe for our hospitals. All this we can charge 
to the Charter which Mayor Phelan said was to make the 
most fortunate city on earth. If being in debt and loaded 
with interest makes public happiness the Phelan Charter 
has made San Francisco a perfect paradise. Many sensible 
and public spirited citizens believe that next to the Open 
Shop the vital need of San Francisco is abolition of our 
Charter and sweeping out of all the costly excrescences 
that have come into being under it. 

$ s|: $ ♦ # 

Lost Favor With Navy 

The transfer of the Naval Training Station from San 
Francisco to San Diego is a cause of regret for it deprives 
our city of a source of business. It is not easy to obtain 
those political advantages and they are not easy to keep. 
Rival localities are always trying to steal them. San Fran- 
cisco, however, has had her share of political favors. 

One town which lost favor with the Navy is Santa 
Cruz. It is not likely that warships will anchor off Santa 
Cruz on a national holiday very soon unless the city does 
something to atone for the discourtesy shown on the last 
fourth of July celebration. Comments are occuring in East- 
ern publications. Sailors and officers must have written 
home about the affair and in that way the matter got into 
print in the Eastern newspapers. Now friends in Eastern 
States are writing to friends in Santa Cruz and there is 
general inquiry as to whom should be blamed for the 
boorish treatment of Naval officers at the fourth of July 
celebration. By the courtesy of the Admiral several war 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR AUGUST 27, 1921 

vessels wore assigned to anchorage off Santa Cruz. The 
original intention had been to anchor the fleet off Monterey, 
but some influential private citizens had the plans modified 
and four vessels cast anchor oft' Santa Cruz, A procession 
of sailors and marines was announced, and visitors went 
in great numbers to the picturesque seaside resort. 

When the hour for the procession was approaching no 
municipal acknowledgment of the visiting warships had 
been received. The Mayor of the city and a committee of 
his wise and patriotic Council was of course expected. 
Usually, visiting warships no sooner anchor off a friendly 
city than civic delegations arrive to pay their respects. 
The municipal officials come to express their welcome and 
confer with the Admiral about the length of his stay and 
the social program to be observed. Invitations to banquets, 
balls, etc., etc., are tendered the naval visitors and they are 
made to feel that their arrival is regarded as a public event. 
Not so at Santa Cruz on the Glorious Fourth, it is said. If 
a brick scow from San Francisco had tied up at the munic- 
ipal wharf there could not have been less official foresight 
and courtesy. One can only guess what the commander of 
the squadron and his officers thought of the extraordinary 
display of discourtesy. No Mayor or Councilmen stepped 
aboard the flagship to tender the visitors an official or any 
other kind of welcome. Had the sailors cast anchor off the 
island of Yap, they could not have been more uncivilly 
neglected. The result w&s shown in the street procession, 
when the sailors and marines marched as if they were at 
a funeral. Only once did they exhibit any interest.. "Hur- 
rah for Santa Cruz" ! shouted some patrioticc citizens on 
the sidewalk. "Oh, raspberry!" groaned the sailors and 
trudged on. There were no motor cars for the naval officers' 
transportation around the city and those who desired to 
see it, were left to pay their dimes on the street cars. It 
was one of the occasions that Santa Cruz would wish to 
forget, declare indignant citizens who are now commenting 
on the uncomplimentary accounts appearing in Eastern 
newspaper clippings. Municipally, Santa Cruz and San 
Francisco do not seem to be far apart in the matter of fail- 
ure to impress the observant public. 



Woodrow Wilson with all his liun- 
Claim Collection Graft ger for money and power is on the 

verge of more trouble. It is in- 
tended in Washington to enforce the law against former 
office holders practising as claims attorneys. Wilson is 
now law partner of Brainbridgc Colby. Present claims 
against the Government amount to over a billion dollars. 
Woodrow and his law partner expect to get a good share of 
the billion. By a law of 1873 it is unlawful for any former 
official of the United State- to act as attorney or agent. 
to collect claims against the Government that were pending 
when he was in office. It is proposed to put teeth in that 
law. I>\ adopting the Kdmondson bill which would punish 
violations by a fine of $10,000 or two years imprisonment 
or both. 

It is claimed that ex-officials have the inside track in 
claim collection and should be shut out to prevent graft. 



There is activity in the realt\ 
Realty Is Not Active Yet market say the newspapers 

Yes! But at what prices? 
Market Street lots that were salable twenty years ag 
$2000 a front foot noarYan Xess Ave., cannot lie sold now at 
$1000 a foot. Property on Ninth street, two blocks from 
Market street, is selling for $125 per front foot. Twenty 
years ago it sold for SSlXt a foot. The Closed Shop and the 
Phelan Charter have demoralized San Francisco realty. 
Both handicaps will have to be removed to enable San Fran- 
cisco to reach her proper growth. 



HOUSEWIVES! 

Cut Your Food Costs in Two 

Buy now nt 

Farmers' 
Public Market 

Tenth and Market Streets 

Sale Every Day from 6 A. M. to 7 P. M. 

All Fruits and Vegetables 

Direct from Farms 

to You 

At Unheard of Prices— Our Own Delivery 

Beware of Fake Free Markets! 

Come to the Original 



FARMERS' PUBLIC MARKET 

Tenth and Market Streets 
GEORGE L. RICCOMI, Manager 




^he treasured 
secret of coffee - 
roas t ind- produce* 
tiie wonarous flavor 

(Swell's 

^^-^ NAIIONAI CREST 

(offee 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



California's Vital Need 

By ARTHUR M. JOHNSON 



IT would seem that Los Angeles, which aims to become 
the victorious competitor of San Francisco will prove 
to be the most powerful influence in causing Northern 
California to attain her proper development and prosperity. 
We tolerated the Closed Shop in San Francisco until our 
building industry became atrophied. Then of a sudden, we 
turned our eyes toward Los Angeles and saw that building 
was in a state of continuous activity in the Southern city. 
The example of Los Angeles in the establishment of the 
Open Shop has caused our business men to co-operate as 
never before for industrial freedom. The Open Shop in San 
Francisco is an established fact and will remain such and 
become more important and powerful in the upbuilding of 
California's world-famous seaport. 

The effort of Los Angeles, to seize many sources of hy- 
dro-electric power was begun with a view to monopolize 
industrial activity in California. Having filed on various 
important sources, Los Angeles hopes to be in a position 
to subsidize factories of all kinds, by offers of electric pow- 
no other city could match. That bold attempt to profit at 
the expense of the remainder of our State, is sure to have 
the effect of arousing Northern California to energetic de- 
velopment of her hydo-electric power sources. 
* * * 

"The extent to which California can develop industrially 
with adequate water power is almost without limit," de- 
clares Wigginton E. Creed, President of the Pacific Gas 
and Electric Company. 

Californa has, in the last ten years made a great gain in 
population. In addition our State possesses most of the 
basic raw materials necessary for manufacture. The third 
thing needed by California for unrestricted industrial de- 
velopment is power. 

The question naturally occurs, whether the State of Cal- 
ifornia, having the great advantage of population and raw 
materials, is in a position to develop the necessary hydro- 
electric power. On that point the opinion of Mr. Creed is 
valuable. He says : 

"There is no question at all that favorable physical con- 
ditions exist. What is most needed is the co-operation of 
the public and an understanding by the public of what the 
development means in order that it may be stimulated and 
encouraged. 

"Careful studies indicate that there is possible of devel- 



Without Good Eyesight *™? s fi^ff* 

POOR MEMORY, Headache, 
Dizziness, Weak. Inflamed, 
Smarting. Sensitive or Gluey 
Eyes, Floating Spots, Crusty or 
Granulated Eyelids, Astigma- 
tism, Watery Eyes or Inability 
to see objects clearly — and 
many other ailments can be 
directly or indirectly attributed 
to EVE-STRAIN. 
■*S~To relieve these ailments you 
must remove the cause. 

When yr>ur eyes need atten- 
tion lie sure you consult Oenrge 
the noted Eyesight Specialist, 960 Market sired who 
uses only the latest and must scientific Instruments in the examina- 
tion of children's eyes and complicated mses of eye defects His 
new and exclusive methods and 27 years of practical experience In 
San Francisco are great factors to his wonderful success. 
Mayerle's Eyewater is a marvelous Eye Tonic for children and 
adults and can be had at all druggists 55c, or sent by mail 70c. 

Remember the Number: 960 Market Street, San Francisco 

Between Mason and Taylor 




Mayerle, 



opment in bydro-electric power in California 9.250,000 
horse-power, of which only 942,000 horse power (a little 
over ten per cent) is thus far developed. The potentiality 
of the State for power development is relatively strong. 
The total maximum horse power in water in the whole 
United States is 59,369,000 and in the 11 Western States is 
42,850,000. California thus possesses, about 15 per cent of 
the total possible hydro-electric development in the entire 
country, and about 23 per cent of the possible hydro-electric 
development in the West. 

"The power companies of the State are not unmindful of 
the need for power. The combined construction programs 
uf all the California power companies contemplate the de- 
velopment of about 2.000.000 horse power in the next ten 
years. The development if carried out, will require an ex- 
penditure of $500,000,000 to $800,000,000 during the period 
of construction. Probably $600,000,000 is a close estimate 
of the amount of new money required. 

"Will this amount of power be necessary? If growth 
continues in the future at the same rate it has in the past, 
the State will require about 100.000 horse power additional 
each year. If, in addition to taking care of the normal 
growth and development based upon the rate of progress 
in the past, the water power companies are to relieve the 
oil industry of some of its burdens in order to reduce the 
cost of power and preserve for other uses the oil supply for 
which there is no substitute, then the additional amount of 
power required will be greater than 100,000 horse power 
per annum. At present the users of hydro-electric power 
are distributed about as follows: Lighting, 13.6 per cent; 
commercial and industrial power, 45.7 per cent; agricult- 
ural, 12.9 per cent; railway power, 27.8 per cent. 

"Increased demands", Mr. Creed says, will come from: 

(a) Normal increase in the needs of present users. 

(b) The substitution of water power for oil in many 
branches of industry. 

( e ) New industries. 

(d) New uses for power. 

* * * 
"Aside from the demand for water power to displace 
oil, the greatest use of the future." Mr. treed foresees "will 
probably come from the agricultural industry. The best 
available data indicate that there are 22.000,000 acres of 
cultivable land in the State out of a total of 101.800,000 
acres. Of the 22.000,000 acres suitable for cultivation, 
approximately 4,000.000 acres are under cultivation, in- 
cluding all the irrigated lands. At present there is installed 
for irrigation purposes in the State, a capacity of about 
275,000 horse power. If in the next ten years, as a reflex 
of the industrial growth of the State, the entire 22,000,000 
acres of land be put under irrigation, the power installation 
required will probably equal about five times the present 
capacity installed for irrigation purposes. 

"The whole State should be animated by a spirit of 
co-operation toward water power development. The des- 
tiny of California as an industrial empire will be hastened 
or delayed as its people encourage or discourage the in- 
vitation to capital to support projects to harness the 
mountain waters. In truth, the future of California will 
be measured in terms of horse power from hydro-electric 
development." 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR AUGUST 27, 1921 



Movie Censors Absurd 

By JAMES L. RANSOME 



AS this is the period when strenuous moral reforma- 
tion is the most absorbing occupation of the virtu- 
ous, it was to have been expected the motion pictures 
would be put upon the rack. Various states have appointed 
boards of censors, who are over-paid and under-educated, 
to purify the screen drama. The results are what might 
have been expected. Many of the uncensored pictures were 
bad, but not a few were good. Under the influence of 
censors who are either ignorant politicians or meddlesome 
cranks the screen drama promises to be more ridiculous 
than vicious. If the censors do not kill it, the producers 
will be surprised. 

The mind of the censor is an interesting study. Like 
Bret Harte's "Heathen Chinee," he has "ways that are dark 
and tricks that are vain." In different sections there is a 
wide variance on the things considered censorable. Chica- 
go has an aversion to any incident which smacks of crime, 
and the moving pictures makers say that is because so 
man)' crimes are committed there. This remark gains point 
when it is known that the police constitute the board of 
censors. 

In a recent serial brought out by the Pathe organization, 
there was a scene where the villain and his trusty men cut 
down a tree, making it fall across the road, in order to 
intercept an approaching automobile. But the police step- 
ped in and said it must not be. 

They said that this scene was instruction in crime, the 
very thing the board most strongly opposed. The producer 
replied that the cutting down of a tree and blocking a road 



was scarcely a crime. Then the police went into details, 
explaining that in the Inst place the villain and his band 
had trespassed on private property when they left the road 
to enter the woods. The tree did not belong to them and 
they had no right to cut it down. In addition, it was a 
breach of the peace to block the road, with possible injury 
to autoists. Finally, if the villain wanted that car stopped, 
he should apply to the Sheriff or some constituted officer 
of the law and have it done by due process. 

Illustrations of this sort are almost endless. In another 
picture one character demanded of a girl her unqualified 
friendship, and the censors wanted to know what that 
meant. In 'The Faith Healer' it was necessary to take out 
a scene which showed the stoning of the healer. The cen- 
sors held that that incident might be taken as a reflection 
upon religion. 

There have been so many odd objections that even the 
most unusual are becoming commonplace. In a western 
film a producer had to eliminate a scene where a group of 
cowboys watched a girl getting aboard a train because her 
dress was short. It would not be necessary to go West for 
real scenes of this kind, but the censors wouldn't have it 
that way. Practically all censors agree that the villain must 
not pick the pocket of the victim, rifle his luggage or oth- 
erwise commit a crime in the view of all. But should the 
heroine wish to get a key in the pocket of the capitalist 
who holds a mortgage on her father's farm, that is all right, 
because it is going to be proved that the capitalist did not 
really have a right to the mortgage. 

In Chicago and Ohio the opposition against showing 
crimes of any kind is emphasized. In Pennslyvania the 
subject of birth is strongly condemned by the censors. 
Kissing is unpopular with censors both in Pennsylvania and 
Baltimore. Kansas is against all of these things. 



Pioneers in Power Production 



Standing like sentinels on/either side of Carquincz Straits, the water gateway to the great in- 
terior valley of California, are tWO lofty steel t" 

Suspended between them are six steel cables which clear tin- tallest masts of passing ships. 

This is the famous overhead cable crossing of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company's high 
voltage power lines from its mountain hydro-electric plants to the hay region. 

For upwards of twenty years electricity has been coursing through those - steel night 

ami .lay without a moment's interruption of service. 

In 1900, when the hundred ami forty mile transmission line from Colgate power-house to Oak- 
land was in pro construction, its builders had the choice of a long detour through the 
submerged lands and water-ways of the delta region or the short-cut by means of this unpre- 
cedented engineering feat. 

The sherter way was chosen in spite of the difficulty it presented ami another record 
established by this pioneer power organization in what was. until quite recently, the Ion 
span of aerial cable for electric transmission in the world. 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company 



10 



4/tomobih 




Finer Points of Driving 

It is the custom of a good many au- 
tomobile drivers when going down a 
slight hill to throw the clutch out and 
hold it out, thus letting the car coast 
down the hill disconnected from the 
engine. In many cars this is a harm- 
ful practice because the thrust collar, 
which disengages the clutch, has not 
been designed for this kind of usage. 
It is liable to become dry and squeaky 
or to wear out rapidly if used in this 
way. 

When the car is standing still and 
the clutch is disengaged, the clutch 
ceases to revolve, and there is no wear 
cm the bearing. This is true whether 
the gears are in mesh or not. When, 
however, the car is moving and "in 
gear" the clutch is being driven by the 
rear wheels and a considerable force 
on the clutch thrust collar, or yoke, 
is necessary to hold the clutch out of 
engagement, which places a high initial 
pressure on the bearing. 

When coasting down a long and very 
steep hill it is possibly desirable to 
keep the car in gear and to somewhat 
relieve the brakes' duty by closing the 
throttle of engine and letting this drag 
help to hold back the car. It is often 
pleasurable, however, when going 
down a long staright hill to allow the 
car to coast without the engine. The 
utter absence of noise attained in this 
way is quite delightful. There is one 
proper way to do this. The gear 
shift lever should be thrown into the 
neutral position. The engine may be 
throttled down or switched off entire- 
ly. When nearly at the bottom of the 
hill the motor should be started and 
accelerated by opening the throttle, 
then without touching the clutch the 
gear shift lever can be gently slipped 
into high gear without any perceptible- 
jar or noise. This is a little refinement 
in driving worth mastering which is 
probably not known to twenty per 
cent of the drivers on the road. 



Keep Tires Inflated. 

It is only natural that a car should 
ride more smoothly with soft tires 
than when they arc pumped up hard. 
However, if the tires are inflated lie- 
low factory recommendation, the dif- 
ferent layers of fabric which are vul- 
canized together work loose and, of 
course, weaken ; eventually the weak- 
est point blows out. Purchase a tire 
pressure guage, which indicates the 
amount of air pressure in a tire. 



When the Engine Knocks. 

When an engine knocks something 
is wrong. Whenever there is a rattle 
something is loose that ought to be 
tightened. It takes quite a little skill 
tn locate the different kind of knocks, 
but practice makes perfect. By going 
over the engine carefully these may be 
eliminated one by one. 

Spark knock is due to spark being 
advanced too far, particularly when go- 
ing up a hill. The engine slows down 
and the explosion comes before dead 
center, causing a knock. If spark is 
retarded the knock disappears. 

Overheating causes a knock by firing 
the gas before the piston reaches up- 
per dead center on the compression 
stroke. The exploding gas expanding 
meets the piston going up and makes 
a knock. Overheating may be noted 
by steam at radiator. 

Carbon knock is caused by red-hot 
carbon in cylinder head setting 
fire to the mixture when the gas has 
been compressed to a certain point. 
Remove a spark plug and look in cylin- 
ders for presence of carbon. 

The last classification is a large one 
as it includes wear or looseness of all 
moving parts of the engine. The prin- 
cipal knocks are main bearing, connec- 
ting rod. wrist pin. piston slap, loose 
fly-wheel, etc. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 



Care of Brakes 

The lining material should be kept 
in good condition, and it is not in that 
state if allowed to become hard and 
glossy. Whenever you hear screeching 
brakes, make up your mind those 
brakes need attention, and unless they 
have it an accident may be the result. 

Once in two months the rear wheels 
ought to be removed entirely so the 
brake bands may be washed off thor- 
oughly with kerosene to remove accu- 
mulated oil and grit. It is best to jack 
up the rear axle and have both wheels 
off at once. Then, while the bands of 
one are being given their first applica- 
tion of kerosene, those on the other 
side are soaking and the kerosene is 
rating into and softening the grease. 
At the same time the pores of the lin- 
ing material are being opened and the 
liber of the material is swelling. 

A few moments after the kerosene 
has pretty well disappeared, apply or- 
dinary lubricating oil, seeing that it is 
thoroughly smeared all over and is per- 
mitted to remain until the material 
absorbs it. This process, as a matter 
of fact, should be performed at night, 
when the car is not to be used, for then 
the oil will have a chance to get well 
into the fabric and thereby will keep 
it from absorbing water and grit. At 
the same time it will keep the material 
expanded that much longer. 

After the surplus oil. if any, has been 
wiped off. and the wheels replaced, the 
owner will be astonished at the way 
tin- brakes will take hold and what 
slight pressure of the foot is needed to 
make them perform. 

An application of oil once a week 
will keep the brakes in condition, and 
this is only a few minutes work. 



Carrying Extra Tubes and Tires 

Extra tubes should be folded and 
wrapped in cloth or put in a cloth bag. 
If left in the original cartons or thn >w n 
loosely under the seat they will chafe 
at points of contact. Never put them 
in the tool box or where they will come 
in contact with chains, took or grease. 

Spare cases should be provided with 
covers. The wind and sun dry them 
out and dampness getting inside rots 
the fabric. Interchange your tires oc- 
casionally, for rubber deteriorates fas- 
ter out of use than in. Remember it 
no economy to carry retreaded or re- 
paired cases as extras. Having been 
through a second heat of vulcaniza- 
tion they are liable to more rapid de- 
terioration than new cases, but if put 
in service immediately, you will get 
full service out of them before this can 
have much effect. 



Clean Ball Check Valves in Oil Pump. 

The ball check valves which control 
the movement of oil through the pump 
where pressure feed lubrication is ad- 
hered to, should be cleaned occasion- 
ally to insure proper working. 



Adjustment of Vibrators. 

The vibrators of coils should be ad- 
justed according to their individual 
peculiarities and the motor. On some 
engines a slight variation of the ad- 
justment will change materially the 
operation of the motor. The amount 
of current consumed by coil depends 
upon the adjustment, and it can be 
made to take three amperes. Gener- 
ally the coil should not draw over half 
an ampere, and increasing the con- 
sumption over that required for proper 
operation does not increase the effici- 
ency of the motor. The quality of the 
spark and its length depends upon the 
number of cells employed, method of 
wiring and connecting with the coil. 
The average coil will operate efficient- 
ly on half an ampere. 



Battery Terminals 

I he positive and negative terminals 
oi a battery can lie found by means of 
a glass of water. The water should 
have some salt or electrolyte in it M 
make it a better conductor. The wires 
are placed in the solution, being care- 
ful not tf> let the ends touch. Hydrogen 
bubbles will form on the negative wire. 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR AUGUST 27, 1921 



11 



Horses of Famous Generals 



The horse upon which "Little Phil" 
Sheridan rode, in his famous ride from 
Winchester to Cedar Creek, was a 
black charger named "Rienzi." The 
Ik use' has shared with his master the 
fame and glory of that day in Buch- 
anan Read's beautiful poem, which has 
made the ride immortal. 

In the battle of Antietam, General 
McClellan rode a large black horse, 
which he called "Daniel Webster." 
The General's staff had much difficulty 
in keeping apace with him, and usually 
spoke of the horse in unflattering 
terms. The general, however, was 
very much attached to him. 

General Ambrose E. Burnside al- 
ways rode a horse called "Major." 
Like the general. "Major" came 
through the war safely, and outlived 
his master. After Burnside's death, 
the horse was shot at Edgehill, and it 
was claimed for him that he was 30 
years old. 

When the Union forces were pur- 
suing the Confederates, after the lat- 
ter's evacuation of Petersburg and 
Richmond, General Meade was ill of 
a fever, but could not be persuaded to 
enter an ambulance, and rode his favor- 
ite horse, "Baldy." 

There was a very vicious horse call- 
ed "Hannibal" given to the West Vir- 
ginia army, but the general forbade 
any of his officers to ride him. as he 
claimed to do so would be to risk their 
lives. A Captain Egan, of a company 
of volunteers, asked to be allowed to 
have the horse, and break him. The 
general handed him over to Egan with 
the assurance that he would break his 
neck. "Hannibal" became entirely 
tractable, and once saved the captain's 
neck, when Egan was pursued by guer- 
rillas in the mountains of West Vir- 
ginia, Horse and rider soon became 
very much attached to each other. 

The horse upon which General Kear- 
ney rode when he was shot at Chantilly 
was forwarded with his sword by Gen- 
eral Lee, showing the kimlK courtesy 
which always characterized the con- 
federate -leader. 

General Rushing of New Jersey rode 
a large grej horse, and "Fighting Joe" 

I looker rode a pure white Steed, mak- 
ing him conspicuous as he galloped 
from one part of the battlefield to the 
other. 

General Thomas I. (Stonewall I 
Jackson's favorite horse was "Little 
Sorrel." upon which he was riding 
when he received his death wound. 
He had always been very much attach- 
ed to her. and she it was who followed 
his funeral cortege, bearing an empty 
Saddle, In appearance she was as raw- 
boned and ungainly a^ her master. 

General Ewell usually rod. 
looking grey named "Rifles". No doubt 
he gave him that name in memory of 



the old company of Rifles in which 
Ewell served during the Mexican war. 

General Lee's "Traveler" was a hand- 
some iron grey. 

General Turner Ashby had three 
horses shot beneath him upon the same 
day that he fell at Port Republic. lie 
was dismounted when shot. The first 
horse he lost that day was his favor- 
ite, which he called "Black Conrad." 
When the horse was mortally wounded, 
Ashby kissed him between the eyes, 
and drawing his revolver, ended his 
sufferings. The horse that crossed the 
mountain, in the general's funeral cor- 
tege, was one he occasionally rode. 

The horse which General Albert Sid- 
ney Johnston rode when mortally 
wounded at Shiloh was a thoroughbred 
named "Fire-Eater." The two were 
shot at the same time, and neither 
flinched. It was only after a staff 
officer noticed Johnston's growing 
paleness that the general was lifted 
from the horse, and the gallant steed 
then sank to the ground without a 
moan. 

— By A. Genevieve Dyer, 

In "Our Dumb Animals." 



San Francisco Law School 

Third Floor, Call Building 

EVENING SESSION FOR MEN 
AND WOMEN 

The importance of the study of law 
in the young man and woman of today 
cannot be overstated. And tile oppor- 
tunity to secure a thorough legal edu- 
cation is easily within their reach hen 
in San Francisco. 

Write or call TODAY for catalogue, 

The Secretary will be at the office "I 

the School every evening. 6:45 to 7:45. 

(except Saturdays and holidays), or 

any time by appointment. 

Telephone Kearny 4251 



She 



-I want some powder. 
e: — Yes, missis; tooth, face or flea 
powder? — Tatler. 



FOR SALE 
40 H. P. Roadster 

( Late Model) 

Perfect Mechanical Condition 
Throughout 

Special Top, New Tires and Extra 
Equipment 

BARGA1N^$700 



Box 20-S. F. NEWS LETTER 

382 Russ Building. Fan Franciico 




Cleaner Complete 

A Perfect Cleaner for Automobiles 

Efficient — Economical 



VAN AUTO VACUUM CLEANER 

AND GAS SAVER 

Please Note the Following Features: 

1 — Keepa the ear clean and sanitary. 
2— Saves tfl 

:; Cleans the engine by running Kerosene through 
I he Vacuum Into the motor. 

I I'linns dirt ami dust nut <>f the outside casing 

in changing tires. 

tdjustment of ^ ir pressure easy at any 
altitude. 

FOR SALE BY ALL DEALERS 

Price Complete $15.00. Installed $1 7.50 

Manufactured By 

VAN AUTO VACUUM COMPANY 

135 Hyde Street, San Francisco, Calif. 
Phone Prospect 132 



^att Sranrisro (ftbrmttrb? 



Leading Newspaper of the Pacific Coast 



A Newspaper made every day 

TO SPEAK TO 

Every member of every family 

Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for $1.15 a month- 
including Sunday editions 
Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postmaster 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 




ociot 




Weddings 

THE marriage of Miss Anna Van 
Winkle and Dr. Kenneth Dole of 
Redlands took place at high noon 
Saturday at the home of the brides' pa- 
rents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Livingston Van 
Winkle in Clay street. 

It was a small wedding with only forty 
atives and family connections there. Mrs. 
John Jacob Smith, who was Miss Evelyn 
Van Winkle, was her sister's matron of 
honor and Miss Carolyn Knowles was the 
maid of honor. Mr. Norman Dole was his 
brother's best man. 

After a wedding trip, the couple will go 
to Redlands to live. 

The Van Winkle family is an old one 
here and Dr. Dole comes from the well- 
known Honolulu family. His uncle was the 
first governor of Hawaii. 

The wedding of Miss Ruby Hale and 

Oliver Field, which took place at the lovely 
Reuben B. Hale country place in Ross, 
Monday afternoon, was one of the most 
beautiful affairs of the late summer. Miss 
Hale is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Reu- 
ben B. Hale, the former of whom gave his 
daughter in marriage. 

The wedding of Miss Sara d'Ancona, 

daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Daw- 
son d'Ancona, and Grant James Hunt took 
place Tuesday evening at St. Luke's Episco- 
pal Church, Dean J. Wilmer Gresham per- 
formed the ceremony, which was followed 
by a small reception at the d'Ancona home 
on Divisadero street. 

Miss Vesta Buck, daughter of Mr. 

and Mrs. C. A. Buck of Burlingame, be- 
came the bride of Milton S. Theller of 
Sacramento on Saturday. The ceremony 
was performed at the First Methodist 
Church in Oakland by Rev. E. R. Dille. 

After a wedding luncheon at the Hotel 
Oakland, the bridal couple left on a wed- 




139-153 GEAHY ST. 

^J rnar>1:JLpparel 

to n UUom en 

and Vjjss^S 

St\jl<3 arvcl Quality 
witkout Extravagance 




ding trip. They will tour Southern Cali- 
fornia on their honeymoon and upon their 
return will make their home in Sacramento. 

Dr. Jesse P. Juhl and Mrs. Ethel 

Seal were married at Los Gatos on Friday, 
August 19th, and are touring south on 
their honeymoon. 

Luncheons 
Mrs. John Henry Russell, of Los 



Angeles, who is visiting her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Mark Requa, in Piedmont, gave 
a luncheon Monday for Miss Lorna Wil- 
liamson, who will soon be married to Mr. 
Andrew Talbot, and Mrs. Salem Pohlman, 
who was Miss Sally Long, a bride of a few 
weeks ago 

Mrs. Alexander Garceau was among 

the hostesses at luncheon at the St. Francis 
on Monday. In her party were Mrs. Geo. 
Lent, Miss Jennie Hooker, Mrs. Harry 
Bates and Miss Ethel Cooper. 

Mr. and Mrs. Willard Chamberlain 

will give a luncheon Sunday at the Bur- 
lingame Country Club. There will be about 
SO guests. The Chamberlains will return 
to their home in Pittssburg next month. 

— ■ In honor of Miss Lorna William , 

at whose wedding on October 8 she is 
to be one of the bridesmaids. Miss Julia 
Van Fleet entertained a luncheon party 
Tuesday afternoon at the Francisca Club. 

Miss Helen Perkins entertained at 

luncheon at her home in Palo Alto on 
Saturday afternoon in honor of Miss Ka- 
therine Stoney, fiancee of Ensign Burns 
Macdonald, U. S. N., and Miss Marian 
Winner, who will be married to Lieutenant 
Hubert H. Anderson, U. S. N„ at St. Luke's 
Church on September 5. 

Miss Margaret Madison and Miss Anne 

Dibblee, two engaged girls, were the prin- 
cipal guests at a luncheon given Saturday 
in Menlo Park by Miss Mary Emma Flood. 

Miss Edna Taylor gave a luncheon on 

Wednesday for Miss Florence Russell, who 
will be married to Mr. Philip Hurn this 
Saturday. The luncheon took place at the 
Taylor home in Menlo Park, where Miss 
Taylor and her mother, Mrs. William H. 
Taylor, are passing the summer. 

Miss Marion Zeile will entertain at a 

luncheon party on Monday in honor of 
Mrs. Willard Chamberlin. 

Mr. and Mrs. Willard Chamberlin, 

who are leaving on the last of the month 
for Pittsburg, will give a farewell luncheon 
at the Burlingame Country Club on Sun- 
day, entertaining all their friends. 

On Friday Mrs. George N. Armsby 

was hostess at a luncheon party at her 
home. 

Miss Marion Wirtner, who will be 

married to Lieutenant Hubert H. Anderson, 
U. S. N., at St. Luke's church on the 5th 



of September, was complimented at a 
luncheon and bridge party given Tuesday 
afternoon by Mrs. Theodore Rethers Jr., 
formerly Miss Adele Chevalier. 
Miss Cecily Casserly gave an infor- 
mal luncheon at the Woman's Athletic Club 
on Monday in honor of Miss Katherinc 
Schuyler of New York, who is returning 
East in another week after a month's visit 
with Mrs. George Rodman Shreve and Miss 
Agnes Shreve in San Mateo. 
Teas 

Miss Ritchie Sutton of St. Louis, who 

is visiting Miss Alice Carr in San Rafael, 
was the guest for whom Miss Charlotte 
Ziele entertained at a bridge party Tuesday 
afternoon at her home in San Rafael. 

Miss Frances Revett, another of the 

season's brides-elect, whose wedding to 
Bradley Wallace will take place at Grace 
Cathedral on September 8, was guest of 
honor at a tea by one of her bridesmaids. 
Miss Helen Deamer, who entertained at the 
Palace hotel Tuesday. 

Miss Dorothy Meyer, the subdebu- 

tante daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. L. 
E. Meyer, Jr., was hostess at a large affair 
Tuesday afternoon entertaining several 
score of her friends at bridge and tea in 
honor of Miss Leila Scott of Washington, 

D. C. The affair was given at the II. L. 

E. Meyer Jr. home on Green street. 

Dances 

Dr. and Mrs. George Lyman gave a 

dance at their home at Woodside Saturday 
evening. 

In honor of Miss Merrill Jones, Mrs. 

Webster Jones will entertain at a dancing 
party September 3. The affair will be held 
at the home of the hostess in San Rafael 
and will be enjoyed by the younger set of 
the Marin County cities. 

Miss Barbara Kimble will give a 

dance on September 3 at Palo Alto for Miss 
Ynez Macondray and Miss Edna Taylor, 
who will be debutantes next winter. 

Miss Frances Pringle will lie a 

debutante this winter and will be intro- 
duced to society in the early part of 
the season. She is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Pringle. 



The 
Palace 



FOR 



Exclusive 
Entertainment 



Management of 

Halsey E. Man waring 




CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR AUGUST 27. 1921 



Mrs. Jacques de la Montanya and 

Dana McEwen, who announced their en- 
gagement recently, were guests of honor at 
an informal dinner dance given Tuesday 
evening by Dr. and Mrs. Karl Schaupp at 
their home on Lake street. 



-Countess Lewenhaupt, who has a 



house at San Mateo for the summer, gave 
a dinner Sunday evening, Mrs. Constance 
Peters spent the week-end with the Coun- 
tess and returned to town Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. George T. Marye were 

hosts at a bridge supper party Tuesday 
night, Mrs. Marye is having several of 
these affairs prior to their going away in a 
few weeks. 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Welch en- 
tertained some of their friends at a dinner 
party on Thursday evening. 

Mr. and Mrs. George N. Armsby will 

have some of their friends to dine at their 
home in Burlingame on Sunday night. 

In Town and Out 

Mrs. Stetson Winslow, who has been 

at the Oxnard camp on the Feather river, 
returned Wednesday. The Oxnards .will 
come home on the last of this month. 

Mrs. Frederick W. Bradley and 

children, who have been in Idaho over the 
summer, have returned to their home on 
Washington street. 

Mrs. Templeton Crocker, Mrs. Fred- 
erick Kohl, Mrs. William H. Taylor, Mrs. 
Mountford S. Wilson and Mrs. Walter S. 
Martin, who were away on a fishing and 
camping outing, returned on Thursday to 
their respective houses in Burlingame 

Mr. and Mrs. William Sproule, who 

have been away for several weeks in New 
York, Colorado Springs and elsewhere, re- 
turned on Monday and left again Tuesday 
for Tucson, Ariz. They went south to at- 
tend the funeral of President Randolph of 
the Mexican Central Railway. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Foster Dlltton 

and Mr and Mrs. Laurence I. Scott, who 
have been at Webber Lake for weeks, will 
return the last of this week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward S. Harkness 

have arrived from New York and are at 
the Fairmont. They are traveling for Mrs. 
Harkness' health. Mr. Harkness is an 
uncle of Mrs. A. King Macomber of Bur- 
lingame and is rated as the seventh richest 

man in the United States, 

Mrs. Jean Howard returned to town 

Tuesday from Menlo Park, where she 
visited Mrs. William H. Taylor and Miss 
Edna Taylor, Miss Taylor came to town 
with Miss llowai I to spend a few days at 
the Howard home on Broadway. 

Mrs. Albert Rces returned to town 

Monday from a week-end visit to Mr. and 
Mrs. John MeXear at their country home 
On the Russian river. Commander Rces. U, 
S. N '... arrived Wednesday with the fleet. 

Mr. and Mrs. Austin Tubbs returned a 

few days ago from the Orient, where they 
spent three months traveling, and i: 
tablished at their new home on Broadway, 
The trip was taken as part of their V 
moon. Mrs. Tubbs was Mrs. Fanon Burr. 



Mr. Tallani Tubbs, has returned to 

San Francisco. He arrived Monday from 
Europe where he went with Mr. Charles 
Dabney Jr., of Santa Barbara. 
Mrs. George T. Marye and her daugh- 
ter, Miss Helen Marye, returned to Burlin- 
game Saturday from Los Angeles, where 
they visited Colonel and Mrs. Fowler. Miss 
Lily O'Connor is visiting the Marye family 
at Burlingame. 

Mrs. Stetson Wilnslow has returned 

from the Feather River where she has been 
camping with her sister, Mrs. Robert Ox- 
nard, Mr. Oxnard and Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam Hinckley Taylor. Mrs. Winslow is 
planning a trip North to visit her daughter, 
Mrs Sidney Van Wyck Peters, at Portland. 

Miss Frances Pringle has come up 

from Santa Barbara, where she has been 
passing the summer with her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Edward Pringle and she will be 
here until after the marriage on Saturday 
of Miss Florence Russell and Philip Murn. 

Miss Francesca Deering left Monday 

for Santa Barbara, where she will be the 
guest for a week of Mrs. Norris King Da- 
vis and her daughters, Miss Marjorie and 
Miss Nancy Davis, who have taken pso- 
session of their lovely home in the south- 
ern city. They expect to be there all win- 
ter. 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Buck and Miss 

Viola Buck who have been at their home 

in San Rafael this summer, are now in Los 

Angeles , .. 

Intimations 

Mr. and Mrs. Adrian Splivalo, who 

went to England to live a year ago, have 
moved to Paris. During their long resi- 
dence in England they had a home near 
another San Franciscan Mrs. William Sayre 
wdio was Miss Fanny Miner. 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis H. Davis are 

being welcomed home after a four months' 
i 'ii of Europe, where they passed the sum- 
mer. They reached California last Thurs- 
ud have gone to their Santa Cruz 
rancho for the remainder of August, and 
next month they expect to take up their 
winter quarters at the Fairmont Hotel. 
In their trip abroad they first motored 
through England and then took a leisurely 
tour of France, Italy and Spain. 

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Maynard, 

who will pass the winter in San Rafael. 
having recently taken possession of a house 
near "Meadowland". Mr. Maynard is one 
of the modern literary lights of Great 
Britain and has taken the chair of English 
at the Dominican convent in San Rafael. 
Mr. and Mrs. Byington Ford are re- 
ceiving the congratulations of their friends 
on the birth of a daughter on Monday. 
Mrs. Ford is the former Miss Marion 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Walter took 

their departure Wednesday for Europe. 
They are planning to travel abroad for an 
indefinite period. 

Charles Templeton Crocker is en 

route to Europe, having left on Sun- 
day. Crocker is going to Monte Car- 
lo, where his opera will have its pre- 
miere the first week in January. Jos- 
eph D. Redding has written the music. 



13 



The opera was first given in 1916, as 
the annual grove play of the Bohemian 
Club. 




HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 



•SAN FRANCISCO- • 
A BIG HOTEL 
jWHEBE THE LITTLE THINGS COUNT! 



The 

Fable Room 

decorated with conceits 
from Aesop's Fables 
offers you a quiet and 
dignified atmosphere in 
which to entertain your 
friends at 

Luncheon 
or 
Dinner 

* 

THOS. J. COLEMAN 
Manager 



ELECTROLYSIS 

■ i and moles, warts and 
superfluous hair permanently removed ba 

i multiple needle machine. 
Work guaranteed, 

MADAM STIVER 

133 Geary Street, Suite 723 Whitney Building 
Phone Douglas 

Oakland. Suite 424, First Nat. Bank Building 



J. E. BIRMINGHAM Main Corridor 

• » * * * * 
I'M. ACE HOTEL Opposite Rose Room 

* « * « * * 
JEWELS In Platinum 

* * * * * * 
REM' 'DELING Old Styles Into New 

* • * * * * 
UNIQUE DESIGNS Time-Keeping Watches 

• • • * ♦ * 
FINE TEWELRV Of All Descriptions 

• » • * * * 
EXPERT Repair Work 



NEW YORK LONDON 

\ TP.KATNrKNT FOR 
• HAIR. 

THE FRANCES FOX 

506 Crocker Bldg., Ma 
Phone Sutter 


Til! 


r.\Kis 

LP 

ind 

Ital 

5TITUTE 
\he Hair 
and Post 


IN! 

rket 
5118 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 





iFINANCIAy 




It May Now be said the reports as to 
crops from all over the country are 
good. The wheat crop is not quite as 
abundant as last year, and some of the 
other crops, less volume but much of 
this may be due to the fact that pur- 
posely not so much was planted. The 
fruit crop, unless untoward things hap- 
pen in some sections, is generally fair 
to good. So that, as far as crops are 
concerned, although one hears, here 
and there the wail of some calamity 
howler raised in distress, we may rest 
easy in our minds. Of course, wc are 
not out of the woods yet, as far as the 
prune crop is concerned, and there may 
be early rains and some of the yield 
may be spoiled, but that happens right 
along, once in a while, and there seems 
no help for it except the dehydration 
of fruit. And it is the belief of this 
columnist that the time is coming soon 
when open-air drying of apricots or 
prunes or other fruits will be prohib- 
ited by law. The dehydrated method 
is absolutely sanitary and it is so much 
more practical and quicker that as soon 
as a successful dehydrator is in use 
out-door drying will in a large measure 
stop, automatically. Those who use 
dried fruits and vegetables would not 
like to do so, if they could see the flies, 
the other insects, the dust and the dry 
manure that blows over the drying 
fields at the time of least moisture. 
There are many dehydrators in use but 
few of them are successful. In time 
there will be community drying plants 
in every section, where the drying of 
fruits goes on today in the sun. 

if: $ ^c ^c 

The industrial situation is again com- 
plicated on both sides of the bay 
through men leaving jobs, to which 
they had returned, on the American 
Plan. ■ The men say that they have 
been "jobbed" or "sold out" by McCar- 
thy and the other leaders, who, after 
refusing the award of the arbitration 
committee, thereafter voted to accept 
it. At the same time, those who have 
been "pulled" off. of what they call 
Open Shop jobs, say that they do not 
believe they can stand the loss of work 
long with the leaders working hand 
and glove with the Open Shop crowd. 
All of which means that there i- a 
schismatic fight inside of the unions. 
In both San Francisco and Oakland a 
great many men have remained at 
work right along-side of the American 
Plan workers and so far there has 
been no trouble and no interference 
with men who belong to the unions, 
as long as they do not interfere with 
the free workingmen. 
# * * * 

We have dwelt on the matter be- 
fore but it does no harm to insist 



again and again that the financial situ- 
ation will remain strained just so long 
as this additional factor of industrial 
unrest is not settled and settled right. 
And now is the time to fight it out and 
it is being settled right. 

T T T T 

There are millions of dollars worth 
of building work held in abeyance in 
the Metropolitan Bay District and the 
only bar to active employment of 
everyone who is able to wield a ham- 
mer or handle a saw is the recalci- 
trance and arrogance of the rank and 
file union men. 

Shipping — Export business still im- 
proves and there has been some im- 
provement in importing as well. Jap- 
an is buying in this country. There has 
been some buying on account of the 
Dutch East India merchants, too. 
China is still commercially and politic- 
ally ill. The Philippines are recovering 
and business between the United States 
and the island possessions is improv- 
ing . All of this has had an effect on 
shipping business. But, more than 
anything else, the fact stands out that 
the morale of the exporter, importer, 
and shipping man is much improved. 
Money is more plentiful and the world 
merchandiser is peeking out of his hole 
in which he has been hiding since the 
financial tornado began blowing. 
* * * * 

Broadly speaking, we are still grop- 
ing about to find a common ground for 
alliance between the financial, the 
merchandising, the manufacturing and 
the traffic intere"sts. This entente cor- 
diale is about as difficult to bring about 
as a unanimous opinion about the 
League of Nations. Eventually, we 
will have an understanding and some 
sort of policy will be adopted which 
will firmly establish the big financial 
interests of the country as the base 
of the pyramid supporting world 
trade. Today we have a dozen finan- 
cial corporations, each one using its 
capital for the up-building of some ac- 
tivity in which directors and stock- 
holders of the institution may be inter- 
ested. \Ye have, it is true, a number of 
financial organizations, whose direc- 
tors and stockholders are not so inter- 
ested but we have no general plan as 
to banking, manufacturing, merchan- 
dising and shipping as they have in 
England. France or Germany. One 
thing we will have to do and that is 
to make the American people Ship- 
Minded. We have a job right here in 
San Francisco and Oakland to make 
the people Ship-Minded and it is not 
an easy job. Very few San Franciscans 
realize that this is one of the largest 
areas in the United States on which to 



build factories and from which to ex- 
port and to which to import and that 
the entire shore line of San Francisco 
Bay should be devoted to dockage and 
factories. San Francisco is well pro- 
vided with harbor facilities but our 
manufacturing and export and import 
activities have not kept pace with the 
facilities afforded by the State for our 
use. San Francisco Bay as an export 
and import center should in time eclipse 
the two ports of Hongong and Ham- 
burg combined. How many believe 
that? 

Insurance — The general complaint in 
insurance circles is that there is a de- 
cided lack of new business. Judging 
by what makes business brisk in other 
lines this dullness is not at all to be 
wondered at. From the most widely 
advertised of all businesses insurance 
has gradually, to a very large extent, 
resolved itself into a matter of solic- 
itation. The solicitor, who is not back- 
ed by advertising, is fighting a very 
hard battle and, while representing a 
good company or agency, is liable to 
lose out to a company or agency which 
does not stand nearly so high, because 
of the fact that a lack of advertising 
has lowered all companies to a dead 
level and it is to the man with the gift 
of gab or to the friend that in- 
surance patronage goes. When bus- 
iness is dull life may easily be infused 
in any kind of business by judicious 
and continued publicity. If insurance 
agencies showed their old time vim 
and pep in advertising there would be 
much less talk about poor business. 



Mining — From Tonopah comes the 
news that the 100 stamp mill of the 
Tonopah Mining Company, at Willers, 
which has been shut down since April 
16 on account of the strike has opened 
up and is running with crews in all 
departments. The company has not 
taken sides in the strike controversy 
anil it has re-hired most of its old 
hands. Nearly all of the mining com- 
panies in the Tonopah District have 
resumed and. in some cases, old hands 
are back at work while in others the 
companies have announced that the 
men who took the places of the strikers 
would be retained. There is more ac- 
tivity at Goldfield and mines there are 
turning out good ore. 



The Stock Markets — The New York 
stock market has been very dull due to 
what some have termed "financial las- 
situde", whatever that may mean. The 
fact is that the downward trend in 
stocks has not been stopped, seriously. 
for any length of time, for months. 
Nothing has happened of a startling 
nature to offset the general apathy 
which seems to continually prevail 
despite the fact that all sign-, point 
to a general revival of business. 
It cannot be doubted that tax free se- 
curities have had a great deal to do 
with handicapping industrials. But 



CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER FOR AUGUST 27. 1921 



15 



this is not of sufficient volume to ac- 
count, to any wide extent, for the lack 
of interest in stocks of any kind. It 
is pointed out that doubt and hesita- 
tion always prevail at this time of year 
and it must be taken into considera- 
tion, too. that New York has had a 
sweltering summer and it is quite seas- 
onable for a slump at this particular 
time each year. Prices at wholesale 
show a remarkable steadiness, which 
is a good sign, and gradually there has 
been wage recession all over the coun- 
try, in turn followed by re-employ- 
ment, but there are so many strikes 
that these offset in their very bad ef- 
fects the good effects of the "spotty" 
re-employment. When wage reces- 
sions cease and re-employment may be 
said to be the general rule and build- 
ing operations are resumed and indus- 
trial plants approach anything like a 
normal pasis of employment as well 
we will then be on the way to a more 
prosperous period. That this period is 
hovering very near cannot be doubted. 
When the hot spell is over and the men 
return to their desks from their vaca- 
tions and visualise the field for the 
battle of the survival of the fiittest 
close on to the end of the year a diff- 
erent story will be told. It must be 
taken into account that, while the im- 
provement is slow, world financial and 
industrial conditions are constantly im- 
proving. The old world continent, 
with the exception of Russia and Tur- 
key, is now practically on a peace ba- 
sis. The Silesian question bids fair 
to be settled without any further fric- 
tion. The Irish question, menacing a 
week ago, now seems likely to once 
again resolve itself into a gab test, 
with the chances of some arrangement 
satisfactory to all coming out of it. 
With the Poles and Irish satisfied the 
Germans paying their debts, and the 
nations of the world arranging mat- 
ters peaceably at Washington, we 

ought to be satisfied that all is well. 

When this is an accomplished fact we 
will have leisure to give attention 
to the Russians, the Turks, and the 
Chinese and the diplomatic road roller 
of the civilized nations will iron out 
the sore spots in quick time. 
* * * * 

["he garage and motor storage men- 
ace is given some attention in Eastern 
insurance class journals. They point to 
the fact that a garage is a community 

d that is just about being n 
ed, Athens. Georgia, had a bad tire 

last fanuary, and an entire city block 
was burned through a tire which start- 
ed in a public garage. Fourteen firms 
were burned out. \ similar fire, in 
one of our larger cities, would almost 
invariably result in a greater amount 
S. In the particular lire mention- 
ed above, and in which is held up as a 
horrible example, the tire at first was 
so intense and explosion after explo- 
sion occuring not much good could be 
done but confine the blaze. The fire- 
men could not keep the blaze in 



the structure where it originated. 

The devastation was such that the 

loss is estimated at two millions of 
dollars. Very few people take into 
consideration that a garage that is not 
housed in a concrete structure is a 
menace fire-fighters would find it hard 
to combat. We have many garages 
that are practically fire-proof, as far as 
the building is concerned in which they 
are doing business, but, it must be ad- 
mitted, too, that there are many 
garages housed in flimsy structures, 
from which a fire might very easily 
pass on to other buildings. 
* * * * 
The Oakland City Council and the 
Oakland Chamber of Commerce are 
just now making a joint investigation 
with a view to entering the insurance 
business on a mutual basis. This ac- 
tion was brought about on account of 
the high rates it is alleged are asked 
by stock companies for warehouse and 
storage insurance 1 . All will depend 
on the result of the investigation. Af- 
ter all, what are high rates? If rates 
are justified, and they usually are, 
they are not high and insurance men 
say that the committee now investi- 
gating rates will know more later than 
they do now. 



Stockholders in Every Walk 

The once popular belief that large 
corporations are owned by a few 
wealthy individuals certainly meets m 
support in the case of the Pacific das 
and Electric company. According to 
a recent compilation made by the Com- 
pany, of 13,368 subscriptions received 
for its First Preferred Stock. 7.407. or 
55.1', . are for 5 shares or less, and 11. 
178 subscriptions, or 76.2$ of the total, 
are for lots of from 1 to 10 shares. 

It is an interesting commentary upon 

the excellent distribution of this stock' 

effected by the Company that in 

City of San Francisco alone over 5.000 

ins participate in the ownership 

of Pacific Gas and Electric Company 

Preferred. The Company's stockhold- 
ers number persons in every walk in 
life, from the millionaire to the indi- 
vidual who is making a start in the di- 
rection of prosperity by purchasing one 
share on the easy payment plan. A 
subscription was recently received 
from far Korea. 

The list of Stockholders grows daily. 

$711,100 par value of First Preferred 
Stock being sold in the month of July 
to 515 purchasers. This brings the 
total amount of stock sold by the Com- 
pany direct to its consumers and others 
in the past seven rears up to $22,680. 

400. ■ ■ 

Pressmen Lose Strike 



The Rochester. X. Y. pressmen have 
lost their three months strike for 44- 
hour week. The men have gone back 
to work and accepted unconditionally 
the terms offered by the employers. 



New Arrivals in 
Men's Fall Suits 

— Good looking, well 
tailored suits, built 
for business wear. In 
Brown, Grey and Hair- 
line Stripes. Remark- 
able values at 

$40.oo 
HASTINGS 

Clothing Company 

Post Street at Kearny .-. San Francisco 



Eyes Guaranteed 

Bother OO Work at 
You? 27 7th St. 

DR.J.P.JUHL 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

ilis a practical system of placing 
manuscripts tor publication, which is im- 
portant to people who write. Frank 
criticism and revision are also available, 

1174 Phelan Building San Francisco 



\ATI1EN in Santa Clara Valley see the 
valley from the scenic electric lines. 
Trolley trips start from San Juse or 
Palo Alto. 

PENINSULA RAILWAY CO. 

SAN JOSE, CAL. 



We Stand for the Best in Business Training 


/ 


Cf\ 


Munson ffl 


>,/#)) School 


^ 


FOR 


Private 


Secretaries 


600 SUTTER ST. 


FRANKLIN 306 




a log 



I ° 


^ri CoroNA 

" i 1 "The Partonal Wrltim Machine" 

J\ Fold It Up 




yj Take It With You 




jj3«\ Typewrite 
j^B^V Anywhere 




-^^==^^3 Call or write for 




, klet 


$50.00-WITH CASE 

CORONA TYPEWRITER CO., Inc. 

ine 

- » 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND 




PL/EASURD'S WAND 



Obey No Wand but Pleasure's. — Tom Moore 




Alcazar 

'Moonlight and Honeysuckle's is not 
an appropriate play forSanFranciscans. 
We allowed Gladys George to get us 
all excited about the big, full moon and 
with the breath of honeysuckle in our 
nostrils we applauded strenuously and 
stepped out — into the foggy night and 
chooked and sputtered as a misguided 
chap perfumed the air with gasoline 
smoke. Thus a perfectly good evening 
was ruined, and why nightmares did 
not follow is a mystery. 

The dainty little leading lady was 
charming as the romantic daughter of 
a western Senator, ably portreyed by 
Charles Yule. While father is getting 
married to the wise widow (Marie 
Dunkle), daughter Anita plays havoc 
with the affections of a Congressman, 
a diner-out — so the program termed 
him — and her father's manager, (Dud- 
ley Ayres.) Being a Westerner in the 
East, Ayres will know what is meant 
by 'being there a million'. He was, and 
is ably supported by Thomas Chatter- 
ton and Ben Erway. Many laughs liv- 
en up this comedy and furnish patrons 
some of the best humor offered by the 
versatile company this season. 

Dean of American Actors at Orpheum 

William H. Crane has been "playing 
politics" on the stage for many years ; 
he began as "The Senator" in New 
York when this century was young, 
and now we see him as "The Mayor" 
at the Orpheum, looking forward to 
being "The Governor." A fine and fn- 
ished performance was presented by 
this reliable actor in a bright little one- 
act by George Ade with a catchy title, 
"The Mayor and the Manicure." 
Clean and wholesome, full of snap and 
genuine fun, the kind of playlet we'd 
like to see more of ; but there is but one 
William H. Crane, — may he live long 
and prosper. There are a few things 
new under the sun in vaudeville, and 
Flanagan and Morrison in their inter- 
esting skit, "A Lesson in Golf" have 
found one and put it on in excellent 
fashion. Ona Munson reverses the us- 
ual order of things in her sprightly 
"revue" by having half a dozen young 
men dancers and herself the only lady. 
Carson and Willard have a popular bit 
of frothy humor in "Meet the Doctor." 
A long and average good list of enter- 
tainers surround those we have named. 

Imperial 

As the first of a series of super-pro- 
ductions, we are offered this week 
House Peters and Irene Rich in 'The 
Invincibl